TEFL

This topic contains 13 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  WriterArtist 1 year, 5 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #156641

    isabelbamford
    Participant
    Neophyte

    I would like to teach English as a Foreign Language in Greece. I have been looking at an ad from an outfit called Anglo Hellenic. i have seen some negative postings about them, but they seem to be some time ago. Can anyone give me any advice?

  • #183256

    Redtapesolutions
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Yes , there is much more to it than having a TEFL teaching certificate. Most schools now ask for a Degree (preferably in the language you want to teach) and the Greek government insists you sit an exam in Greek before you can teach at a private school in Greece. You can get all the details via the British Council website.

  • #183257

    kouklitsa
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Hello,

    You need to pass a written and oral Greek exam. And then you need to pass a proficiency in English exam. I wish you all the best.

  • #183258

    sjs – GiH Admin
    Keymaster
    Aristotelic

    There’s no need to pass the Proficiency in English exam. That’s only for Greek speakers to do.

    You’ll need a degree and a TEFL certificate. There are others out there aside from Anglo-Hellenic so look around.

    And the Greek knowledge is actually illegal – they have been taken to the European Court over this and found guilty but haven’t yet changed the law in Greece and are being fined over it. No worries – the government have plenty of money to pay the fines these days!

    Take a look here: http://teflworldwiki.com/index.php/Greece

    GiH Admin

  • #183259

    tash87
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Hi Everyone

    Just wondering if anyone can help…I have a bachelor of Primary Education from Australia and have been teaching full time. I have Greek parents and speak and write fluent Greek. I am interested in teaching English in Greece at the beginning of the school term after summer 2011. Do I need a TEFL? Where do I get one from? Which is the best and how much is it? When do I have to start the process in order to have it by July when I leave Sydney. Can I get it in Greece? Would this be easier? Does any one know what documents I need to bring with me?

    Thank you! :)

  • #183261

    sjs – GiH Admin
    Keymaster
    Aristotelic

    In general you’ll need a degree and a TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) certificate to get a visa and work. The TEFL certificate can be taken either in-house or online at your own pace which is a much cheaper option (see http://icalweb.com).

    GiH Admin

  • #183260

    gregstav
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Actually all you really need is a degree from a university in an English speaking country.
    You submit your degree (translated and certified) along with a copy of your transcript to the Ministry of Education and you get recognised as a English teacher, you then apply for a teachers licence (simple procedure- you need chest x rays, and an assessment by a psychologist and of course about 50 euros)

    Bear in mind that private language schools in Greece don’t really pay very well, at best you can hope for about 9 Euros an hour if you’re lucky,

  • #183263

    David
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Just out of curiosity, why do you need a chest X-ray?

  • #183264

    sjs – GiH Admin
    Keymaster
    Aristotelic

    Tuberculosis. ic_shock

    GiH Admin

  • #183262

    David
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Thanks for the answer. I’m thinking about looking for a teaching job in Greece, but must admit health checks do fill me with some anxiety, never one of my favourite things.

  • #183265

    tash87
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Thanks everyone!
    I already have a teaching degree from Australia so I think I will just go there with that and hope for the best!

  • #183266

    peterbeech
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Hi,

    Just saw this thread.

    Anyone wanting information about teaching English in Greece, feel free to email us at
    jobs@anglo-hellenic.com or phone 27410 553511.

    Peter

  • #183267

    dimitrios
    Participant
    Neophyte

    I got my Greek teaching permit in September of ’12. You need a foreign i.e. English/US degree and some other paperwork depending on your nationality. If you’re an EU citizen but not Greek, the school actually gets the permit for you in their name–however, it’s a ton of work for them.

    If you’re Greek/American, like myself, then you’ll also need some kind of proof that you know Greek–even a certificate from a US Greek Orthodox church certifying that you took some Greek lessons will suffice. While civil workers and anything in the public domain in Greece is like a skit in a Monty Python movie, the Ministry of Education is surprisingly helpful and will assist you.

    Bear in mind, Greek employment laws, if they exist, aren’t at all like those abroad. They can ask your age, marital status, if you have kids, and anything else they feel like asking. Also, beware of those who ask for photographs. Aside from being irrelevant when assessing your qualifications, they can be used to evaluate you based solely on your appearance. I was once asked to provide a photo for a pending interview and quickly turned down the offer, do not fall into this trap.

    I’ve been working for a private tutoring school teaching advanced level English, Proficiency, IELTS, etc., for about a year now and it’s been great. Another issue you have to deal with is getting paid. It seems in Greece it’s a fad not to pay employees using the economy as an excuse. I’ve heard of situations where people haven’t been paid in months. If at any time you do not get paid, you must immediately quit instead of hoping you’ll get all your pay the following month. This is a sad but all too real event. Fortunately, this hasn’t happened to me because I work for an honest company, a dying breed in Greece.

  • #224043

    WriterArtist
    Participant
    Hoplite

    I know this thread is an old one, but just wanted to point out that anyone with an English degree, or proven knowledge/experience, and a basic tefl certificate, but who cannot teach in a formal Greek tefl school, can teach basic English to students in a private class, say, at their own home.  As far as I am aware it is not illegal to do this and can be very useful for Greeks wanting to improve their chit-chat, pronunciation and annunciation of the English language.

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.