Nothing in particular

Forums Living in Greece General Discussion Nothing in particular

This topic contains 436 replies, has 18 voices, and was last updated by  kiwi 1 year, 7 months ago.

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  • #158791

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Well seems that a few folks are coming out of the woodwork. Nice to see some action on the site. Thought I would start a thread where you can talk about any subject that ails you or what’s happening for Easter since we seem to have done xmas pressies in another thread.

    My irk today is technology and the time it wastes. TImes were a lot simpler in the old days. Now I need to sincc my ipad it seems, how, I don’t know then save the info on an external drive as I refuse to use a cloud since it may rain on me one day…and all this stuff takes time and learning and hours of sitting at a computer searching for the right answer. Then the ‘time saving’ online applications…hours of becoming legitimate and then having that cursed window pop up to tell you your application can not be completed for some unexplained reason and to please start again only to get the same problem.

    Wasn’t life simpler when you were a kid? Went outside, played. Grew up, went outside played. Now…old…stay inside glued to a screen, see no one and build up mega stress with technology.

    Add to that, travel now. ARGH!!! Old days, get to airport, show passport, sit down and wait for plane. Now…frisked in important places by some evil eyed, unsmiling, powerweilding person in uniform, made to take off shoes belts and watches, hiff out the laptops, and all in brooding fuming silence since one would not like to cross one of these powercows on their patch. My rant could continue with a certain border control person of female gender who viewed me with rancour and asked every possible question in her repertoire before letting me through. Only in Blighty are they generally smiling and polite and I don’t mind going there.

    I shall eat my soup now; Chick Pea with original lumps.

  • #196396

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    …Not tempted by the “Dog Soup” then I take – What was that all about? I have been to Aden as well, never heard of Dog soup. Only thing I ever noticed were fanatics & Arabs falling out of hellicopters :)) Well it was the early sixties !

  • #196397

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Only thing I ever noticed were fanatics & Arabs falling out of hellicopters

    Wow, Sunnyboy! Did you think Mad Mitch was that fanatical?

  • #196398

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    When I was in Saigon, Dog was always on the menu in certain parts of town, Full moon was the auspicious time to eat it as I recall. Never had the pleasure. Did have the pleasure of drinking snake wine, home brew made with snakes lizards and other crawlies in the jar. It was rude to refuse…………………………..(no smilies for throwing up I see). The other great delicacy was raw ducks blood served with squeezed lime at my favourite duck restaurant.

  • #196399

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    Well kolo – I didn’t think Mitch was fanatical at all! I do believe the right person was in the right place at the right time….Crater was a very unusual place to be !

  • #196400

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Lived in Aden from 1963 till 1966 and left just before the big pull out of 1967.
    As we lived in Crater for the first couple of years, before being evacuated to the RAF base at Khormaksar for the last year or so as Crater became out of bounds, ‘Mad Mitch’ was childhood hero and remember seeing him a few times stood upright with his Sterling sub machine gun pointed up in the air as he sped past in a fast moving Land Rover dodging through the traffic of Crater with his patrols!
    One time on our school run from Crater to Khormaksar our bus (an old Bedford Sheriban) broke down on the coast road, with steep hills on one side and sea on the other. We always went to school with steel grids on the bus windows and an armed guard on the bus and an armed Land Rover patrol accompanying us. Anyway, when the bus broke down, a call went out for more support and Mad Mitch actually turned up and took control. We kids were so excited to see our hero on our bus talking to us and taking control of our security! All exciting stuff, but never knew of or saw any dogs being eaten there! Lots of goats though! :mrgreen:

  • #196365

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    Goodness kp!… Just think, if we had been really unlucky, we could have known each other way back then! – There again, a young Sailor let loose in the World & associating with a schoolboy, could have been misinterpreted :mrgreen:

  • #196366

    GlennB
    Participant
    Neophyte

    @kiwi wrote:

    ….. Then the ‘time saving’ online applications…hours of becoming legitimate and then having that cursed window pop up to tell you your application can not be completed for some unexplained reason and to please start again only to get the same problem.

    Amen to that. When MrsB popped back to Blighty for some days I booked her a bus ticket and overnight stay for the return trip, online. The NatWest card verification system was rejected by Firefox’s “No script” option. It took about 3 attempts and oodles of time to find a workaround, as each failure was a ‘start all over again’ job.

    Bah!

    No soup today, as there was leftover fish pie and salad.

  • #196367

    GlennB
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Anyone else getting appeals locally for food donations to Kefalonia? We get p.a. announcements around these villages and it seems they’re collecting ‘ready to eat’ stuff for transport to the stricken island.

    We’re very willing to help but it seems a bit perverse to lug cans and packets all that way. I might pass by the town hall and see if they’re also taking money …..

  • #196368

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    @GlennB wrote:

    …. We’re very willing to help but it seems a bit perverse to lug cans and packets all that way. I might pass by the town hall and see if they’re also taking money …..

    Isn’t that likely to be a bit like contributing the money to my donkey fund? :roll: Which you’re welcome to do of course! :)) I would just be worried that cash won’t all see it’s way to where it should go…. much like food! :roll:

  • #196369

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    @sundodger wrote:

    Goodness kp!… Just think, if we had been really unlucky, we could have known each other way back then! – There again, a young Sailor let loose in the World & associating with a schoolboy, could have been misinterpreted :mrgreen:

    oooh, you saucy sailor you Mr Sunnydoggy! :mrgreen:
    BTW: There’s a great FaceBook group called ‘Khormaksar Secondary School (British Forces Aden)’ which I’m a member of and has lots of ex-students of the school, soldiers who served there and even old matelots who knew Aden as members on the group. But more importantly, there are hundreds of old pics of Aden, including dozens of pics of RN ships which would regularly visit Aden. So you should join the group Sundoggy and see if you can spot yourself or your ship!

  • #196370

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Some of our pics of coming and going to school in Aden in the 1960s

  • #196194

    GlennB
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Wood. I like wood.

    Last year I cut two major sections off unruly olive trees in the back garden. After much trimming and sawing ended up with about a month’s worth of firewood (on a cold day).

    But it only had about 8 months to season (sheltered, and in some sun) and I wondered if that was enough. Yet it burned brilliantly, almost too hot.

    Who else likes wood? I can’t get enough of it.

  • #196195

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Ahh finally some action on the site. Lovely photos full of Nostalgia there KP.

    Yes I love wood but hate it being burned, but love a log fire, but worry about the pollution…go figure.

    Money for Kefalonia…….give food etc, I don’t trust anyone in power with money.

    Floods and disasters. My kid in Old Windsor is up with the army sandbagging the house and moving stuff upstairs. Full moon tomorrow and storms and rain coming and the Thames lock is just around the corner from them. Not good! In Asia the full moon was always mentioned since it brought flooding. In the West there is hardly a word about it. I can’t begin to imagine how dreadfull a house full of water and mud would be, the cold, and the misery of it all. Sad, sad for anyone in such a situation. Wondering how scary all this will be for a wee one to experience.

    I can’t download Service Pack 1 for Win7, therefore don’t have a modern browser as Gmail tells me ad nauseum……………………..Grrrrrrr. Modernity is getting to me these days. I want to live in a Cob House of straw, grow tomatoes and pick my own olives for the oil and forget Apps and downloads and fuffing around for hours online to get me exactly nowhere but mad..

    And…it’s 3am. Good Morning all. :unibrow:

  • #196196

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Forgot…if anyone wants to vote about the Parthenon Marbles, here is the link

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/poll/2014/feb/12/george-clooney-elgin-marbles-monument-men-poll

    Ian do not remind me of how stupid I am in not remembering how to shorten the links AGAIN.

  • #196197

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    As Ian is banned from commenting (as if that will stop him) can I just mention that long links can be shortened by ……………………………….

  • #196198

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Nice to see some nostalgic pix there KP. I just wonder which child you are? Could you be the one with the curly hair in the pretty dress practicing for an adult Sunday ? :)) ic_wink

  • #196199

    GlennB
    Participant
    Neophyte

    @kolofarthos wrote:

    As Ian is banned from commenting (as if that will stop him) can I just mention that long links can be shortened by ……………………………….

    I always forget too. I once asked here and saved the format in a file to remind myself when I next forgot.

    Can’t find the file :)

  • #196305

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Can’t help you there Glenn, I do not remember too …… 😳 😳 😳 😳
    Perhaps Ian or Dayglo or some other bright person with a memory will help soon……. :nod:

  • #196304

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Great! I am not the only dur brain that does not know how to do it. Some clever sites shorten the links automatically. How cool would that be here. Ian seems to have vanished, he is the master of the lesson.

    Checked out the floodees and so far they are safe but more rain expected and Harry and Wills were around there lifting sandbags. My 3yr old granddaughter was very impressed by the calibre and good looks of the soldiers at the door.Ahh so like her grandma, appreciates what’s really important in bad times.

    Since we are all here chatting about nothing very important, doesn’t some new blood have a story to tell? Come on, it would be a pleasure to hear from other than the same old us farts on the site.

    I love those old black and white photos, there is always a nostalgia attached to them. Bet some of you GOM have a few you could share with us.

  • #196272

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    @kolofarthos wrote:

    Nice to see some nostalgic pix there KP. I just wonder which child you are? Could you be the one with the curly hair in the pretty dress practicing for an adult Sunday ? :)) ic_wink

    Do I detect an element of jealousy there kolo? You’re just jealous of my pretty curls and the attention the soldiers are giving me. :p Don’t worry mate… I’m sure that if you lived in a garrison town with soldiers flashing their big guns around that they’d be giving you lots of attention whenever you wear that pink frilly skirt you like wearing out each evening! ic_wink

  • #196273

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Dear KP, Do you have a surveillance camera installed in my lounge?

    If so you might have realised that the main problem with wearing pink frilly skirts is they expose hairy legs fooling nobody and I have a problem keeping my long boxers rolled up! 😆

    ……and yes I am aware that nothing should be worn under the kilt!! How dare you call it a frilly skirt? :p I’ll set Mrs KP on you! ic_shock

  • #196274

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    Ian seems to have vanished, he is the master of the lesson.

    Far from it (currently rockin’and rollin’ off Denmark waiting for the seas to come below 4.5 m so we can get to work) but I’ve been specifically instructed not to comment. 😳

    So, being a good boy, I won’t. 😛

  • #196275

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    kolo-fart: Pictures for proof to be posted please? :mrgreen:

    Ian: Do you ever get seasick? 😕 Got any pics or video of the sea conditions? 😯 Just no pics or videos of what you sailors do to pass the time when stuck at sea though please! :roll:

  • #196276

    GlennB
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Ah, here we are –

    Ekathimerini article

  • #196277

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    @GlennB wrote:

    Ah, here we are –

    Ekathimerini article

    One doesn’t need to be a prophet to foresee these outcomes from ill thought out and hurried legislation in Greece! Just as one doesn’t need to be a prophet to foresee that although it’s been deemed unconstitutional and became legal only through the intervention of government’s say so, that we are not likely to get any refunds flowing our way! :(
    Ah well, all part of the rich, colourful tapestry of life and politics which is Greece! :mrgreen:

  • #196278

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Some pics would be great since this seems to be the worst storm/weather in a hundred years ont hat side of Europe Ian. Be safe.

  • #196279

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Well call me old fashioned, but I sort of liked the days when there were two genders. I am of the female variety, full stop.

    Check this out…56 choices!

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2014/02/13/facebook_custom_gender_options_here_are_all_56_custom_options.html

  • #196280

    GlennB
    Participant
    Neophyte

    @GlennB wrote:

    Ah, here we are –

    Ekathimerini article

    Dumbos. That was me being flash, showing how I’d found out how to put in a nifty link thingy 😉

    Anyone elese here in Greece still getting mozzies even at this strange time of year? We had to take down part of our bug-screen door as our ancient Labrador kept tripping on it, so maybe that explains it, but I don’t recall mozzies being around outside in previous Feb’s.

    Hope it isn’t a bad sign of a buggy summer.

  • #196281

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    Sorry, didn’t bring a camera… :(

    Anyway, it’s coming down rapidly, we’re just about to launch the ROV for the last calibrations.

    Seasick… I used to get viciously seasick in my early offshore days.
    Nowadays it doesn’t happen anymore although I do get a little queezy when we set out in bad weather without having a day or so to get into the swing again.
    Early 2013 I worked on a catemaran for the first time, that’s a distinctly different sort of movement and it did get to me for a day or two (still nothing like in the old days, when I was just hoping I’d die, though).

  • #196282

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Very impressed Glen. You figured it out. Now maybe you can give us a little teachathon.
    Are you sure they are mozzies and not something else? Probably those things that eat your clothes, especially favourite jumpers, always in center front. Baftards never eat under a sleeve where you can patch it.

    Ian I think as one gets older seasickness gets worse. When I was young and travelling on a ship between Greece and Nova Scotia in cold January, I shall never forget the passageways of sick everywhere, and the lurchng of the ship. I never even felt queasy. Nowdays, even Greek ferries where the rolling is limited tends to threaten my lunch.
    Nice to hear of your travels, it must be very exciting and dangerous work. Umm aren’t you getting a bit old for such Old Salt excitement :))

    3.45 am Sleeping is so boring.

  • #196283

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    Very impressed Glen. You figured it out. Now maybe you can give us a little teachathon.
    Are you sure they are mozzies and not something else? Probably those things that eat your clothes, especially favourite jumpers, always in center front. Baftards never eat under a sleeve where you can patch it.

    Ian I think as one gets older seasickness gets worse. When I was young and travelling on a ship between Greece and Nova Scotia in cold January, I shall never forget the passageways of sick everywhere, and the lurchng of the ship. I never even felt queasy. Nowdays, even Greek ferries where the rolling is limited tends to threaten my lunch.
    Nice to hear of your travels, it must be very exciting and dangerous work. Umm aren’t you getting a bit old for such Old Salt excitement :))

    3.45 am Sleeping is so boring.

    I’ll have you know I don’t have any intention to even think I’m getting old for, at least, another twenty years, thank you… 👿 👿

    (Although I may reduce the number of trips per year after another five years or so; more time for the horses and motorbikes 😀 😀 )

  • #196284

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    My my…you are up early Ian. Didn’t know I would have a playmate at this ungodly hour. What are you doing up? In fact was just thinking I should go back to bed and pretend to sleep for a few hours.

    HaHa…thought that age would make you bite. Nevertheless, the sea is not for the faint hearted. Fascinating though. I always dreamed to marry a Captain and travel all the time. Hmmph well that was a wasted dream wasn’t it.

  • #196285

    GlennB
    Participant
    Neophyte

    @kiwi wrote:

    Very impressed Glen. You figured it out. Now maybe you can give us a little teachathon.
    Are you sure they are mozzies and not something else?

    We’ve had a few bites indoors, and sometimes the little boogers stay still long enough to get a good look. Very small mozzies, I’d swear.

    Meanwhile – in the following example I’ll use for brackets, but you’ll have to replace them with [] for it to work :

    1. Copy your very long url, ready for pasting into the following

    2. LINKY

    3. Replace the X with your copied url, alter the LINKY to anything of your choice and you’re away.

    So, if the url is http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-26023166 , a BBC website article, then we get BBC article

    And if you forget how to do you it, just go to ‘Advanced search’ and search your own posts for “url” :)

  • #196315

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    Not seen any mossies, but we do have a few cicadas (locusts) flying about in the garden. Unusual for this time of the year.

    Resolution for this year is to hit 500 posts and get my next badge ! :retard:

    8)

  • #196316

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    Not to be pedantic but the “Locusts” & Cicadas are a totally different thing. We also have a few “locusts” for want of a better word – Large brown grasshopper type things about 4 inches long & look like a small bird when in flight, that are still eating everything green in the garden & as you say, unusual for this time of year – Cicadas are not these. We also have the odd mozzie knocking about, but when I think about the weather over in the UK these pale into insignificance ! By the way – This is a Cicada – At this time of year they are all in their beetle stage under the ground….Unless of course I’m wrong – Which as everyone knows is unlikely :))

  • #196317

    GlennB
    Participant
    Neophyte

    @sundodger wrote:

    Not to be pedantic but the “Locusts” & Cicadas are a totally different thing. We also have a few “locusts” for want of a better word – Large brown grasshopper type things about 4 inches long & look like a small bird when in flight, that are still eating everything green in the garden & as you say, unusual for this time of year – Cicadas are not these. We also have the odd mozzie knocking about, but when I think about the weather over in the UK these pale into insignificance ! By the way – This is a Cicada – At this time of year they are all in their beetle stage under the ground….Unless of course I’m wrong – Which as everyone knows is unlikely :))

    We used to find the hollow shells of cicadas clinging to twigs etc. We assumed they’d died and been consumed, but learned they’d just stopped by to moult. Doh!

    We’ll know when we get crickets – the cat will bring them in and toy with them :)

  • #196318

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Thanks Glen…will try it. Poor Ian gave us a teachathon a few years back but I have no idea where it is on the site. He was very patient about it too.

    Reiver…wonderful that you have suy
    ch high aspirations for the New Year :)) Better get online a little more and tell us daily what you are up to, that will fill up some points. This ‘nothing in particular thread’ is perfect for that. use it as a diary. We won’t get bored. I pray for ANYONE to write a few words so the forum doesn’t go down the tubes. That would be sad.

    Diary note…I lost half a filling today while chewing a lolly. No way will I get it fixed before I reach Greece again. I love my dentist, although this last time he hurt me a tad when drilling, four needles and the tooth would not get numb. He put in a special filling that he had made for the tooth, it was like a hammock that sits in the hole and it is especially made from a mold of your tooth. Cost a 100 euro but I went about five times to have the thing drilled out, so pretty cheap I thought.

  • #196320

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Where have all the women from the forum gone? ic_sad Am I the only one left here.

  • #196306

    DayGloScooter
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Here and reading…but not much to say!

    Anyone looking for a new phone may like to know that I bought one for a customer last week. Real fancy job, nearly 800 euros in Plaisio! I got it from Kaizer in Omonia for 479, which is cheaper than the best offers on HotUKDeals. Admittedly the box is in Hungarian, but it switched to English and connected just fine.

    I read the list of 56 genders on Facebook, and didn’t understand most of them. I just hope I don’t find out by accident after a drunken night out!

    Anyone struggling with the Links thing, here’s what this post looks like
    headlinks.JPG[/attachment:lys7wtqv]

  • #196307

    GlennB
    Participant
    Neophyte

    That’s a cunning way to display the method without activating it !

  • #196308

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic
  • #196309

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    Ok testing http://www.independent.co.uk/news

    You’re having us on, right? 😆

  • #196310

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Nope…thats how it came out, that was how my brain…what’s left of it, interpreted dayglo’s instruction. I will try AGAIN.

  • #196311

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic
  • #196312

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic
  • #196313

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I GIVE UP! I swear I copied every last blip. :retard:

  • #196314

    DayGloScooter
    Participant
    Neophyte
    =http://greeceishome.gr/forums/posting.php?mode=reply&f=8&t=6889 Grrr<a href="

    Almost right Kiwi. There are always two sets of square brackets, one to start and one to finish. The bit with the =http address goes inside the first set, and the second set always has a / , like this

    " class="bbcode_url">

    Almost right Kiwi. There are always two sets of square brackets, one to start and one to finish. The bit with the =http address goes inside the first set, and the second set always has a / , like this

     Grrr
  • #196249

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I HATE IT!….am flashing back and forth trying to copy your one, eyes are terrible, am having ANOTHER cup of tea now and will look at it yet again.

    It’s why men can read maps.

  • #196250

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    If anyone is still awake for a couple hours more, might be worth watching if we get hit or not by the asteroid.
    http://live.slooh.com/ clcik on the letter i underneath for a description. Cool site.

  • #196251

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    @kiwi wrote:

    If anyone is still awake for a couple hours more, might be worth watching if we get hit or not by the asteroid.
    http://live.slooh.com/ clcik on the letter i underneath for a description. Cool site.

    Haven’t watched it yet, but we’re still here, so unfortunately it seems that we weren’t hit and mankind is still here! :roll:
    Never mind…. better luck with the next one perhaps? :mrgreen:
    Though I’m quite sure that we’ll manage to end the world without the able assistance of any asteroid, hemorrhoid, rheumatoid, or any other sort of oid! 😯

  • #196252

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Trial number 432

    =http://greeceishome.gr/forums/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=6889&start=45]please work

    Just to let you know am going back and forth looking at your example dayglo which by the time I scroll back to my one, I can’t remeber which way or where the brackets are, and…I have a foreign keyboard that I have no idea where the brackets are so I am using the ones in the tools above. How can something obviously so simple to all be so dammed complicated…worse, I need to try and remember what I did if I got it right…posting now!

  • #196253

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Do you believe it? :retard:

    I have just checked with your last line of how it should be an it is exactly as your example. Am I blind? I feel a song coming to mind…’Don’t give up on me baby….’

    Well at least I am humble enough to make a public fool of myself and give thousands of viewers a laugh for the day 😀 Cuppa time.

  • #196254

    GlennB
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Be sure to use DayGlo’s 2nd example. You’re closing the first [url, making it <a href=" immediately when it should be [url= followed by the content of the link.” class=”bbcode_url”> immediately when it should be [url= followed by the content of the link.

  • #196255

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    OK, I cannot just sit here and do nothing any longer… :roll:

    (url= http://www.independent.co.uk/news) article (/url)

    If you replace the ( and the ) by [ and ] you should get

    article

  • #196256

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Ok thanks guys…Murphy decrees the example is now on the previous page so I can’t scroll to it as I type.

    This time

  • #196257

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    :mrgreen: YAYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY !!!!!!!!!! Finally!

    Now all I need to do is TRY to remember what I did which of course will be forgotten straight after the next cuppa.

    Thanks for the patience.

    So let’s move on now. On the tax front, I just heard from a reliable source that if you have ANY income whatsoever, even a mere 50 euros a month, and…you have a small rental that you receive rent for, you will have to pay the taxes up front, now get the sweetest part, even if the tenant does not pay you the rent.

    My question is, ‘Are they totally mad?’

  • #196247

    DayGloScooter
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Nice job Kiwi

    @kiwi wrote:

    So let’s move on now. On the tax front, I just heard from a reliable source that if you have ANY income whatsoever, even a mere 50 euros a month, and…you have a small rental that you receive rent for, you will have to pay the taxes up front, now get the sweetest part, even if the tenant does not pay you the rent.

    My question is, ‘Are they totally mad?’

    Rental income is heavily taxed, so it wouldn’t surprise me if this is true. I’m sure that if you prove non-payment of rent you’ll be able to claim a partial refund. If it encourages people to offload property and deflates the market then I have no problem with it. Landlordism is a particularly unpleasant side of capitalism.

    Then again, your average Greek loves a rumour and conspiracy theory. I heard one saying that the banks are to be directly connected to the tax office, with automatic withdrawal of funds to pay assessed debts and penalties.
    Ludicrous – there would be total capital flight and banking collapse, yet my Greek informer swore that he heard it directly from a friend of a minister.

  • #196248

    No Wall
    Participant
    Neophyte

    @DayGloScooter wrote:

    I’m sure that if you prove non-payment of rent you’ll be able to claim a partial refund.

    Then again, your average Greek loves a rumour and conspiracy theory. I heard one saying that the banks are to be directly connected to the tax office, with automatic withdrawal of funds to pay assessed debts and penalties.

    Non-payment would be no help – if you have a rental contract and the tenant doesn’t pay you still get taxed on the income you ought to have received (even if you didn’t receive it). I think one way of addressing this is to somehow assign the non-payments to the tax office. I’m not a landlord but I’ve heard of many people with this problem.

    As regards banks the tax offices already have the ability to monitor transactions and review accounts on line – I recall this came in last year.

  • #196395

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Agree with all of your comments No Wall, hat is what I have heard also. My source was an accountant. Lets not forget the Haratzi that is charged on all properties now whether they give income or not so if you inherit a place and are unemployed and struggling to make ends meet with your own famly, you have the extra load of Granny’s beach house that you inherited.

    Dayglo, you are of course correct that you could possibly go to the tax office and argue it out. LOTSA LUCK! Have you seen the lines of angry people standing a block away from outside the tax offices, waving papers and with a zillion mistakes and queries? The entire government has gone mad and are just making laws with no thought of the effects on people or logic.

  • #196401

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Interesting name No Wall…got me wondering.

    So where are you Brenda?

  • #196402

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    Personally I’d rather pay a fine over my being late filing my tax return (I have to wait for the final assessment from the Norwegians in order to avoid double taxation) than pay on time and then take my chances that the Greek tax-office will actually refund my payment afterwards. :roll:

    Posession is 99.9999999% of the law and once they got their hands on it I fear it’ll be nigh impossible to get any of it back.. :

    But I’think I’ll reconsider the idea of renting the village house out… 😐 😐

  • #196403

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Quite so ian. It is not only getting the moeny back from them it is all the red tape! As for renting the house in the village if it is just for a holiday period, maybe it would be simpler to have a quiet arrangement with an expat tenant to pay in cash and not get involved with all the craziness. Do you actually consider letting out your place in Halkida sometimes?

  • #196404

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    Quite so ian. It is not only getting the moeny back from them it is all the red tape! As for renting the house in the village if it is just for a holiday period, maybe it would be simpler to have a quiet arrangement with an expat tenant to pay in cash and not get involved with all the craziness. Do you actually consider letting out your place in Halkida sometimes?

    Well, I was thinking to just have it as a sort of a guesthouse for relatives and friends who’re visiting (it’s about 15 minutes from where we live) but Yolanda had this notion of putting it up for rental too as a holliday home.

    You’re right, maybe just quietly to foreigners is the better idea.

    It’s not in Halkida though, it’s in Paleochori (population must be about 25), just up from Rovies in North Evoia.

  • #196405

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Nice…how many minutes from a beach? Can one walk to the water. Thats the big thing for summer in Greece. How big is it? You never know we might get some interest :))

  • #196406

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Since am not sleeping AGAIN, had a Google to see where it is. Found the village about 4km inland from Rovies. Seems a pretty place. You look across to it from Kammena Vourla on the mainland coast and Ag Konstantinos where I think there is a ferry that takes you to Evoia. I remember how the water was hot in places with underground hot springs. Its all a seismic area, like most of Greece I guess.

  • #196407

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    Since am not sleeping AGAIN, had a Google to see where it is. Found the village about 4km inland from Rovies. Seems a pretty place. You look across to it from Kammena Vourla on the mainland coast and Ag Konstantinos where I think there is a ferry that takes you to Evoia. I remember how the water was hot in places with underground hot springs. Its all a seismic area, like most of Greece I guess.

    The ferry is from Arkitsa actually (or Glyfa if you come from the north).
    Aidipsos (where the Arkitsa ferry berths) has the hot-springs.

    Coming from Athens I’d choose to get to the island via the bridge at Halkida. The drive through the mountains to North Evoia is breathtakingly beautiful (unless you’re prone to car-sickness).

    This is Paleochori:

  • #196289

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Very Pretty, it almost looks like lavender is growing. I love the trees in the background with what looks like grass underneath rather than the usual dirt and stones. Bet there are heaps of happy snakes there. So how many rooms is the house?

    Meanwhile its just me and you online again…this forum is going to die if an effort is not made and it’s a pity. You can see that people read it but no one fronts up to write a few words C’mon just chat..as the thread says, about nothing in particular.

    Anyone got some insomnia remedies? Just ate a large piece of moreish cheese, meant to be marvelous. insomnia
    Ahem….

  • #196290

    Stella
    Participant
    Hoplite

    Kiwi, a man needs 8 hours sleep a day, and anything he gets at night is bonus! My problem is staying awake during the day and I sleep all night. Do you have any idea what prevents you from sleeping? It must be depressing to lie awake so often.

  • #196321

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Hi Stella nice to see you back again reb_bravo Not sure if you think I am a man suggesting men need 8 hours sleep.

    I am female and therefore prone to multitasking, worrying, thinking, feeling,wondering, curious, planning whereas men are more one dimensional therefore I reckon therein lies the reason why more men sleep anywhere at any time while we women can only glare with narrow eyes and think evil thoughts as he sleeps in front of TV, on a plane, while waiting in the car, while reading a newspaper etc etc. Men can however read maps efficiently and find their way to the correct exit in a large department store. Some women may suggest owning a compass might be an easier solution than owning a man of course adn I am sure opinion is very divided on this question.

    My problem is more of attitude, it seems such an awful waste of time sleeping and therefore very boring when the mind is so busy, so I get up and wander to the computer or watch TV until exhaustion hits and I can sleep easily. Valerian can work but I keep forgetting to buy some.

  • #196322

    Stella
    Participant
    Hoplite

    Should have said a person, rather than a man! Yes, I realise you are female. I think spatial awareness is also different for women at least that is my excuse for total inability to parallel park the car! I am useless when it comes to map reading also, in fact you could say I am not much use at all since I am very happily retired and spend long periods of time in our house in Greece.

  • #196323

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    I am female and therefore prone to multitasking, worrying, thinking, feeling,wondering, curious, planning whereas men are more one dimensional therefore I reckon therein lies the reason why more men sleep anywhere at any time while we women can only glare with narrow eyes and think evil thoughts as he sleeps in front of TV, on a plane, while waiting in the car, while reading a newspaper etc etc.

    Wonder how come that to Yolanda eight hours sleep is a short night (usually nine to ten hours) and to me six hours of sleep is a long night (usualy four to five hours)? ic_confused

    Maybe I’m really in touch with my female side… 😛

  • #196324

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Maybe I’m really in touch with my female side… 😛

    Steady Ian, nearly too much information there! 😆

    If I go to North Evoia again (two years ago you were away ic_sad ) I would consider your little pad and can say it is a glorious and green part of Greece! The views on the drive from the bridge North are spectacular and the top of the island is fantastic for a get away from it all holiday but still (almost) with something for everyone! (unless your into mass tourism things)

    Kiwi, a friend of mine has the same insomnia troubles but found 5-HTP Complex a great help. For me a bottle of Scotland’s best sends me to sleep very quickly…………zzzzzzzzzzzz

  • #196325

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    Welcome to it. :nod:

    Number of rooms is a bit difficult to answer.
    We ripped the guts out and made some major changes.
    The ground floor is effectively 3 rooms, a large kitchen and a bathroom but doesn’t have any internal doors (OK, the bathroom has a door).
    head05 – Looking through.jpg[/attachment:2fd00lc1]

    The first floor has the large “master” bedroom and the veranda.

    I can post more pics if anyone wants to see them…

  • #196326

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Wow how cool is that ian. Nice place. How many people can it sleep is probably a more relevant question. A picture paints a thousand words ian so it won’t do any harm, already you have one customer from Scotland via my curiosity…my commision is 5%

    Yes six hours sleep if that is more than enough for me too. Must be because I am old. They say the older one is the less sleep one needs. Your Yolanda must be young and needs more sleep :)) Ahh you fellas with your trophy wives.

    Stella, getting lost is my forte. I can get lost a block away from home. Especially in Athens where if it is flat there is no point of reference and I can travel for hours in circles (after a while I get to thinking haven’t i been to this spot before). Example I could walk up the street say in Evangielistrias off Ermou…go into a shop, come out, and be heading the same way I just came from instead of going forward. One of my daughters has the same disease so it’s in the DNA. There is no known cure :roll:

    Kolo I had never heard of the HTP and looked it up 5 htp (is a natural supplement that comes from a plant, that helps regulate your mood by increasing serotonin levels.) Sounds like a good thing, I will see if I can get some. Lack of Serotonin is very likely the culprit since am not getting any sun at all and I know that it does have an effect. As for anxiety, when you have kids and grandkids, anxiety is a normal state! I keep repeating to myself ‘three cats.’ (translated it means people should not have children they should adopt three cats instead).

    Anyway its nice to see someone chatting. Come on out the rest of you.

  • #196327

    Sancho the Fat
    Participant
    Neophyte

    @kiwi wrote:

    Forgot…if anyone wants to vote about the Parthenon Marbles, here is the link

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/poll/2014/feb/12/george-clooney-elgin-marbles-monument-men-poll

    Ian do not remind me of how stupid I am in not remembering how to shorten the links AGAIN.

    Members might be interested in this –

    The Latest Scheme for the Parthenon
    Mary Beard
    The Parthenon Enigma
    by Joan Breton Connelly
    Knopf, 485 pp., $35.00

    In March 1816 a Select Committee of the British House of Commons met to decide the fate of “The Earl of Elgin’s Collection of Sculptured Marbles; etc.” Whatever high hopes or greedy intentions had driven Elgin to take these sculptures from the Athenian Acropolis in the first place, the whole enterprise—with the huge cost of the excavation, the removal of some precious slabs from the Parthenon itself, and the transport back from Greece to England—had ruined him. He was close to bankruptcy and his only option was to sell his marbles to the government. The asking price was £74,000.

    The Select Committee was, of course, concerned with fixing a good price (in the end Elgin had to accept just £35,000). But it was also worried about Elgin’s legal title to the collection. The government was not interested in acquiring stolen property, and so—as the published account of the proceedings shows—they quizzed him at length on whether he had proper authority to remove the sculptures and whether he had abused his public position as British ambassador to the Ottoman Empire to stitch up a private deal for the marbles. When they were broadly satisfied on that score, the committee members turned to the trickier question of artistic merit. Put simply, were the Parthenon sculptures worth buying at all?

    To answer that, the committee proceeded with rather quaint nineteenth-century diligence, summoning a dozen leading artists, architects, and antiquarians of the day to give their verdict on the sculptures’ quality. Overall they were enthusiastic enough for the committee to recommend purchase for a bargain sum. But the transcript of their comments reveals that, when pressed hard by their parliamentary interrogators, many of these specialists were less confident about the quality of the whole collection than they at first appeared.

    The sculptor John Flaxman, for example, was keen on the marbles becoming public property, but could not bring himself—when directly asked—to rank even the best pieces above the famous Apollo Belvedere in the Vatican (a perverse judgment by today’s taste). Richard Payne Knight, an antiquarian who was admittedly no particular friend of Elgin, judged even the “finest works in this Collection” to be no higher than “the second rank” of great art—and some pieces he considered decidedly inferior, probably later Roman additions and “of little value except from their local interest.”

    These awkwardly tentative responses are a useful reminder that the Parthenon and its sculptures have not always been the object of our unquestioned admiration. In fact, it is not only the slightly perplexed artists of early-nineteenth-century London—still unfamiliar with “original” Greek fifth-century style—who have had their doubts about the quality. A hundred years later the Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore is reputed to have wept at the sight of the Parthenon, not overcome with its aesthetic power, but horrified by its barbarity. And Peter Green hints at the love-hate relationship many classicists have with this hallowed icon of Western culture when he tells how in the early 1960s—after a long lunch with William Golding in downtown Athens—the pair decided to go up to “the bloody Parthenon.” They sat down on the Acropolis, their backs to the monument, firmly gazing at the cement works of Eleusis, just visible in the distance.

    Joan Breton Connelly, in The Parthenon Enigma, has plenty of sensible things to say about modern appropriations of the Parthenon. Although she tends to take the “beauty” of the building for granted (there is no sign here of Green’s “bloody Parthenon”), she is shrewd enough to see that modern visitors and critics have projected all kinds of different values onto it. The Parthenon as a transcendent symbol of ancient and modern democracy—captured in the 1992 exhibition “The Greek Miracle,” in Washington and New York, with a gushing catalog introduction published under the name of George H.W. Bush—is just one version of this. For Cecil Rhodes, the Parthenon was a legitimation of (British) imperialism. For the leading lights of Hitler’s Germany, it was a high point of (Aryan) civilization, an association underlined by a series of chilling photo opportunities offered to prominent Nazis on the Acropolis.

    Connelly’s aim is to bypass these anachronisms and “to recover the primordial and original meaning of the Parthenon” in the setting of fifth-century-BC Athenian culture and religion. What did this vast temple to Athena “Parthenos,” the “Virgin,” signify when it was erected in the 440s and 430s BC? What was the message of its lavish—some critics at the time said “vulgar”—decoration, largely subsidized, as Rhodes was well aware, by the profits of Athens’s empire? What does this say about the sacred meaning of the “Sacred Rock” (a term Connelly repeatedly uses for the ancient “Acropolis,” even though it is a nineteenth-century coinage, never used, to my knowledge, in antiquity)?

    The pivot of her argument is a reinterpretation of the sculpted frieze that once circled the entire building above the colonnade. With its array of galloping horsemen, charioteers, offering-bearers, and sacrificial animals, this has usually been identified as a representation of the procession that took place at the regular religious festival of the Panathenaia, making its way to the Acropolis in celebration of the goddess Athena. Connelly rejects this, to argue instead that the subject of the frieze is a myth of early Athens. What we see, she claims, are the preliminaries to a human sacrifice, when the daughter of one of the legendary kings of the city, Erechtheus, is sacrificed to ensure Athenian victory over an invading army. The procession depicts the celebrations that honored the girl’s noble act of self-sacrifice. It is not, in other words, a human scene at all, but a moment drawn from myth, and—to modern eyes—a shocking one at that.

    Connelly’s interpretation centers on the puzzling scene (now in the British Museum) originally aligned with the main entranceway of the temple, apparently the culmination of the procession. It shows an adult male figure exchanging a large piece of cloth with a child, who may be either a boy or a girl. The clearest diagnostic feature for the sex of the child is its bare buttock protruding from a loose robe—and a large amount of art-historical time and energy has been fruitlessly expended over the past decades in comparing this buttock to those of other girls and boys in classical art, with (unsurprisingly) no definitive answer.

    Next to the man, and with her back to him, stands an adult woman, facing two girls who carry stools on their heads. The traditional reading of the frieze, which goes back to the famous study of James Stuart and Nicholas Revett in the late eighteenth century, connects this with the presentation of a newly woven robe (peplos) to Athena—the high point of special, grander Panathenaiac celebrations, which took place every four years. This would mean that we are seeing the child (boy or girl) handing over the new peplos to some male religious official (perhaps the archon basileus, or “King Archon”), while behind him a priestess receives from other young cult servants the stools—on which she and her male partner will later sit.

    Coherent as it may seem, this interpretation is not without its problems. In general, a scene drawn from human life and ritual, rather than from myth, decorating a Greek temple is absolutely without parallel (though one might argue that the Parthenon was unique in so many ways that it could well have broken the “rules” in this respect too). More specifically, while the highlighting of the peplos in pride of place seems appropriate enough, the stool-bearers are a strange element to be given such prominence. Besides, looking beyond this scene to the procession itself, there are awkward mismatches between what we see on the frieze and what we know of the Panathenaic celebrations from other sources. Why do we find no “basket-bearer” leading the procession, a figure clearly attested in literary accounts? Why does the cavalry have such a prominent place on the frieze, when the backbone of the celebrations in the democratic city must surely have been the Athenian foot soldiers, or hoplites?

    There have been various attempts to meet these difficulties. Some art historians have tried to argue, for example, that the frieze is a flagrantly idealizing, rather than “real-life,” version of the festival (in which case, the prominence of the aristocratic cavalry is an interesting indication that even the radically democratic city was happy to see itself in aristocratic guise). Others have suggested that the sculptures depict the mythical first celebration of the Panathenaia, or some lightly “mythicized” version of the festival. This was the line taken by John Boardman in the last solution of the “enigma” to capture the popular imagination, though it has been largely forgotten and has been dropped by Boardman himself. Counting (more or less) 192 participants in the procession on the frieze, he hazarded that they were meant to represent the 192 Athenian warriors who died fighting the Persians at the Battle of Marathon in 490. This was, in other words, a memorial to the heroes of Athens’s most renowned—almost legendary—military victory.

    Connelly has long argued that the scene is much more mythic than that (despite the liberal use of such adjectives as “new” and “revisionary,” she has been making this case in seminars and articles for over twenty years). For her, the “peplos scene” has nothing to do with any presentation of a robe to Athena. The adult male figure is King Erechtheus, who has been told by an oracle that in order to save Athens from invasion he must sacrifice one of his daughters. The sexually indeterminate child is therefore the sacrificial girl who is receiving (rather than handing over) the material (which is to be her shroud, not a robe for the goddess). The fact that her buttock is visible is a hint that “she is in the process of changing clothes,” swapping her ordinary attire for “funerary dress.” The woman with her back to Erechtheus is his wife Praxithea, facing her two other daughters, who in a nasty twist to the story are also about to meet their end; for the girls had vowed that if any one of them were to die, the others would kill themselves. On top of their stools, we must imagine that they too are carrying their shrouds.

    The details of this interpretation rely heavily on a fragmentary play of Euripides, the Erechtheus, which dramatized the myth for performance in the late 420s BC, not long after the Parthenon was completed. We possess some 250 lines of it in all (roughly a fifth of the total), some quoted by later authors, but some key passages known only from a papyrus that was part of the wrapping of an Egyptian mummy and was first published in 1967. Connelly puts great emphasis on what appears to be a speech by Athena herself, near the end of the play, in which—after the Athenian victory against the invaders, but also after the death of Erechtheus in the fighting—the goddess appoints Praxithea her own priestess, and ordains a variety of honors for the dead girls and the king. It is these honors (choruses of maidens, honey offerings, cattle sacrifice, and so on) that—according to Connelly—provide a much better match than the Panatheneia for what is represented on the rest of the frieze. The cavalrymen fit better too; for they can now be seen as the heroic, aristocratic troops who won victory for their city under King Erechtheus.

    Connelly pushes the significance even further, though. Taking the frieze and Euripides’ play together, she argues that they reveal an aspect of “Athenian core values” that has generally escaped our notice: namely, the importance of self-sacrifice in the ideology of democracy. Athena’s words at the end of the play, so close in theme to the subject of the frieze, “reverberated in the Athenian psyche, expressing the very essence of the people’s self-understanding.” The death of the daughters of Erechtheus offered a model of ultimate good citizenship. Everyone, even women, must be prepared to die “for the common good.”

    When Connelly broached these ideas twenty years ago, many scholars (myself included) were quick to scoff. The Parthenon Enigma should cause us to hesitate a little. It is a careful, learned account and a good read, including some wonderful vignettes drawn from the modern history of the Parthenon—from the heroic achievements of Francis Vernon, who measured the building in the 1670s (before being hacked to death in Isfahan), to the feats of the young American Eugene Andrews, who in 1895 spent days perilously suspended from the building’s façade in a boatswain’s chair, in search of traces of a lost inscription. By pulling all the evidence together, the book makes clear that the arguments deserved to be taken more seriously than our first hasty judgements of them allowed. Nonetheless, I remain unconvinced that she has solved the “enigma” of the frieze, or even that seeing it as a mystery to be decoded is the right way of approaching a monument such as this.

    The first problem is that many of the individual pieces of evidence are much more fragile than she acknowledges. To be honest, it takes the eye of faith to see the tiny honeycombs that she manages to detect in a tray carried by one of the figures on the frieze (conveniently matching Athena’s instruction to honor the dead girls with honey). It is likewise hard to make out the shrouds supposedly piled on top of the stools of the two “sisters.” (“Sometimes a stool is not just a stool,” she writes hopefully; but I suspect that in this case they may be just that.) Nor are we any closer to being certain if the young person with the peplos/shroud is male or female. (Connelly’s reasoning is dangerously circular at this point: identification depends on the context, she insists, and if this is the story of Erechtheus, then it must be a girl.) Besides, as Garry Wills has observed,* since—as now seems certain—the frieze originally continued beyond the outer colonnade, into the main porch of the temple, and directly above the main door, it may be that the “peplos scene” was not the culmination at all; that final, sense-making scene may have been lost.

    Connelly is, anyway, far too confident of the centrality of the Erechtheus myth, and its representations, “in the Athenian psyche.” The casual reader might easily miss the fact that not a single surviving ancient writer connects the Parthenon frieze with the myth of Erechtheus; in fact, not a single one mentions the frieze at all. Although it has become the main focus of modern scholarly attention (largely, I suspect, because it has been given pride of place at eye level, both in the British Museum and in the Acropolis Museum in Athens), it was ignored by the ancients themselves; that is perhaps because it was very hard to see from ground level, perched up high, just under the ceiling, within the colonnade. Pausanias, who visited the Acropolis in the second century CE and described the Parthenon in his Guidebook to Greece, mentioned a statue of Erechtheus close to the temple. But even this did not prompt him to make any remark on the frieze or (on Connelly’s view) its identical subject matter.

    As for the importance of self-sacrifice in the ideology of democratic Athens, it is debatable how far there is anything specifically democratic in it (after all, antidemocratic Sparta was no less invested in the idea of the citizen being ready to give up his life for the sake of the community). And it is equally debatable that Euripides’ Erechtheus was, as Connelly tries to read it, any kind of charter for patriotism of that sort. It is true that one later writer does quote some lines from it in a self-serving, patriotic harangue, but we still have hardly enough of the text to be sure of the message of the play. Given what else we know of this ironic, subversive playwright, it is perhaps more likely (as some other critics have suggested) that he was calling the notion of such patriotism into question, or at least wondering about its cost in human life and suffering. Patriotic Praxithea appears bereft at the end of the play, her family wiped out.

    Most of Connelly’s earlier work has concentrated on this mythic reading of the frieze. The Parthenon Enigma goes beyond that—particularly in its attempts to trace much more systematically an “Erechtheus theme” through the other parts of the temple’s sculptural decoration, and through the decoration of other buildings on the Acropolis—among them the small temple dedicated to Erechtheus. There is plenty of learned and intricate argument here (Connelly knows the archaeology of the Acropolis as well as almost anyone else on earth); but again much of it is more fragile than she would like. At one point, for example, she tries to prove that the scene on the lost base of the vast gold and ivory cult statue of Athena (the real ancient high spot of the decoration) echoes the frieze by showing the birth, or the “crowning,” of the sacrificed daughter of Erechtheus.

    We know very little about this base except for some scarcely legible miniature replicas and brief descriptions given by Pausanias and Pliny the Elder in his Natural History. Both identify the scene as the birth of Pandora, the very first woman, who was specially constructed by a large group of gods to be a punishment for mankind (a neat fit with some of the overtly misogynistic iconography of other parts of the Parthenon). Connelly claims that both these authors made a mistake and got the wrong Pandora, presumably because they did not realize that this was also one of the names sometimes given (not so far as we can tell by Euripides) to Erechtheus’ youngest daughter. But if so, why on earth does Pliny, in an admittedly corrupt passage of Latin, refer to the “twenty gods and goddesses” being present (these must surely be the divine consortium who put Pandora together)? And in any case, neither author makes any mention of the more convenient “crowning.”

    But for Connelly more hangs on the thematic unity of the Parthenon’s decoration than at first appears. By the final chapter of her book, it has led into an impassioned argument for the reunification of the Parthenon marbles in Athens, and the return of Elgin’s collection from London. “The wholeness of the Parthenon demands our respect and warrants our every effort to reunify it.”

    There is one basic rule about the “Elgin Marble Controversy”: it is not straightforward (if it were, it would have been solved decades ago). There are bad arguments and woeful oversimplifications on both sides, and the whole question raises some of the biggest dilemmas of heritage and cultural property. It pits the desirable notion of the Universal Museum against the desirable aim of seeing a coherent ensemble of sculpture (whether or not united by the Erechtheus theme) put together again. Any serious historian who enters this controversy needs to recognize its complexity, at many different levels, and at every period. Sadly Connelly does not appear to.

    In her account Elgin comes across as a fairly run-of-the-mill grasping villain who took “an expansive view” of what he was allowed to remove from the Acropolis under his permit, while at the same time being beastly to his wife. The contemporary voices raised in protest at his actions are taken at face value. These include not only the famous polemic of Lord Byron (“Dull is the eye that will not weep to see/Thy walls defac’d, thy mouldering shrines remov’d/By British hands”) but also the lamentations of an eyewitness, Edward Daniel Clarke, the Cambridge mineralogist, who deplored the removal of some of the sculpture from the building (even the Turkish overseer shed a tear, he claims). Of course, this is powerful testimony.

    In fact, the standpoint of these nineteenth-century observers is never quite as simple as it seems. Connelly does not mention that the same Clarke was himself an avid “collector” who a few years earlier had stolen what he (wrongly) thought was an original statue by Pheidias from Eleusis, to howls of protests from the locals, though there were exuberant celebrations when he got it home. It is now in the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, modestly identified as a Roman caryatid. Even Byron (whose verse attacks on Elgin proved a useful commercial success) was not above hitching a ride out of Athens on one of the ships carrying Elgin’s marbles.

    But it is with modern attitudes that Connelly’s account descends almost to caricature. In the final pages she compares the British view of the Elgin Marbles to their view on foxhunting (“that most quintessential of elite British pastimes”). Attitudes toward both are changing, she claims. “To many [in Britain], the Elgin Marbles, like foxhunting, represent an overbearing past, one not worth hanging on to in a changing world.” She goes on to drag in the House of Lords.

    Once upon a time the Lords led the opposition to returning the marbles (and she quotes the admittedly preposterous lines of Lord Wyatt of Weeford in 1997: “My Lords, it would be dangerous to return the marbles to Athens…. The volatile Greeks might easily start hurling bombs around again”). But as the House of Lords is modernized, and hereditary peers are phased out and replaced by life peers, including such experts as the archaeologist Lord Renfrew, even there—she assures us—views happily move on. She does not appear to realize that the wicked Lord Wyatt was himself a life peer: the ex-Woodrow Wyatt, once a left-wing radical, later a maverick, self-ironic, and mischievous Thatcherite (“Lord Wyatt of Weevil” as the satirical magazine Private Eye used to dub him).

    I am afraid that the diligent and canny parliamentarians who debated the Elgin Marbles in 1816—under no illusions about the issues at stake in the sale, careful to interrogate Elgin on both his motives and paperwork, and foxhunters (I’d guess) to a man—would be dismayed to see how low the arguments have sunk here.

    http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2014/mar/06/latest-scheme-parthenon/?page=2

  • #196348

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Interesting Sancho. One could wonder if the ‘experts’ were paid to say the marbles had no merit? the fact remains that merit or not,the marbles are part of a building that was standing on Greek soil and were selectively stripped off, chipped away at and prised off. They were not a painting hanging on a wall sold to the highest bidder.

    Now if I came along and wink, wink asked the Mayor of Kalamata if I could cut off that nice lion’s head you had carved over the portico of your house, passed a bit of money over, and then set it up in my house in London and then I died, and when you found out who had it, you wanted it back; should anyone really care if the lions head was a work of art or not or if it was better or worse than someone elses lion’s head in Rome. Nope…the fact remains that it was cut off an existing erection (no laughing please but you get the picture).

    The museum should return the original and instead display the plaster casts of the marbles that Athens now has to display.

  • #196408

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    Interesting Sancho. One could wonder if the ‘experts’ were paid to say the marbles had no merit? the fact remains that merit or not,the marbles are part of a building that was standing on Greek soil and were selectively stripped off, chipped away at and prised off. They were not a painting hanging on a wall sold to the highest bidder.

    Now if I came along and wink, wink asked the Mayor of Kalamata if I could cut off that nice lion’s head you had carved over the portico of your house, passed a bit of money over, and then set it up in my house in London and then I died, and when you found out who had it, you wanted it back; should anyone really care if the lions head was a work of art or not or if it was better or worse than someone elses lion’s head in Rome. Nope…the fact remains that it was cut off an existing erection (no laughing please but you get the picture).

    The museum should return the original and instead display the plaster casts of the marbles that Athens now has to display.

    Hear, hear…

  • #196220

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    …Cor Blimey ! Time for a snack I think – Dry cure streaky bacon glazed with Messinian honey, left to cool & makes a lovely “Nibble” :))

  • #196221

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Yay, sundodge is back with his recipes reb_bravo That looks crunchy, yummy, wickedly bad for us. I so admire your smallgoods talents.

  • #196186

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    @kiwi wrote:

    ………. I so admire your smallgoods

    I didn’t see any pic of sunnyboys ‘smallgoods’? Was the picture deleted by admin due to it’s pornographic nature or are his ‘smallgoods’ so small that we can’t see them? :roll:

  • #196187

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    😆

  • #196351

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Ever notice how all potential wars etc start around Spring? This thing in the Ukraine is getting very disturbing, I foresee consequences for Greece if it escalates; the Aegean being the road to the Turkish Straits. One can only hope that the camaraderie and support shown on TV between the new ‘rulers’ in Kiev and the Neo Nazis of Cyprus and Greece will not be a signal to add a spark to the already singeing anger in Greece.

    If one was the big policeman in the sky, would it not be a great opportunity to kill a number of oil and gas rich birds with one stone…?

    Insomnia gives one a longer time to ponder important matters.

  • #196352

    DayGloScooter
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Ukraine:
    I wonder if the news-dominating revolution was incited and promoted by Bashar al-Assad?
    Who’s he? Exactly my point

  • #196353

    The Grocer
    Participant
    Oracle

    @kiwi wrote:

    Ever notice how all potential wars etc start around Spring? This thing in the Ukraine is getting very disturbing, I foresee consequences for Greece if it escalates; the Aegean being the road to the Turkish Straits. One can only hope that the camaraderie and support shown on TV between the new ‘rulers’ in Kiev and the Neo Nazis of Cyprus and Greece will not be a signal to add a spark to the already singeing anger in Greece.

    If one was the big policeman in the sky, would it not be a great opportunity to kill a number of oil and gas rich birds with one stone…?

    Insomnia gives one a longer time to ponder important matters.

    Can you really blame Putin for protecting his naval fleet in The Crimea? If some of those ships were to fall into the hands of extremists I dread to think of the consequences….

    I listen to news channels and to my knowledge few have given time to the fact the people in The Crimea have asked Russia for protection, if the Russian forces stand off stops civil unrest in The Crimea seeing what has happened elsewhere in the world then if I were living there, I’d want it……

  • #196354

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I agree Grocer. Funny how its Ok to put a ‘peacekeeping force/no flyzone’ etc in place if you are a big Western power but if anyone else dares to do it they are deemed invaders. From what I have heard the 100k Greeks who have been in the Crimea for many years are rather happy that Russia is ‘protecting’ them since the alternative could be an ethnic cleansing not of the relligious kind but the ‘pure blood’ kind that the world experienced in the last great war. I can only imagine how frightening it would be to suddenly lose ones home and have to flee violence, to a future of tents, strvation and being persona non grata in every country you try to get asylum from.

    Dayglo IMHO everything that happens in the world is usually by Proxy to a greater power that waves the big stick and has fingers in the media we are fed which we so gullibly absorb. I like reading the news from many sources to make up my own picture, but even then, the wily ways of foreign politics is difficult to fathom.

    Journalists are taught at school, ‘to get to the truth…Follow the money.’

    This Pawn in the Grand Scheme of things watched The Oscars all night for some R and R. Any other mad people out there.

  • #196342

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Internet speeds in all coutries… http://www.netindex.com/download/allcountries/

  • #196343

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    @kiwi wrote:

    Internet speeds in all coutries… http://www.netindex.com/download/allcountries/

    Interesting Kiwi, but I’m not so sure that it’s accurate!
    We certainly don’t get anywhere near 24mbps in the UK, even with our office business line!
    Also, how can Romania claim more than double of the UKs inflated claim? Romania claims the 3rd fastest in the world at 56.66mbps???? 😯 Makes one wonder why all the Romanians would want to leave and come to the UK, Greece, etc? 😕
    Just did a speed check and got around 12mbps download and 0.7mbps upload! :

  • #196347

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Beats me kp maybe its an average figure. I noticed NZ was only 19 and Australia 14 which is very low, but down there it figures!

  • #196344

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Horrid about the Malaysian airlines saga. Felt really sad looking at the PDF of the passengers. Somehow it hits you more when you see pages of names and ages. Daughter was enroute to NZ while it was all happening and I was watching her flight on Flightaware…as if keeping an eye on it would dare anything to happen.

    You know how everyone keeps telling you how safe flying really is, well have a look at this site where there are almost daily instances, click on each item to bring up the story…

    http://aviation-safety.net/index.php

    Got you a bit more nervous now?

  • #196345

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    And look at this for that particular type of plane. Yet all we hear is how safe they all are.
    http://www.aeroinside.com/incidents/type/b772/boeing-777-200

  • #196346

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    One of our rare native parrots. Very cute. Check out the video with Stephen Fry near the end of the article
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/saving-a-crushed-egg-with-tape-and-glue-why-you-should-care-about-the-kakapo-9181945.html

  • #196202

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Boring lot in here these days. Not a peep!

    I am again packing my bags, BA on Weds to go over to Blighty……flying….on an airplane : Frankly after all I have been reading, I would rather go by donkey. My daughter said the ticket was cheap. Was that a clue to the condition of the plane. Notice when they sell you the tickets online, they never tell you what plane type you will be on until you check in. Very cunning.

  • #196203

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    Boring lot in here these days. Not a peep!

    I am again packing my bags, BA on Weds to go over to Blighty……flying….on an airplane : Frankly after all I have been reading, I would rather go by donkey. My daughter said the ticket was cheap. Was that a clue to the condition of the plane. Notice when they sell you the tickets online, they never tell you what plane type you will be on until you check in. Very cunning.

    Oh yes, airliner companies pull some cunning stunts… ic_wink

  • #196319

    DayGloScooter
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Apparently, the “animated GIF of tumbleweed which didn’t precisely conform to every nuance of reality” some time ago, is now even less accurate…
    @The Times wrote:

    Man, 80, held hostage by tumbleweed
    Sometimes the plants appear silently overnight, amassing in vast numbers outside human habitations in scenes that might have been plucked from The Day of the Triffids.
    One victim recently escaped to tell his story.
    Wilford Ransom, 80, a pensioner from Clovis, New Mexico, had awoken to find his windows mysteriously dark. He tried to open his front door. It would not budge. Then he realised: he was being held hostage by an avalanche of tumbleweeds.
    The Hollywood image of a lone tumbleweed rolling through the West is out of date. This year, a blistering drought has allowed the plants to go on a rampage from Texas to Colorado.
    In New Mexico the military has been called out to clear choked towns, while in Colorado roads have been cleared by bulldozers. In Texas the “accumulations are historic in scale . . . posing a Sisyphean clean-up task,” reported The Wall Street Journal.
    The culprit is a plant that is as much an American icon as California’s giant redwoods or the saguaro cacti of Arizona. However, the tumbleweed is actually a Eurasian interloper.
    After the seeds mature in late autumn, the stem of the bush separates from the root, allowing the plant to be blown away. Seeds fall to the ground as the plant tumbles. This year those roaming plants have snowballed into tangled knots big enough to block roads.
    As for Mr Ransom, he was rescued after he called a police emergency hotline and a neighbour helped to dig him out through his garage. “Those Westerns don’t do ’em justice,” he said of the tumbleweeds and their portrayal on screen. “I don’t want to experience anything like that again. It was a little scary.”

  • #196335

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I will add that to my list of things to be afraid of…. :retard:

    Amazing outcome from such an inocuous looking thing. I guess with it being spiny and sharp like a roll of barbed wire it would cling to any other one it bumped into and then another would bump into that with the winds and presto you have instant fence.

    For some reason it reminded me of the cowboy movies I would watch at the Saturday matinees as a kid. There were always tumbleweeds and bad Mexicans with evil moustaches and a guy strumming a guitar singing the tumbleweed song of which i can only remember the last few words of the chorus.

  • #196328

    The Grocer
    Participant
    Oracle

    @kiwi wrote:

    Boring lot in here these days. Not a peep!

    I am again packing my bags, BA on Weds to go over to Blighty……flying….on an airplane : Frankly after all I have been reading, I would rather go by donkey. My daughter said the ticket was cheap. Was that a clue to the condition of the plane. Notice when they sell you the tickets online, they never tell you what plane type you will be on until you check in. Very cunning.

    ….and the pilots name was PONTIUS :)

  • #196329

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Hehehe Grocer.

    Meanwhile my airplane is an Airbus, Yay! Checked it on flightradar site. One thing for sure, too much information is bad for the health. If I didn’t sleep before, now I have ample reason to keep awake checking all the latest theories on the missing plane and even more interesting going to some of the conspiracy links provided by the readers. Some certainly make you think. My favourite in all this is that Richard Quest did an interview with the pilot just a couple weeks back. Out of millions of pilots worldwide and by demonic chance, Quest interviews the ONE pilot that is going to feature in the news the week after?

    Packing…fairy dress, glitter, magic wand, sparkly tiara, fairy wings, a red watch and most important thing…..a silver whistle. Told me she NEEDED one. My devious plan is to teach her to blow it hard every morning in daddys ear. 😈

  • #196330

    DayGloScooter
    Participant
    Neophyte

    WHOA! Go back a bit…
    @Kiwi wrote:

    …the tumbleweed song of which i can only remember the last few words of the chorus.

    Come on Kiwi, give us the bit you remember so we can find it on YouTube. I SO want to hear this.

  • #196331

    The Grocer
    Participant
    Oracle

    Yeh remember those…..YEE HAH

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UiSMyyj-Ac

  • #196332

    The Grocer
    Participant
    Oracle

    Oh gee, you got me in Cowboy mood now…………..

    My grandmothers love…………….
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCyuq-ofnPc

  • #196334

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    That’s it! Drifting along with the tumbling tumbleweed is the chorus of the song. No idea why it stuck in my mind as a kid. Saturday matinees in Wellington were great affairs, all the kids licking toffee apples, fights as to who would sit in the FRONT seats always started by the Irish kids. Waiting to see the next episode of the Lone Ranger and Tonto. Standing up to God save the Queen. Kids these days don’t have anywhere near the fun we had. Ipad ipad.

    If anyone has grand kids, the Tiger store had this wonderful puppet set of Red riding Hood,the wolf, grandma and the woodcutter. Will try and attach photo off this blimmin ipad….can’t add it file is too big. Grrr, took the photo with ipad. No idea how to shrink it. Anyway, it’s a great present, most unusual and not at all expensive.

    Not packed, have read so much about planes and latest is that if the engine drops off, the pilot tells us trusting sheep only that we are having a WEE problem………he doesn’t tell you the truth! Argh! I will be suspicious of every announcement now including the fasten seat belts for a little turbulence. ic_confused This is the first plane trip that has me edgy after so many years of travel.

    Will watch the other YouTube tomorrow if I have time grocer! Clever you got the right one first pop.

  • #196333

    DayGloScooter
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Isn’t the whole “Singing Cowboy” genre just bizarre? How can that stick in your head? I managed 60 seconds, clicked it off, and have completely forgotten it already.

  • #196236

    The Grocer
    Participant
    Oracle

    Now DGS as I can see your such a big fan I have attached the full film from 1935 staring Gene Autry, Smiley Burnette, George ‘Gabby’ Hayes and Lucile Browne.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62-IxgnM21I

    and

    not to forget the score was used in the 1998 film The Big Lebowski…..opening scene attached

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHr4AIiHVyY

    of course if you were a Diana Ross fan you could always have:-

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUAxiR0a4Lk

    or perhaps Mike Nesmith from The Monkeys….

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoXqJQS2RWQ&feature=kp

    or Slim Whitman…

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8sjiV3U3XU

    E N J O Y ….. :)) :)) reb_popo

  • #196228

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Dayglo it stuck in my mind because of the words tumbling tumbleweed, onLy lyrics I remember. Good one grocer as always a mine of knowledge.

  • #196269

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I must share…my trip to Blighty was at the gate and decided a pee would be wise to avoid use in the plane. Went into the loo with ipad and purse in my hands and no shelf to put them on, so easiest was the sink. Set them on the sink dangling in………tinkle tinkle then time to wash hands, went to take away the bag and the ipad, and as I put my hand under the tap, it came on automatically…water pouring over the ipad, bag and my boarding card with the ink running and me shrieking, hand towels were nil and loo paper was the type that reluctantly allows you to drag one shredded piece out at a time while frantically reaching under said contraption for the new leader. A warning to you not to use the sink as a shelf :retard:

  • #196206

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    You wouldn’t believe it, in uk to look after the bubba, and helping daughter I faint onto a double aluminum planter and fall, hurt my ribs so badly could hardly breathe. Refused to go to hospital and resting with painkillers. Bruise the size of Gibraltar in lower ribs and growing to be the size of Eastern Europe. Am now worried they won’t let me fly in five days. Anyone had any experience of flying with cracked or injured ribs. When I get the chance will post a pic of the planter

  • #196204

    The Grocer
    Participant
    Oracle

    Apart from the pain (which will be really no worse than if you were not flying) and of course the long period of sitting you will be OK. Keep the “fresh” air on so you can maintain shallower breathing, which by now you will know is what you are tending to do to reduce the discomfort of the chest expanding more like when you take deep breaths……

    In all this I am assuming you have either badly bruised or “cracked” a rib. It would be VERY wise to have a quick X-Ray to eliminate and breaks that “could” have resulted in a “floating” bone. This would be more common on the lower two pairs ribs of the rib cage that are not connected by cartilage to the sternum

    what ever you do don’t sneeze…..O U C H…..

  • #196205

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    It’s as if you knew grocer…I have just sneezed three times, Agony! It is the lower ribs but they feel in place. Reason I am here is to help look after bub so daughter can get through quarter end at work so I don’t want to add to her stress by needing to go to hospital. Am hurting but coping. Martyr. Will deal with it next week after I go. Should be feeling slightly better by Saturdays flight.

  • #196336

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    What? Is everyone fasting for Easter and has no energy to post? It’s almost not worth clicking on the button to see who is still alive. Wake up – come back! but wait, the entire population of Greece is in lethargic mode and sitting obediently paying attention as their old way of life is being carnaged. Certainly no signs of a ‘Greek Spring’ on the horizon.

    Shall I entertain you with my cracked rib saga, or maybe share that I had burnt toast and tea for breakfast, reason is because the cheap toaster bought from Lidl turned out not so cheap since at the highest setting of seven, it still needs to be pressed down for a second toasting by which times it is SOMETIMES burnt. I was going to blame Merkel, but then saw that it was manufactured in China and desisted. However, it does still look very attractive with its white plastic sides and black trim which was the criteria used in buying it in the first place.

    So…how has your day been?

  • #196337

    The Grocer
    Participant
    Oracle

    So right Kiwi, no one posting at all………
    Well down here in the Peloponnese I was thinking of doing some gardening before heading off to the UK for a few months, but the ground is like rock as we have had hardly any rain for ages. Well that’s my excuse anyway!

    So today I’ve been searching for an electronic part for a PCB for my caravan, in the UK all of 22p….can I get one in Greece….NO !!! Will companies in the UK post….mostly NO, and those that will a £20 minimum order. This means no motor mover for the caravan, so I’ll have to get Mrs Grocer fit to push it when necessary !!

  • #196338

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    Oh, I’ve had all sorts of fun the last couple of days. :nod:

    At 17:00 on Tuesday I got a call that my presence was urgently needed in Edinburgh on Wednesday morning.
    A quick check learned that the earliest I could get there was by Turkish Airlines arriving in EBI 10:50.

    Obviously this meant I had to get my backside and further luggage into a taxi to Elefterios Venizelos by 18:00 in order to catch the evening flight to Istanbul. :roll:

    Once in Istanbul true efficiëncy whizzed me through passport control in 3 minutes shy of a full hour and I finally made it to my hotel by 01:30.
    Back to the airport at 05:45 and off to Edinburgh… :)
    The waiting for passport control in Edinburgh was significantly better, roughly 30 minutes.
    While I was awaiting my turn my phone rang. My agency telling me the job had been cancelled! :roll:

    Some e-mailing to-and-fro with the travel agent got me on a late afternoon flight to Amsterdam with a connecting red-eye via Zürich on Thursday morning. 😐

    Back in Athens at 13:30 and back home at 16:30. :))
    Tour d’Europe in under 48 hours… 😀 😀

  • #196339

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    Ian, presume you’re not out of pocket for the wasted trip ! 😥

    How’s my day been ? Well, been waiting for a parcel from UK which the tracking system says was in Athens last Tuesday but still hasn’t travelled the last few k’s to Agios Nikolaos, Mani.

    Plus the strip of land in front of us (owned by an absentee landlord in Kalamata) which hasn’t been touched for twelve years was recently fenced off and the olive trees severely hacked back. Now the weeds are like triffids looking over our fence. I think our gardener will be “trespassing” on Monday to strim said weeds.

    8)

  • #196340

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @the reiver wrote:

    Ian, presume you’re not out of pocket for the wasted trip ! 😥

    Nah, all expenses paid plus three full onshore dayrates; no complaints.. :))

  • #196341

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Grocer why don’t you get the part sent to a friend in uk and get them to post it to you. May cost a lot less. They expect rain these days so maybe wait a bit.

    Ian that was an amazing runaround but while you are being paid, who cares. How come you get through security so fast, I always get the dork that wants me to take off my shoes, my watch bomb and do an invasive pat down. I feel like giving her a whopping slap. Greek security would not let me take a sealed jar of bought visino jam one time…insisted it was liquid! I turned the jar upside down and nothing happened but ohh no. Decided arguing was not wise as seen too many get banned. I did however feel like dropping it on the floor.

  • #196355

    The Grocer
    Participant
    Oracle

    @The Grocer wrote:

    So today I’ve been searching for an electronic part for a PCB for my caravan, in the UK all of 22p….can I get one in Greece….NO !!! Will companies in the UK post….mostly NO, and those that will a £20 minimum order. This means no motor mover for the caravan, so I’ll have to get Mrs Grocer fit to push it when necessary !!

    Thanks to a cam board member (you know who you are) who got the part and sent it to me from the UK I am happy to report Mrs Grocer will not have to push the caravan as the motor mover is now mended!!!

  • #196356

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @The Grocer wrote:

    @The Grocer wrote:
    So today I’ve been searching for an electronic part for a PCB for my caravan, in the UK all of 22p….can I get one in Greece….NO !!! Will companies in the UK post….mostly NO, and those that will a £20 minimum order. This means no motor mover for the caravan, so I’ll have to get Mrs Grocer fit to push it when necessary !!

    Thanks to a cam board member (you know who you are) who got the part and sent it to me from the UK I am happy to report Mrs Grocer will not have to push the caravan as the motor mover is now mended!!!

    Good for you! 😀

    Just think of how scary it would be to have a Mrs Grocer around strong enough to push a caravan around 😯
    (how much trouble would she then have pushing a Grocer around….? :( )

    :mrgreen:

  • #196136

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Anyone else like Billy Conelly? Was sad to hear he has Parkinsons now.

  • #196137

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    Anyone else like Billy Conelly? Was sad to hear he has Parkinsons now.

    Still have the “Humblebums” album somewhere (with Gerry Rafferty).

    Billy himself would probably have some snide remarks about having Parkinson.

    Is it better to have Parkinson or Alzheimer?

    Alzheimer’s better ’cause it’s better to have another after you forgot you already had a drink than to spill half of it in your lap…
    😉

  • #196138

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Not sure I want either. I had a friend in NZ who had Parkinsons and that I used to visit. It was the strangest thing…He would freeze while walking and his brain would not allow him to move forward, but…if you put your foot out in front of his as if to trip him up, he would begin to walk again. A walk anywhere with him looked ever so funny with him taking four steps, and me sticking my foot out as if to trip him up. It must have looked hilarious. He died at 55.

  • #196139

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    My husband has been in a nursing home for 5 years and I’ve had lots of exposure to both dementia and Parkinson’s. Parkinson’s is worse, by far.

  • #196141

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @brenda wrote:

    My husband has been in a nursing home for 5 years and I’ve had lots of exposure to both dementia and Parkinson’s. Parkinson’s is worse, by far.

    I’m sorry, Brenda.
    I certainly didn’t want to hurt anyone’s feelings by making light of the subject.

  • #196142

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Nice to see you back Brenda. How difficult for you. Very sad to know. Each of us has our own cross to bear in life. I have a younger brother in Canada who has been in a coma for 25 years. He was around thirty when it happened.

    Selfish as it may sound, we always feel so grateful it’s the other guy that has something horrid. At least at our age we have been there, done that, and every extra day is a gift. Yesterday a 13 year old boy in Athens got killed in one of those balloon things at a Lunar Park. I couldn’t help but think how unfair life can be when some live to 90 and others are taken away before they have a chance to shave.

    OK enough moroseness. I need to pile up all the contents of my handbag which is scattered on the bed (to be sorted and ignored all day). This means said pile must now be shifted to another temporary place so I can sleep. How can so much junk accumulate in one bag…when I tipped it all out, the pile looked larger than the bag it was in. Someone needs to invent a handbag tidy filer.

    I refuse to divulge the weight of said bag but the straps leave a clear indentation on the shoulder. :

  • #196144

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    So sorry about your brother, kiwi. Where in Canada is he? I’m in Ontario.

  • #196147

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Edmonton Brenda. Car got hit by a train. Am thinking of going over some time this year. He responds when I or the kids have visited, as if he understood our presence when we were announced.

  • #196157

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    Tragic situation, kiwi. I hope you get the chance to make the trip. I’m sure it’s very upsetting to you when you go, but Alberta is a lovely province.

  • #196127

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Surely the weather is not that great that you don’t come into GIH any more. :(

  • #196128

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Lest we forget in all the turmoil and drama the politicians throw at us…

    http://www.kathimerini.gr/764059/gallery/multimedia/video/ena-ateleiwto-ta3idi-sthn-omorfia-kai-ton-politismo

  • #196125

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    Lest we forget in all the turmoil and drama the politicians throw at us…

    http://www.kathimerini.gr/764059/gallery/multimedia/video/ena-ateleiwto-ta3idi-sthn-omorfia-kai-ton-politismo

    Could we really forget? But still, it’s a beuatiful reminder… 😀

  • #196126

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    Thanks for the beautiful video, kiwi. No matter how often I return, that country still takes my breath away. I don’t think of it as “visiting” anymore…I think of it as “coming home”.

  • #196124

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Agree. Now if we can just get rid of the wankers running the place :finger:

    I remember my daughter years back going on a tour of Europe and bringing back an album of photos of each place….including Germany and those other place around it. Turning the pages of the album suddenly the colours changed and the brightness of the photos shone out, and guess what, it was the Greek photos. The light is brilliant and the water is so blue.

  • #196123

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    You may want to take a look at this site too.

    My place is actually (sort of) vissible on it if you know where to look for it.

    I have it starting on the north-west Evoian coastline but it gives you some good coastal views in the rest of the country too.

  • #196120

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    Thanks Ian, really enjoyed that!

  • #196121

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Wow ian that is one incredible site. I started clicking on other places as well as Evia and it struck me that Greece is empty! There is so much land and waterline without any inhabitants. The other thing that struck me was the clarity of the water, you could see deep into the bottom of the sea coast. Only thing missing are wee labels every now and then to pin point names of towns etc. Brilliant …will share this with others.

  • #196122

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic
  • #196130

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Is anyone else getting nagged by Hotmail to give a phone number? I can’t get into my account because of it and don’t want to give it because my number keeps changing according to where I am at the time. Also, people are complaining they are being hounded by telemarketers after doing this.
    Any ideas?

  • #196172

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    The hounding, as you call it will probably happen anyway. An unfortunate and, so far difficult to prevent, downside of modern life.

    I guess you will need to give them a phone number and then update it as you move. (or have you a Skype or similar VOIP number that would do for text contacts etc. ?) Not great but perhaps the only options? Unless there are other email systems out there that you could move to….and that would probably be entail hassle as well.

  • #196134

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    If the number isn’t actually used by Hotmail only for ’emergency contact’ , could you use a false number ?
    At least it would outwit the telemarketers !!

  • #196135

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    I’ve never been asked for a number…but I like Shazzie’s idea! I’ll keep that in mind.

  • #196133

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    …….excellent lateral thinking! reb_bravo

    Wot’s your number Shazzie? :)) 😉

  • #196132

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I thought of that, but have been locked out before for logging in from another country and had to do the big secret question thing which is about 15 years old. It doesn’t like me traveling. In such a case you have to prove who you are, and of course they would send the activation number to the phone number I registered at the time. I may have changed sim card to a local one as I do when I travel, and sometimes I might use a temp one, and with so many different sims, who can remember which number one gave them.
    Mata Hari you say?

  • #196173

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    Lordy Kiwi ! What an interesting globe-trotting life you lead !

    Now I’m stumped for a helpful answer.
    Any chance Hotmail themselves might offer an answer ?

  • #196146

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Globetrotting emerges because of loved ones with wanderlust and never in one place shazzie! It plays havoc on my life since there is always that 6month+1 day residency rule everywhere. I am always in limbo and technology doesn’t like it. I need to extend my NZ license…they want proof of where I live and a bill to prove it. By the time they receive the application by snail mail, I will have moved off again. Argh!

    Ever tried writing to hotmail…the writing is easy, the finding WHERE to contact someone is not.

  • #196145

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric
  • #196175

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Who’d have thought… http://www.medicaldaily.com/after-texting-girlfriend-too-much-dark-chinese-man-suffers-detached-retina-285640

    The bit that sparked my interest was that looking at the sun can also cause detachment.

  • #196158

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    About the Hotmail asking for verification phone number question I had above. What I have learned is that you CANNOT bypass this and get to your mailbox and worse is that many people who travel a lot are having the same issues with being locked out each time they change situation. Complaints all over the net on this one.

    So…in case it happens to you, you need at least to have another email address…preferably not a hotmail one as the same could happen there too. I made a Yahoo one with a convoluted (forced to) password I will never remember, and Hotmail sent a code to that. Where they asked for a phone number and I panicked, had a drop down menu that also allowed email address…Phew.

    Note this is a random thing with hotmail they wrote, and it could happen to you next so be prepared with another email address for which you can forget the password to :))

    I spent half a day messing around with all this stuff designed to protect me :finger:

  • #196161

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    About the Hotmail asking for verification phone number question I had above. What I have learned is that you CANNOT bypass this and get to your mailbox and worse is that many people who travel a lot are having the same issues with being locked out each time they change situation. Complaints all over the net on this one.

    So…in case it happens to you, you need at least to have another email address…preferably not a hotmail one as the same could happen there too. I made a Yahoo one with a convoluted (forced to) password I will never remember, and Hotmail sent a code to that. Where they asked for a phone number and I panicked, had a drop down menu that also allowed email address…Phew.

    Note this is a random thing with hotmail they wrote, and it could happen to you next so be prepared with another email address for which you can forget the password to :))

    I spent half a day messing around with all this stuff designed to protect me :finger:

    I mainly use a yahoo account.
    I travel a lot (probably even more than you do) and so far I’ve never had any problems.
    Occasionally I get an e-mail that someone has logged in from an unknown location and telling me to ignore the warning if it was me logging in and take action if it must have been someone else (which it never has been so far).

  • #196159

    GlennB
    Participant
    Neophyte

    @kiwi wrote:

    About the Hotmail asking for verification phone number question I had above. What I have learned is that you CANNOT bypass this and get to your mailbox and worse is that many people who travel a lot are having the same issues with being locked out each time they change situation. Complaints all over the net on this one.

    So…in case it happens to you, you need at least to have another email address…preferably not a hotmail one as the same could happen there too. I made a Yahoo one with a convoluted (forced to) password I will never remember, and Hotmail sent a code to that. Where they asked for a phone number and I panicked, had a drop down menu that also allowed email address…Phew.

    Note this is a random thing with hotmail they wrote, and it could happen to you next so be prepared with another email address for which you can forget the password to :))

    I spent half a day messing around with all this stuff designed to protect me :finger:

    Yeah, I had to go through all that nonsense a few weeks back. Total pain in the arse. MrsB also uses Outlook (hotmail) but didn’t get the verification request business so maybe she has that pleasure in store.

    In my case I made the mistake of giving them a landline number to receive the code but they were clever enough to deliver the code in 1000mph Greek, so we couldn’t make it out. I switched to email notification and actually copy/pasted the code and it was WRONG, not even the correct length.

    Multiple tries later I got a legitimate code and was working again :roll:

  • #196165

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    IRRITATING Glen. I think I might have put in a wrong password a couple of times until I remembered I had changed it, and that probably lit their fire. Am getting so confused with all the pins and passwords and changes. Can’t remember anything.

    I hear you ian about yahoo and I do have that as my third option at the moment, mainly because my Hotmail one is connected to my ipad and iphone and all the other Apple shennanigans and honestly I am dead scared to change the Apple stuff over in case I botch up and get locked out of everything. When my kids bought it for me, they literally stood over me demanding I give emails, passwords and my bra size so they could connect me to the Apple world. At the time I was the reluctant recipient begging them to give me time to think it all through and what email I wanted to use etc. Now feel stuck with it. I still can’t figure how my devices somehow talk to each other and mostly it irritates me that those devices are in control and I sit there helplessly glaring at them when they all beep and whine at once, and the best part…I can’t send email from them, only messages.

    Anyone else feel their entire life is technified, passworded, connected and totally convoluted. When I think off how simple life used to be without all the tech stuff. You weren’t at home or the office…no one could reach you. Bliss. You gleefully checked your letterbox for mail ever day, and rubbish was obvious and mail was too.

    Every time you want to find something out you need to join that forum and go through all the crap only to find that you can’t post your question anyway (hence the reason I use you lot so much.) I find more of my day is wasted with such things now, like the Hotmail six hour 3 day saga. For what?

    Am going to stuff those silly pods in my ears and listen to a podcast now…my mood is filthy and pray tell me who can keep those stupid silicone plugs in their ears anyhow. They drop out and I am thumping away at my device trying to figure why the sound has gone.

  • #196162

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    When I installed Hotmail I had to give an answer to a question nobody would know the answer. Like the birthplace of mother or the name of first cat/dog. When I would forget my password, Hotmail could check it is me.

    During my visit to Greece recently I had to get a number which was sent to my other Hotmail address. Ofcourse I could not get into the other Hotmail address, because the number was sent to the other Hotmail address.

    People who change these systems around, do they travel themselves? How do they check their mail?
    Ah, probably people who work at Hotmail, don’t have a Hotmail account.

  • #196160

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Just cleaning out my messages and was reminded that ‘stabbitandsteer’ has not posted for a long time…come back stabbit. Where are you nowadays.

  • #196176

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Yahoo. Is anyone else unable to sign into yahoo. I have tried on both internet explorer and firefox. I put in name and password and when I click the sign in button nothing happens. Zilch.

  • #196177

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    Yahoo. Is anyone else unable to sign into yahoo. I have tried on both internet explorer and firefox. I put in name and password and when I click the sign in button nothing happens. Zilch.

    Just tried; no problems… 😕

  • #196148

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Working here too now. Was a glitch everywhere I read.

    Meanwhile time to get nervous about air traffic control in Europe? http://news.yahoo.com/flights-briefly-vanish-austrian-air-162845447.html;_ylt=AwrBEiJX3ZlTCU0AnFHQtDMD

  • #196129

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    …and it’s Friday the 13th with a full moon. No wonder my day has been memorably the PITS! :(

  • #196233

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I hate opening up GIH and seeing no posts. Come on, there must be something to share. Weather for instance. Is it not weird to have rain in a Greek summer? You used to be able to guarantee dry weather from May onwards.

    Ok back to my soppy movie with Michael Douglas and Annette Benning. The President and Mrs Wade.

  • #196234

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    Well, this is getting to what I understand is “facebook” level, sharing details that nobody is interested in just for the sake of saying something, but…

    I’m in the Netherlands right now.
    Had to do refreshers on my “safety at sea” and “firefighting” tickets last week and “Helicopter Underwater Escape Training” after the weekend (that’s the most fun part, they strap you in a mock-up helicopter, stick you in the water, turn the whole thing upside down and then it’s up to you to knock a window out, get rid of your safety belts and make your way through the window to the surface 😀 )

    Used my Saturday off to visit the children and was instantly made to babysit my twoandahalfyearoldgrandson.

    Today traveling to the south of the country (does a country as small as the netherlands actually have a “north”, a “south”, an “east” and a “west”? 😕 ) to visit a friend who’s recently been diagnosed with incurable cancer.

    Still unclear whether I’ll be flying back to Athens or onwards to Aberdeen on Tuesday (holding tickets for both) due to uncertainty of vessel availability for the little job I’m supposed to go do… :roll:

    And, on the weather, yes, it’s funny but then again May 2012 was vèry wet and I also have recollection of some serious deluges in July and August at times…
    Once you think something is a given it’s bound to prove you wrong…

  • #196235

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Quite so Ian. I have started to feel as if GIH has become my personal blog since hardly anyone posts any more and I hate the thought that this so useful source of Greece assistance will die or get closed down through
    lack of interest, and so rather than see weeks worth of empty, I post in the vain hope that at least some of the old regulars will continue. I don’t, won’t do Facebook since it has no semblance of privacy.

    Some days it’s just you and me in here Ian. Meanwhile I can see the numbers that read the posts and wonder why they won’t join in. Shy? Such a shame. Then I think…hmmm maybe it’s the entire NSA trawling GIH as they do Facebook. Hahaha…I am sure reading sundodges sausage recipe will assist in national security 😆 😆

    Fascinating insight into your days. I get claustrophobic thinking of you being tied and dunked into the deep. You must be very brave and I can’t help thinking of you as Arnold Schwartzenegger In some action movie in my minds eye. What an exciting and useful life you lead and a grand daddy too :)) Lucky wee chap to have such a role model.

    My days have also been around the very, very sick, it is emotionally draining.

    Weather…having lived in NZ where you can’t plan a BBQ because even if you phone friends to come an hour ahead while the sun is glaring and the day is calm, you can bet that within minutes a howling gale force southerly will drive everyone inside to bake :angry: the lamb chops in the oven. NZ is what I use as a comparison to Greek weather.

    Be safe.

  • #196230

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    I am one of the ‘readers’ and can assure you I am not with the NSA or whatsoever :))

    Must admit I don’t post that much, because I just don’t live in Greece and therefore am not aware of life there …………………. come on just buy my house in NL and then I will be able to post more on GIH :mrgreen:

  • #196231

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Ha..you got stuff for sale too. It’s a bummer when you sit on assets and can’t get rid of them to do what you want. Maybe it’s an omen from above…booming voice saying ‘don’t sell’ because he knows the banks are going to close on all our money via a ‘Bail In’

    Anyway there is no reason not to post alien, just because you don’t live in Greece! most of us don’t all the time anyway. Take kolly for example………who has been deafeningly absent lately.

  • #196232

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Just to prove it…

    Well had a relative staying so not much posting time……..

    Then arranging a last minute hol…….

    Then Dog sitting………

    need I go on?

    Must go, clothes to wash, try to get them dry before we go, back soon….and past my bedtime!

    (p.s. for national security reasons can’t tell you when I go (but you can guess how long it takes to dry clothes in Skotia 😉 ) , where I’m going, or when I’ll be back)

    I take it you escaped Ian? 😆

  • #196229

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    You wash and dry clothes kolly ic_shock
    You babysit the dog.
    You arrange trips.
    …and I bet you are polite to Mrs kollys relatives and make Haggis too.

    Take very careful note Mr Kiwi!

    Signs of life please ian…i see there are 5,510 reads of this thread…I am sure a great percentage of them are anxiously checking back to see if you made it out of the helicopter. My friend you need your own ‘special forces’ thread, to entertain the masses.

    Answer me this…a boring thread with nothing in particular in it (apart from ian being thrown in to drown), is read 5,510 times. WHO are these people? Front up and join in, we love a crowd. In fact posts are so thin on the ground we are happy with any comments whatsoever. How about a comment on where you think Greece will be in six months.

  • #196268

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    Well, I survived… 😀

    Which means I’m good again to go offshore for another four years (providing I keep passing the annual medicals). :nod:

    There’s preciously little “young blood” in this line of work, my clients are slowly starting to worry about what to do once the current generation retires. 😐

  • #196300

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Don’t worry ian, it will all be done by robots soon…people are becoming a dying breed.

    Actually it is a pity that times are a changin so fast. In the old days, young ones were apprenticed off and some old codger like yourself 😆 taught them all they knew. Apprenticeship was a rite of passage for the young ones.

  • #196299

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    @Ian wrote:

    I’m in the Netherlands right now.

    Wish our Dutch holiday home neighbours were as well !! They sit outside on their covered terrace and talk from 0930 ’til 0100. This terrace is about 15 metres from our house and acts like an echo chamber come amplifier. :(

    What do they find to talk about for three weeks solid? 😕 Why do they never leave their terrace and go somewhere ?

    And don’t mention their cuckoo clock. :angry:

    8)

  • #196246

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    :)) :)) just picturing the cuckoo clock. Maybe it’s calling for a mate. Get your own one and set it five minutes late.

  • #196291

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    Are you sure they are Dutch?
    A cuckoo clock is German 😕

    What do they talk about for 3 weeks???? Is that maybe the reason it is so quiet on this forum. Maybe you should invite them onto GIH 😆

  • #196292

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    If you think it’s quiet now alien wait till next month. Hot and hotter will be the weather, and my avid posting will be on holiday, chasing around an increasingly stubborn little three year old. I already feel nervous. At least I will have the beach to bribe her with. Still haven’t booked anything……………. :roll:

  • #196270

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    Talking about HOT ! We are having a lot of stone paving & patios in stone laid at the moment. The three guys doing the work, under the charge of an Albanian stone mason friend are real stars, they are working from 8.00 am until 4.00 pm in a sun trap & a temperature of 40c plus. Even in the engine room of a steam driven Destroyer, I have never, seen anyone look so hot & have total respect for these chaps…They are almost worth the beer & food that it’s costing me ! :mrgreen:

  • #196271

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Poor sods. Hope they can hose down to cool off. You have to admire the stamina of hard working people who must work under such conditions to survive. I bet it’s not their choice.

    We look forward to photos of the finished job. reb_bravo

  • #196293

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Just discovered that when you fly with British Airways, you are allowed up to ten bags, you pay of course. Does anyone know if other airlines have a similar deal, and if it’s only for within Europe. Might come in useful when on a trip back down under. Meanwhile am at my 23kg limit and praying they don’t weigh hand baggage which is barely liftable.

  • #196294

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    How do you weigh your suitcase, kiwi? I only have a little bathroom scale and don’t get an accurate reading putting a large suitcase on it. Last year, at the last minute, my daughter added some of her stuff to mine and we ended up having to take it out again and rearranging things when we got to the check in window. It wasn’t a matter of just paying for the extra weight…they said it was too heavy for the baggage handlers to toss around. This year I’m traveling alone and terrified of being over-weight!

  • #196295

    altohb
    Participant
    Hoplite

    We bought a digital luggage scale a while ago – absolutely invaluable when you fly (like us) on budget airlines with very strict weight limits. The scales are available in all kinds of places – here for instance:

    http://www.ebay.com/sch/Luggage-Scales-/164798/i.html

    The analogue kind of scales are better than nothing – I’ve worked out that they normally weigh about a kilo light – ie if it reads 19kg then your case is probably 20kg, but the digital type are much better.

  • #196296

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I also us digital bathroom scales but don’t trust anything. I have one of those analogue weighers too but not a digital one. I am planning to buy a digital though as I found my analogue too inaccurate, though it did weigh light as alto said. Better than weighing over. Fact is, every thing I use gives a different weight. Go figure. This time am meant to have 23 kg exactly…will report back.
    My cabin luggage is ten they allow a very large hand bag which they don’t stipulate weight, so plan to cram as much a s I can in that, I am also carrying a large plastic bag which I will put my handbag into if they fuss too much and load that up to the max. Look on BA website, very generous allowances. Worth traveling with them just for that. Also I use the skyscanner app, brilliant. It gives you a month view of prices so you can choose the cheapest day. For a matter of a few days the difference in price was £55 or £320 incredible. Learning not to fly weekends. Another thing I find is choosing the last flight of the day, you don’t get so hassled as they all want to get home. Same applies at customs.

  • #196297

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    Would you believe that after so many trips to Greece, I had never heard of a luggage scale. You can bet I’ll be checking them out. My weight allowance is also 23 kg. for checked baggage, and 10kg. for each of two pieces carried on. I did my booking a couple of months ago before prices went up for summer…but more important to me than which airline or what price is the fact that I need direct from Toronto to Athens. I refuse to change planes in Amsterdam, or Frankfurt, or wherever. Hubby and I flew direct on Olympic for years and years, until they stopped their flights to North America. Luckily, Air Canada has a direct flight. The only other one I’ve found is Air Transat and they only fly a couple of times a week. So, thanks for the info. It’s very helpful.

  • #196298

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Am waiting to board, and happy to say they let it all through, bag was spot on 23kg and they didn’t weigh the cabin bag which was about 12. The luggage scales are on sale everywhere, just go to any travel department or even bag shops have them. Definitely go for digital. When I weighed my bag on bathroom scales had to hold it upside down or the wheels would stand a little on the floor, but just shows it was pretty accurate. When I have time I will check my skyscanner to see what flights go from Toronto on it and let you know. I never book way ahead anymore, found that it’s no cheaper and often last minute you can find great deals. I booked this one a week ago. Off to board now…

  • #196349

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    The guys finished the work in a week – A good job done & saved me from having to do it :))

  • #196350

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Blimey sunnyboy, it looks solid enough to be bomb shelter! All it needs are the side and front bits added!
    You’re taking ISIS threatened takeover of Greece a bit seriously it seems! :mrgreen:

  • #196358

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    Quite some metres and all in one week! Bravo, good job. You must have been feeding them sausages.

    Karysto petra?

  • #196359

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    I had already built the bomb shelter myself, so they didn’t have to do that – Some more pics attatched for the reast of the work… Don’t know the type of stone Alien, just that it was from Korifasio.

  • #196360

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Incredible work sundodge, you must feel really proud. I feel so envious. Our plans received a slap when the local authority decided one of our NZ property party walls need earthquake strengthening which will cost zillions, and worse, they are up for sale now and who will buy.
    It’s shelved our buying in Greece scheme so I am ultra jealous seeing your lovely dream house. Brilliant job and nice stone.

  • #196361

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    Karitou is greenish grey (well, most of it). This stuff comes by the name Alvanou.

  • #196362

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    I’m afraid that I’m a bit of a stone virgin :)) To me stone is stone, although this does have green in it, plus grey, yellow & red. As it was Alvanoi who laid it – perhaps it was the stone you say Ian ?

  • #196363

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    Not sure, on my screen the “base-colour” looks like a yellowish sand-colour in wich case: yes, that’s what it is (at least that’s what they call the stuff round here).

    Karistou is not as dark as slate but it’s overall “base-colour” is much more grey than that of the alvanou.

    Also karistou is ‘harder’ to the touch, a bit granite like, while the alvanou has a bit of a “softer” grainy feel (almost as if you could actually scratch some sandy dust off just using your fingernails.

    This is karistou:

  • #196364

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    I see what you mean Ian – That stone is lovely & I think well suited to an inside room as per your photo. I have actually seen this stone, but no ours is not that & I think for our purpose it would have been too dark for the area involved…And probably too expensive ! :))

  • #196357

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    I’m sure I recognised at least one bit of stone. Was it not tortoiseshell? reb_popo

    and as for the more sloping and near vertical bits, what was the batter? Did it have beer in it? :))

  • #196170

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Well. I managed to book from Blighty…going to Nydris in lefkada. Looks beautiful and the cost of the tickets were a grand less booking a package than doing airfares alone. It really is the way to go. We just won’t take the return trip back. Was in a bit of sweat wondering if I would find something last minute. Maybe will see some GOM floating about the area.

  • #196171

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    @kiwi wrote:

    Maybe will see some GOM floating about the area.

    In a previous time you would have been in Nimbus’ back yard.

    Went there 15 years ago on a boat from Ithika, the skipper was the spitting image of Tom Conti in Shirley Valentine, right down to the vest. We swam off Skorpios island and what I remember about Nydri was one long street specialising in gold shops. But then, what does one remember on a fleeting visit ?

    Enjoy your break.

    8)

  • #196168

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Wow, so it was nimbus’ patch. Sad he had to go.
    My question is does anyone know how one gets to Athens from lefkada or thereabouts, by bus or train or boat maybe? Any ideas welcome and hints welcome.

  • #196169

    The Grocer
    Participant
    Oracle

    Kiwi,

    Used to be a Ktel coach, cost about 45 Euro return, leaving eft Athens at about 7am
    good comfortable coaches (I am told)

    see http://www.ktelbus.gr/

    TZEVELEKI & PHILOSOFON
    31100, LEFKADA
    Τel: 26450 26086
    Fax: 26450 21827
    Τel. in Athens: 210 5150108
    email= info@ktel-lefkadas.gr

  • #196166

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Was it not tortoiseshell?

    I bet you think I’m off my head posing questions like that and you’re probably correct!

    But as way of explanation (for the comment not my madness!) is that Sunnyboy has lots of little hard round topped lumps in his garden that might be mistaken for mobile stone 😕 :)

  • #196167

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    My gardener told me that he has tortoises in his garden and never sees a snake !! Is this fact or fiction.

    8) 8)

    ps :- only 3 to go ( to 500 ), so keep the feeds coming. I want to be a Magus !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :nod:

  • #196163

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    Dunno about snakes, but if you have tortoises in your garden, you will never see any vegetables !

  • #196164

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    …Beware the ravaging hoardes ! :))

  • #196152

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    My gardener told me that he has tortoises in his garden and never sees a snake !! Is this fact or fiction.

    True Reiver, he did tell you that; well I think you told the truth….!!

    …and Sunnyboy reb_popo those three colourful blocks have not been laid straight and level. You were done!

  • #196153

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @the reiver wrote:

    My gardener told me that he has tortoises in his garden and never sees a snake !! Is this fact or fiction.

    It may very well be true that he never sees a snake. :nod:

    Whether that’s got anything to do with having tortoises in the garden is, however, not proven by the observation. :(

  • #196154

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    @sundodger wrote:

    .Beware the ravaging hoardes !

    Come on ! You have built a little ramp to help them. Anyway, we are jealous because we love tortoises and there are a couple in the field in front who, when the time is right, keep us awake with their bonking. 😆

    8)

  • #196149

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Toroises are very cute. There are a lot outside a museum in Thess near where i lived.

    Grocer many thanks for the bus info. Daughter has decided to join us in the last days, so now she talks of flying from Preveza…not sure if that is a go or not. I prefer the bus, same time once you consider the security crap we go through and getting there two hours early. As always when the offspring get involved, everything becomes complicated.

    So reiver…do you automatically become a magus, or does someone need to put a firework under SJS’ jumper.

  • #196150

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    @kiwi wrote:

    .do you automatically become a magus

    I am assuming that as this is such an efficient site, so well moderated and administered, that my elevation to the pantheon of posters will be automatic. :roll:

    8)

    Anyway we will know shortly as my next post goes in.

  • #196151

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    Just as an aside, we were out last night at a taverna and got talking to a couple at the next table. Mrs R asked if they read our local camboard and they said yes. Then they reeled off three names, and I came second. ic_confused

    Behind “the donkey”, (KP), but in front of Sundodger in his local guise. Oh, the notoriety ! :nod:

    8)

  • #196143

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    @the reiver wrote:

    such an efficient site

    And it is !!!!

    8)

  • #196117

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Congratulations reiver. Now you can push to become an oracle 😀 …start posting thrice daily.

  • #196118

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I have another burning question since I arrive in Greece on Sunday, sporting an iPhone that uses a mini sim, my Q card sim is the large variety, and can’t be cut to size. Any ideas what one does and if I will be able to keep my old number which I have had for years.

    Why on earth do they change these things…what was wrong with the plain old sim that they had to cut off a few millimeters. :finger:

  • #196119

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    Why on earth do they change these things…what was wrong with the plain old sim that they had to cut off a few millimeters. :finger:

    Ask the Apple company. For some reason they seem to be hell-bent to make sure non of their stuff is ever compatible with anything else… :roll:

  • #196140

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I agree Ian. I would never have chosen apple products, personally I hate their logic and prefer PC, but the kids forced it on me. Example of the stupidity. Yesterday I wrote a document I wanted to send to my daughter. I got into my gmail and tried to attach the doc from apple Pages app. There was no way I could do it, I was only able to attach photos. It gave me two options for attaching…photos or scribbling, not docs.

  • #196131

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Yesterday was a bit of rain, today was thunder and lightning in Lefkada. What can I say, trying to amuse bub. The place is lovely only thing was that the photos of the beach must have been retouched and it’s not even clean sand or pebbles it’s more like cement aggregate that has been poured on the beach to cover stones…who knows. No wonder Onassis shipped in sand. Personally I like sand. Just lost my cursor…how can it just vanish on an ipad.

  • #196156

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Kiwi curses the cursor………. 😉

  • #196174

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    More rain…I hear Thess has flooded badly. All this weather makes the water cold. Not even a swim yet. Bub going nuts with not much to do except stick granny’s hair into pigtails…six of them. I look like a demonised melon. Now do I wish I brought more toys. Argh.

  • #196155

    GlennB
    Participant
    Neophyte

    We had a sprinkle of rain down here in Arkadia, but precious little. Can we have some of yours?

  • #196301

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    @the reiver wrote:

    Just as an aside, we were out last night at a taverna and got talking to a couple at the next table. Mrs R asked if they read our local camboard and they said yes. Then they reeled off three names, and I came second. ic_confused

    Behind “the donkey”, (KP), but in front of Sundodger in his local guise. Oh, the notoriety ! :nod:

    8)

    Did you say you are ‘reiver’????
    I mostly deny I chat on forums 😛

  • #196302

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Everyone around the pelops will recognise Reiver as he charges along on his old borders nag riding round the boundaries……..very common is his riding ability 😀 :nod: !

    Your secret is safe with us, Alien 😆
    ……….well for a very small preposterous exorbitant fee :))

    ……..but everyone will know you when you hit the headlines for cornering the market in Greek Balsamico. I bet you buy up all available stocks and then sell them at inflated prices on Ebay!

    I suggest anyone with a few ‘drachmas’ to invest puts it into Meteora Balsamic futures ic_wink

  • #196188

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Very quiet on here. I am in Ios, very quiet here too. All the tourists have left, just a few stragglers around. Rather boring.
    Will be back in Athens in a few days. I hate those ferries where you can’t go on deck. Make you feel like a rat in a cage. Heaven help if there was an accident. All I could picture was hundreds of people wearing life jackets and scrambling for the tiny door.
    Benda are you still n Greece? I now recognize what you were saying about airline prices from Canada. I was checking them out a few weeks ago and they are atrociously expensive compared to other places and nothing direct, at least to Edmonton.

    C’mon all…how about some updates.

  • #196189

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    Yes Kiwi, quiet in Kalamata too.
    It always surprises me, as soon as September arrives the beaches are deserted, regardless of the weather.
    On the beach today, 33 degrees, lovely sunshine, warm sea and only me and the dog enjoying it !!
    Not that I want to share, but it seems a waste.
    Yet in town all the kafeneions are full of people with jeans and jackets on ?!
    It’s like there’s some unwritten rule – no locals on the beach or in shorts after 31st August.

  • #196190

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    I came home on Aug. 31, Kiwi, and it was the most wonderful visit ever. The first time being there alone, and as much as I love daughter and the kids, it was so, so relaxing without them! And a great time with the family over there. But, coming home, the jet-lag was the worst I’ve ever experienced and it took a full week to begin getting back to normal. All part of getting older, I guess ic_smile . As for the airline, I probably already mentioned that for the last two trips I’ve used Air Canada’s new Rouge…a truly no-frills airline! I would happily pay more for one of the other flights if only they were non-stop. Only Rouge is direct from Toronto to Athens, and back. The best purchase I’ve made in a long time (aside from the iPad) was the luggage scale…thank you for the advice on that!

  • #196191

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    I thought they were joking the first time I heard “oh no, it is past 1st September, we cannot go swimming anymore” …………. indeed some families (also young families) do not go into the sea after 1st of September. Must admit there are also quite a few who do go in the sea when it is still warm in September.

    Where do they get the date from that they cannot swim anymore and winter has started?

  • #196192

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    The timetable for the ferry stops at 14 September ……………..
    Lucky I know it goes winter and summer, in winter not so often though. Yes the winter that starts on September 14th 😆

  • #196193

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    And…they pack up the ice cream fridges in September too. Actually the cut off is more like 15 th August. I am surprised that they still have aircon turned on in the busses in Athens. Usually they are off 1st Sept. We are cooking here in IOS, as hot as full on summer. Only tourist stragglers on the beach.
    Am going Down Under in November. Dreading it. Two weeks of jet lag. I thought that going north would not affect you as much since it is also in the same hemisphere as Greece. I always recovered fast going North but going back South to a different hemisphere was murder. I wanted to visit family in Edmonton but not sure I can take a trip so far North and then back to the bottom of the world in one go.

    My burning question is, will kolly be back in Scotland in time to vote.

  • #196183

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Certainly not Kiwi. We (Mrs Kolly to her credit) had organised a postal vote as we would not be home in time. Heard the result from a hotel bedroom in Perea on BBC World Service whilst sheltering from the rain and intermittently throwing things back into the suitcase.

    Saloniki’s GreenWave Festival [ It is an alternative “green” celebration which is organized by the Ecological Group of Thessaloniki every year since 2011, in cooperation to other organizations and networks] -so it says on their web site – was getting set up near the museum. They were wasting lots of energy playing loud much amplified ‘musak’ – virtually an oxymoron then was the ‘Green’ title we thought. We did ask around about you, Kiwi, expecting, as you were not there, then they would all know you, but no one seemed to have heard of you or was not prepared to admit it! 😆

  • #196184

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Sorry kolly I was in Athens and surrounding islands. Haven’t been up to Thess yet. Pity about the weather up there. September is not as nice in the North. Tomorrow they expect 33 here in Athens so it’s off to the beach.
    So……are you happy with the vote result?

  • #196185

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    @kiwi wrote:

    So……are you happy with the vote result?

    Yes, thank you ! My saltire is proudly flying over my modest Peel House, but I was worried I might have had to lower it to half mast last Friday.

    As the saying goes — “you can take the man out of Scotland (nearly 40 years in my case), but you can’t take Scotland out of the man.” :))

    The sensible decision, and only 4 areas voted ‘yes’. This shows the imbalance of Scotland’s demographics with the majority of voters being in Strathclyde.

    8)

  • #196200

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    What really amazed me were the number of “Yes” voters for West Dumbarton, which is the general area for the Clyde submarine base at Faslane – Thousands of direct jobs would have been affected and many more indirect jobs encompassing the whole area, including Glasgow !

  • #196201

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Yep also content with the result but not with several other issues such as:

    The rosy picture painted by the Yes campaign which really failed to significantly answer any of the difficult questions thrown at it; The fact that independence was really put forward as supposed getting democracy and anti a certain political party (the Tories)- it should have been apolitical, party wise; and promised a supposed ‘fairer’ treatment of the ‘working classes'; and to supposedly make Scotland more attractive to incomers (at the same time the local housing market fell apart and referendum get out clauses were added to contracts!); and ignored the SNP centralisation policies currently adopted (one of the arguments against Westminster!). Plus the costs, to set up a new system in the short term and long term funding gaps – even the Yes ‘white paper’ which looked very much like an SNP manifesto was paid out of public funds:

    The rather pathetic No campaign which was at best lack lustre much along the lines of Alistair Darlings personality. Their failure really to show any great positives in remaining as part of the UK ;and the failure to adequately explain currency issues; and their often, so it seemed, changes in argument. Surprised me the Yes vote was not higher closer to the polls predictions!

    ……and from both sides, during the campaign, the rather odious rhetoric from some supporters; and after the referendum the aggressive comments by the disappointed, the lack of will to accept the democratic decision of nearly 90% of the residents and the clashes between the two sides in Glasgow upon release of the vote results. Shame on them all.

    I think Sunnyboys might have expected a bigger No vote but the remaining BAe Systems Shipyards and Faslane workers a) do not all live in the voting area b) the apparent proximity to the nuclear warheads played a apart c) the aforementioned workers form a small percentage of the population in the area and the a large proportion of the remainder were exactly the socialist ‘working classes’ the promised populist independence measures were aimed at. Many of the inhabitants there live in depressed areas (such as Clydebank right next to the shipyard) and do not form part of the highly skilled and well paid workforce.

    I use ‘working class’ here as the recognised group of (supposedly) lower paid or non working individuals rather than workers in general many of whom are not traditionally recognised as ‘working class’ despite the fact that they work and are not necessarily well paid!

    Given that this is GIH forum and that there will be common political traits within European countries and other wishing independence referenda that is all I propose to write on the subject :nod:

  • #196178

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Nuclear warheads? ic_shock

  • #196179

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    The UK nuclear deterrent, based on the trident missile system is at Faslane on the Gareloch…The missile wareheads are kept at a separate location at Coulport, a more remote location.

  • #196180

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    True Sunnyboy; but if one went off accidentally (yes a very very remote possibility!) or there was an accident in transportation or the area (either Faslane or Coulport) were the subject of a first or subsequent strike then I doubt if many of those voters would be unaffected! …a whole host of possibilities considered by the worriers in the (in nuclear term) near vicinity……………Mind you if that attack scenario came to pass few if any of us would be immune from the actions and resulting fallout!

    Sorry Kiwi did I miss spell? Should it have been the US ‘Nuke-ular’?

  • #196181

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    Is anybody else getting that ‘Doomsday’ feeling ?

  • #196182

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    …Only when I think too hard & that’s not very likely at all :))

  • #196286

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    We’re doomed….. doooooomed I tell ye! ic_shock
    The end of the world is nigh! Repent!

    Is that the sort of of Doomsday feeling you had in mind Shazzie? :roll:
    If so….. yes! 😯

  • #196287

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Ah! That sort of Doom…but Don’t panick Shazzie!

    …and there I was thinking of an old Anglo-Norman book…. 😳

  • #196288

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kolofarthos wrote:

    Ah! That sort of Doom…but Don’t panick Shazzie!

    …and there I was thinking of an old Anglo-Norman book…. 😳

    The sort that’s more like a ‘Boom’sday? 😐

  • #196262

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Some partially useless information. Was shown last night while not paying full attention, how to check if your remote control is working when you are not sure if it’s a battery failure. You push any button of the remote at the camera when it is on in your phone, and the light of the remote shines through so you know it’s working. ic_geek

  • #196263

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    It’ll be a shame for those who waste money buying a new remote control just because they have a camera that doesn’t respond to infra-red eh? :(

  • #196264

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    …And back to the “Doomsday feeling” Monday had to replace the immersion heater in the solar boiler on the roof, Tuesday had to get the “Poo tank” pumped out, wednesday replaced the innards of two toilets to stop the constant flow of water down the drain (really should have done it before) Thursday slipped off a ladder whilst working on the summer house roof – Luckily I didn’t break anything – I’m also ok :)) Friday (today) had a dog poisoned near the end of her walk – Dog is now ok, but I am very angry ! Shall now have a few beers & hope for a better week to come !

  • #196265

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    SHit shit week sundodge 😀 what else could go wrong? At least the weather is fine.

  • #196266

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Listen up kolly…I did mention I wasn’t paying much attention, and, was not enthused enough to examine the possible complications…I leave those difficult tasks to the men :)) I have much more important things to do….Frickin packing again!

  • #196267

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    Bloody Hell Sundodge – and I thought we’d had a bad couple of days.
    But the worst of ours was the electric bill twice as much as usual.

    So glad that your pooch recovered ok.
    Really really wish the Greeks would develop an ounce of common sense and humanity and stop this terrible practice.

    Our best wishes to you all.

  • #196261

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Sometimes, Sunnyboy, you have just got to take the rough with the smooth and put your feet up for a while!
    Glad to hear the hound is OK………….and of course your summer house too :))

    Think positive, it could have been falling off your balcony!

  • #196260

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    …Never thought of that – Must try harder :)) Anyway, today saw the purchase of approx 70 kilos of Pork for my next forray into the world of charcuterie & all thoughts have turned to bacon, gammon & ham for the time being – Should be safe enough…Apart from the very sharp knives of course :))

  • #196258

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Yum sunnyboy. I am craving a banger…one week to wait and then I can gorge myself.

  • #196259

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic
  • #196243

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    @sundodger wrote:

    Thursday slipped off a ladder whilst working on the summer house roof

    “At the charity bazaar in Stoupa on October 5th, the new Chicken spinach & feta sausages surpassed all expectations & just flew off the table…Well that’s chicken for you”

    Should have had some up the ladder with you ! :))

    8)

  • #196244

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    …Need more than chickens to flutter me safely to Earth :))

  • #196245

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Packed a couple of my older cases which have combination locks…the four digit kind. Ummmmm after so long, I don’t remember the code and dare not lock them in case I will have to break the case to get back In.
    Any ideas if these silly things can be reset and how?
    Off to Blighty on Saturday and then to the antipodes next month. Been avoiding it and dreading it!!! Not sure if I can survive thirty hours of flying, let alone being tucked well underneath the globe nearest neighbors being the Penguins. Why would my parents choose there to live?

    Now the big question is which airline do I choose with the least chance of spraying me with Ebola. Initially I was banking on Emirates or Etihad. The daughter suggested Malaysian Airlines. my immediate question was did she want to get rid of me forever. Oof…decisions decisions.

  • #196240

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    Emirates, business class, is to be recommended. Lounges at the airports (free food & booze) plus you can sleep all the way in a flat seat.

    8)

  • #196241

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @the reiver wrote:

    …plus you can sleep all the way in a flat seat…

    8)

    How’s that? Dope yourself into oblivion for thirty hours or something? 😕

    Personally I’d be happy if I managed 6 hours… :(

  • #196242

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Argh! Am just taking a break from trying to juggle the weight of my baggage. The scales weigh a different number each tIme and I am still three kg over.

    Any idea if aegean are strict and weigh your hand baggage? I took the heavy bits and loaded the hand luggage. They only allow 8kg and it weighs about 10, then…….I have my ladies handbag, which probably weighs another 3 kg. wondering if the ladies handbag is included in the total hand luggage allowance. This is so difficult! Bought the bub some olives and Greek goody things and really don’t want to have to dump it. Certainly not paying 40 perkg for it.

    Will look into Emirates again. Trying to find a route that has the shortest hours otherwise it can run to 40 with all the stops etc. also tempted to go via Thailand and stay a couple nights to break the trip.

    Kolly where’s the guff on the trip? Warm here in Thess now.

  • #196238

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Ah! …erm…..er…… coming up soon. Been a bit distracted by other practical matters such as how anyone can process 70Kg of meat!

    When do you fly out Kiwi? I’ll try and get more written to help you sleep on the journey! 😆

  • #196239

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Passed without getting hand baggage weighed..smiled lots and got the big bag through. Phew. Downloaded the ITV app and watching Downton Abbey catch up. All quiet and cloudy and damp.

  • #196237

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic
  • #196225

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    The site is dying…where is everyone. Meanwhile burning question. Why does anything with jam always fall on you jam side down.

  • #196226

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    @kiwi wrote:

    Why does anything with jam always fall on you jam side down.

    The Irish tried to get this into “the miracle” part of the church teachings, but after a Papal review they decided it was because YOU put the jam on the wrong side of the bread ❗ :))

    8)

    The board isn’t a Norwegian Parrot, it’s just resting. :nod:

  • #196227

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Hilarious reiver! 😆 😆 😆 Brilliant in fact. I shall make sure I turn the bread over next time. Now why couldn’t I have thought of that! reb_bravo reb_bravo So glad YOU weren’t resting.

    Now to serious stuff. I booked to Down Under. Thirty hours flying with two breaks of one and a half hours via Brisbane. Now if that doesn’t kill me nothing will. Decided to take a punt on cattle class with the intention of paying for an upgrade in the plane if I really can’t cope on the second leg. Daughter says it’s cheaper that way but you risk there not being any seats empty. I am punting on an empty plane. Leaving on the 25th.

    What I learnt….Expedia and Momondo are very pricey, skyscanner was tops, and Netflights.com and Travel Trolley very good. I used travel trolley as prices were lowest. I have no idea how it all works but was very surprised to find that every site had different prices for the same flight. Singapore air site was more than Traveltrolley.

    The Norwegian is busy Christmas shopping.

  • #196222

    GlennB
    Participant
    Neophyte

    @kiwi wrote:

    The site is dying…where is everyone. Meanwhile burning question. Why does anything with jam always fall on you jam side down.

    The boring answer: it’s actual physics! Those things tend to be of a similar size and get knocked off things of a similar height in a similar way. Like the buttered toast. It’s all geared up to allow a single flip before the gloopy side hits the deck [/geek mode]

    Mind you, our floors are never clean enough to pick it up, brush it off and eat it even if it landed dry side down

  • #196223

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Oh shit…. Travel trolley which I booked with appear to be a scam and am presently talking with my card provider.

  • #196224

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Glen…it didn’t hit the floor it hit my right shoulder…was lying In bed eating and drinking tea in a rather contortionist manner. Specifically I was wearing a pure merino wool moonlight coloured top. The jam colour was mixed berry. :roll:

    As for the site, Amex did sweet fanny all but my email must have ruffled the feathers of the travel site who. Wrote and said they would cancel the booking and void the payment. Mixed reviews about them, but what they do is they quote a price, mention in the fine print that it’s not the final price till they issue the ticket, and then after you have made the payment they call or write asking for more info regarding your card, a photo copy of back and front and a whole lot of stuff that seemed irrelevant to a normal sale. Got cold feet.
    Back to the drawing board now….searching for tickets.

  • #196208

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    Yes Kiwi, site IS quiet – mind you i’m as guilty as anyone for not being active.
    In my defence, we’ve been staying at a friends house in Poliani ( little village up in the mountains outside Kalamata ) with no internet.
    Looking after 4 dogs for 2 weeks and it rained for 10 days non-stop ! I swear it took us 2 days to feel dry and warm once we got home !!
    Nice welcome home – 3 bills to pay. 2 expected but the other was from Kalamata dimos, a water bill from 2010 & 2011. After some investigation we discovered that when the supply was switched from the Dimos to DEYAK, Kalamata forgot to send any bills for over a year ! Wonder if they’d notice if we forget to pay for 3 years ?
    Off for my 2nd Greek lesson tonight, trying to get past gia sou and tikanes ! 😕

  • #196209

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Ten days of rain! Hell. Almost as bad as Blighty shazzie. So are you getting private lessons or in a class? There are lots of things on the Internet to help learn.
    Meanwhile I am announcing an epidemic. Today, I kid you not, dropped two items that landed butter side down. Lucky this time on the floor rather than me. Obviously it has something to do with the alignment of the planets and Polar Reversal since no matter which side I butter on it keeps doing it.
    Kalinihta 😀

  • #196210

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Ten days of rain! Hell. Almost as bad as Blighty shazzie. So are you getting private lessons or in a class? There are lots of things on the Internet to help learn.
    Meanwhile I am announcing an epidemic. Today, I kid you not, dropped two items that landed butter side down. Lucky this time on the floor rather than me. Obviously it has something to do with the alignment of the planets and Polar Reversal since no matter which side I butter on it keeps doing it.
    Kalinihta 😀

  • #196211

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Ok there is a glitch somewhere…the above posted twice, I tried to edit and delete one…still there. Can’t be done.

  • #196212

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    There’s a youth volunteer club in Kalamata, where anyone up to 25 years old offers services for free.
    The centre is offering 4 months of ‘Greek for beginners’ for 10 euros !
    First time I went i thought it was 10 a lesson, but it’s for the whole course – amazing eh? reb_bravo
    Only an hour a week, but the tutor’s just finished her degree at Athens University, so she’s pretty smart.

    Thought it was high time i made some effort to learn the lingo.
    When we first moved, there were so many expats here who’d been here 10+ years and spoke pretty good Greek.
    If we needed help we could always call someone.
    But over the past 3 years nearly all of them have gone back home. So time to get started, albeit slowly !

    I’ve got a couple of ‘teach yourself’ DVD’s, but I think I’ll find them easier once i’ve got some basics in my befuddled head ! 😕

    I’ve always been hopeless at languages, totally flopped at school French , so fingers crossed I’m not too old for this learning malarky ! 😆

  • #196213

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    Good for you, Shazzie, for working on the language. I know I’m older than you, and I was well past middle aged when I started studying seriously. It takes a lot longer for things to sink in than it would for young people, but if you’re really motivated you can do it. Living there, and having the opportunity to use the language every day would be great. I only get a chance to actually use the language for the 3 or 4 weeks that I’m there every year. The internet has lots and lots of very valuable help.

  • #196214

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Leave Greek radio on to get a feel of the lilt. It does make it easier. One day you will suddenly realise that a lot of English words have a Greek root and you will find you know a lot more words than you thought you did. Bravo and keep us posted.

  • #196215

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Just booked my tickets. Stopover in Singapore airport for 11 hours staying in the terminal hotel before the next flight. Should be a breeze now. Only two more long flights after that. Price £730 not band for three days of misery. Leave on 1st and arrive on 3rd in afternoon. The flight plan shows it flys over Ukraine…..note to oneself to wear bullet proof vest :))

  • #196216

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    Crikey, recipe for jetlag or what ?!
    Ooh maybe I’ll know Greek for jetlag by the time you get back !

    Good idea re the radio.
    We go to the cinema here pretty regularly and I’m trying to read the Greek subtitles now for practice. 💡

    Thanks for the encouragement all. reb_bravo

  • #196217

    altohb
    Participant
    Hoplite

    @Shazzie wrote:

    Crikey, recipe for jetlag or what ?!
    Ooh maybe I’ll know Greek for jetlag by the time you get back !

    Good idea re the radio.
    We go to the cinema here pretty regularly and I’m trying to read the Greek subtitles now for practice. 💡

    Thanks for the encouragement all. reb_bravo

    I’ve found reading Greek subtitles on the TV really helpful – and it is interesting how often they don’t actually translate “properly” but use a Greek phrase with a similar meaning. I’m infuriated, though, by the fact that numbers are often transcribed incorrectly – that is just lazy!

  • #196218

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    So cinema subtitles eh? Very cheap way of learning. A years 10€ ticket Shazzie?

    Anyway to help you on the way here are some famous lines from films to help you along:

    Κατεβείτε από το άλογό σας και να πιείτε το γάλα σας.
    Ελάτε και δείτε μου κάποτε.
    Ειλικρινά, αγαπητή μου, δεν δίνω δεκάρα.
    Ατιμία, ατιμία. Έχουν όλα τα πήρε στο για μένα.

    [ you probably know my standard of Greek comes courtesy of Google translate and so, based on that on-line expertise, can now (once those word are understood – some hopes there! ) see my standard of films.

  • #196219

    altohb
    Participant
    Hoplite

    @kolofarthos wrote:

    So cinema subtitles eh? Very cheap way of learning. A years 10€ ticket Shazzie?

    Anyway to help you on the way here are some famous lines from films to help you along:

    Κατεβείτε από το άλογό σας και να πιείτε το γάλα σας.
    Ελάτε και δείτε μου κάποτε.
    Ειλικρινά, αγαπητή μου, δεν δίνω δεκάρα.
    Ατιμία, ατιμία. Έχουν όλα τα πήρε στο για μένα.

    [ you probably know my standard of Greek comes courtesy of Google translate and so, based on that on-line expertise, can now (once those word are understood – some hopes there! ) see my standard of films.

    Those films are all of the same vintage as those that I like! The Greek is a bit iffy, to say the least, I’d imagine, but it made some sense which is, after all, what matters!

  • #196207

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    We’re VERY good girls who don’t smoke or drink so the cinema is our little treat ! 😉

    Because we go often the manager, Yiannis, gives us free popcorn and occassionally free tickets too !! reb_bravo

    Don’t ask for much, but I need my regular SCi-Fi fix or i’d go mad ❗ ❗

  • #196391

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic
  • #196392

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    Interesting read for all the UK. Expats.
    http://www.expatfocus.com/c/aid=1779/columnists/toni-hargis/global-citizenry—ruined-by-red-tape/

    Ironically, other EU citizens with non-EU spouses are free to settle in the UK. Yes, that’s right; Brits have a tougher time bringing non-EUs into their own country than other EU citizens. Oh and Brits have to pay quite a lot of money but the visas for other EU folks? Free.

    What Mrs. Hargis fails to mention is that those “other EU citizens with non-EU spouses” have been jumping through very similar hoops in whatever EU country they lived when the first brought their non-EU spouses into the EU.
    (Although some countries are a tad easier that others, I hear Dutch citizens sometimes apply for a residence permit for their spouse (to be) in Belgium first because of that.)

  • #196393

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    See there is always a clever loophole. Brainstorming a problem always finds solutions.

    Note this is being written at 4.40 am. Back to insomnia. Lying here thinking about Monday’s flight and if I can do online check in for all three sectors in one go and choose seats. And Murphys Law…bub got the runny nose and sick for two days, and now granny has got sore throat and fever for the trip.

  • #196394

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Check in only allowed me on the first two sectors. Third sector from Brisbane is in limbo.

    My puzzle now is how to find out what terminal in Changi the plane lands as I booked a transit hotel in terminal 3 and sometimes they land in 2. There is no arrival terminal stated. Anyone know a site where one can find out?

    One very overflowing bag staring at me, while I pray it won’t weigh more than 30 kg. Fat chance. I will NOT remove the bottle of Tsipouro.

  • #196388

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Come now, Kiwi! Did you check the airport’s web site?
    http://www.changiairport.com/flight-info/flight-status/passenger-arrivals

  • #196389

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Course I did kolly, no terminal number, just says Changi. Anyway I looked at the map of the airport and find I can get from terminal 2 to 3 in transit so will just take a train over.
    Wish me luck…the flight crosses over Ukraine and Afganistan. Am packed and 1 kg overweight assuming my scales are ok. Feel nervous this time. Leave tomorrow and arrive Wednesday. My daughter is already making plans for us to have bub in Greece in July…hmmm I said exhaustedly. I am carrying her cold to the flight and will probably be stopped for having a fever, and then quarantined in case of Ebola.

  • #196390

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Funny that (no terminal info). On that page I posted it is quite clear: A heading for the terminal and a menu item for selecting terminal……

  • #196303

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Not for my particular flight kolly. Anyway……am in NZ now. I landed in terminal 2 and took the sky train over to T3 went straight up to the transit hotel, paid my hundred dollars and slept for nine hours. Felt fresh getting on the next long leg to Brisbane. Nice small airport with American style suspicion. Grrrr had to go through a body scan machine and they scanned me and my little carry on for a BOMB. Ridiculous since just got off a flight after being through Singapore security. OTT!!! This stuff makes me fume. Still better than the Sydney, Melbourne airports. Not many flights leave and the distance to the gates is short when you feel half dead.
    Anyway, wonderful to be home except that I feel,like an immigrant. I know nothing anymore. I need to join an expat site here to find out what to do! It’s been so long away. I miss Greece already, but…the fish and chips are to die for. Prices are crazy, I can’t believe it. Daughter showed me a small bottle of lemon flavored olive oil…$30. One leek cost $2.25 feels strange in the supermarket, I recognise nothing. Everything has changed so much. I take comfort in GIH..at least it’s familiar.

  • #196371

    rheia
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Thought it was time I checked on GIH and see that u r back in NZ. Welcome home and if u r up in Tauranga wld love to meet up. Now that I don’t spend a lot of time in Greece, it doesn’t seem quite the same coming on site as I did before. I don’t really have a lot to say. Merry Christmas all. Cheers

  • #196372

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Thanks rheia. Nice to see you online. Gih always feels so familiar and friendly, and even though I am down under GIH is always top in my thoughts as is Greece. In my minds eye, I see everyone here as my old friends.
    Stormy here today and I see that Athens is also going to get bad weather. I have the smart TV set to show Athens weather. Bet it snows…lucky sods. We just get wind with wind.

  • #196373

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Speaking of weather…….
    I don’t know if Ian is at home or at sea but he will hopefully, either way, be missing the 25m reported by the RNLI off Northern Scotland (they went out to rescue a Spanish fishing boat earlier today).

    It has been a good day to dry the washing (if you’re out of the rain) in the stiff breeze gusting to 80m.p.h. Makes a few showers in Northern Greece on our hols look a bit tame……

    …ooops…… that reminds me, next instalment still with the publishers. Note to me ‘must chase them up’

  • #196374

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    At home actually.

    I was in the Netherlands for an interview for a job last week and I will fly back there again for one day for an interview at the American embassy for a visa (the consulate in Athens didn’t even know what a B1-OCS visa is so the client figured I’d better go via the one in Amsterdam) on the 18th.

    Job’s not before (roughly) January 20th so I do get to spend some time at home.

  • #196375

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Good luck Ian. Everyone’s at home for Christmas.

  • #196376

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    We’re up in the mountains of Poliani from 19th December to Jan 4th. Looking after 3 doggies while their owners are home to Blighty.

    I’ve a feeling we’re in for a frosty time, it’s already minus 2 up there !!
    Won’t be posting over the holidays as we’ve no internet up there either.

    Back to basics Christmas for us then !!

  • #196377

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Have a nice one shazzie. Anyway, being away from Internet can be a blessing sometimes. It’s far too addictive.
    I am pretty happy as managed to renew my lapsed licence without having to sit tests again. Would have failed miserably. Even passed the eye test! Was chuffed.

  • #196378

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    I am pretty happy as managed to renew my lapsed licence without having to sit tests again. Would have failed miserably. Even passed the eye test!

    My word ! It’s a Christmas miracle !!!

    Happy Christmas Kiwi and all GIH ers wherever you may be .
    Hope we all have a good one and fingers crossed for a better 2015 !

  • #196379

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Thanks shazzie and same to you. Us kiwis can’t renew our licenses unless we are in the country and front up in person. I was here ten years ago just to do this. Licence $48, air fare $1700. Life used to be easy pre 911 everything was casual. Now we have to play by US rules and we are digitised, chipped, X-rayed and always suspected. Grrrr.

  • #196380

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic
  • #196381

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Well? Did you get the job Ian?

    Shocking story of that ferry on fire North of Kirkira. One dead at last report,hope that is all. Fire seems to be out but lots of smoke ( just as deadly) and 300 still on board…

  • #196382

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kolofarthos wrote:

    Well? Did you get the job Ian?

    Shocking story of that ferry on fire North of Kirkira. One dead at last report,hope that is all. Fire seems to be out but lots of smoke ( just as deadly) and 300 still on board…

    Yes, ten weeks of work (two five week stints) secured for 2015. 😀

    Shocking story indeed.
    They claim that the rescue is hampered by the rough sea but on all the footage the show the waves are no higher than two to two and a half metres high? 😕

    We train for these things at least once a month when I’m on board but there’s no telling what you will do when things become real (we’ve had some fires on board but nothing as spread out as this seems to have been) plus the crew would have had to deal with some 300 passengers with no training at all… 😐

  • #196383

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    I was also wondering about the high waves, couldn’t see it but the smoke was absolutely terrible.

    Once I spoke to a captain of a cruiseship who had also been captain on cargoships. He said “passengers are the most dangerous cargo”.

    Hopefully everybody will be rescued today.

  • #196384

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Sadly there will be lots of deaths, plus I reckon there are many illegals been let on. The story smells. Maybe the illegals were hiding in the cars on the car decks, maybe they smoked. Lots of maybes. For sure the most horrible thing is smoke. I burn something in the kitchen and can hardly stand it, never mind cars and trucks burning etc.

    And…we have elections. Happy New Year :

  • #196385

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Ha! You’re back kp. About time. You too dayglo. I miss the regulars. Happy New Year to you all. I hear it’s snowing in Athens. I feel jealous. Christmas holidays near the beach doesn’t feel quite the same as cold and snowy Santa weather.

    How worried is everyone about the coming elections?

  • #196386

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic
  • #196387

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    You may have missed this but a Cypriot cargo ship has had an accident in the Pentland Firth. See details with a web search.

  • #196409

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic
  • #196410

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I have travelled very intensively in the past ten years and have a large plastic bag of boarding passes to prove it. Looking for answers on why a perfectly healthy person can become ill, one has to wonder what effects all the flying has after seeing this article which has appeared many times over the last few days after a 60 minutes doco. http://www.veteranstoday.com/2015/02/26/the-airlines-toxic-little-secret/

  • #196411

    Sancho the Fat
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Yes, I’ve been hearing and reading about that for a long time. I’ve also been told that, unlike the air passengers have to breathe, the air in the pilots’ cabin isn’t recycled, and it’s for that reason.

  • #196412

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    I have travelled very intensively in the past ten years and have a large plastic bag of boarding passes to prove it. Looking for answers on why a perfectly healthy person can become ill, one has to wonder what effects all the flying has after seeing this article which has appeared many times over the last few days after a 60 minutes doco. http://www.veteranstoday.com/2015/02/26/the-airlines-toxic-little-secret/

    Shit!

    By all rights and reason I must have died years ago, flying all over the globe with at least twentyfive to thirty flights a year.
    Somewhere along the line I’ve become a zombie and I never noticed… 😯

  • #196413

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    Awful,awful pictures Kiwi, but unfortunately not isolated to Northern Greece.
    In our village here in the south of the Peloponese, poisoning is a regular threat.

    Our friends across Messinia have lost many of their pet dogs and cats, in addition to the poor strays.

    The cruelty is beyond belief.

  • #196414

    altohb
    Participant
    Hoplite

    @Shazzie wrote:

    Awful,awful pictures Kiwi, but unfortunately not isolated to Northern Greece.
    In our village here in the south of the Peloponese, poisoning is a regular threat.

    Our friends across Messinia have lost many of their pet dogs and cats, in addition to the poor strays.

    The cruelty is beyond belief.

    This is a problem all over Greece. Our welfare group (Animal Welfare in Sitia) lost 23 dogs the day after they were moved to a new shelter – someone chucked poison over the fence. It is a nightmare, and all animal lovers need to be constantly vigilant. The really sickening part about the poisonings of dogs at the shelter is that the welfare group was formed and is run by local people, not expats, as in many other areas.

    You can see more about the group on http://www.animalwelfareinsitia.org or on facebook pages “Animal Welfare in Sitia” or “ΦΙΛΟΖΩΙΚΟΣ ΣΥΛΛΟΓΟΣ ΣΗΤΕΙΑΣ”.

  • #196415

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    You just have to watch this video!

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-03-06/wierdest-thing-youll-see-today

    Fellas, watch out for the blonde Danes this summer :))

  • #196416

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic
  • #196417

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    Wow! I’d better make a list….or just sit on my hands…

  • #196418

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    And the Greek nod Brenda, and the raising the eyebrows for No, and don’t forget the tongue to teeth Ttsk also a No. :))

  • #196419

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    and also remember,Brenda, that sitting on your hands in a restaurant means that however good the service there will be no tip!….but you may go hungry :))

  • #196420

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    @kiwi wrote:

    And the Greek nod Brenda, and the raising the eyebrows for No, and don’t forget the tongue to teeth Ttsk also a No. :))

    Yes, kiwi, those were the first things I learned, many, many years ago ic_smile

    Kolo…okay…no sitting on hands. Somehow I didn’t think that would be a good thing to do. ic_smile

  • #196421

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Beautiful video of Meteora monasteries in Kalambaka.

    https://vimeo.com/87380900

  • #196422

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Daughter and bub have finally arrived….drumroll………………no luggage. All lost apart from what they are wearing and a kids trolley bag full of toys. I am reminded of kp and his loss. The culprits, Emirates changing to Qantas out of Sydney. What a day. I feel dead.

  • #196423

    The Grocer
    Participant
    Oracle

    @kiwi wrote:

    …no luggage. All lost apart from what they are wearing and a kids trolley bag full of toys..

    Sorry to hear that Kiwi, but this serves as a reminder to all….

    When travelling ALWAYS but your name and address (destination address) INSIDE the suitcase on a large sheet of paper, also (if possible write the home address in marker pen on the interior of the lid (not ways possible with some cases)

  • #196424

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    @kiwi wrote:

    Daughter and bub have finally arrived….drumroll………………no luggage. All lost apart from what they are wearing and a kids trolley bag full of toys. I am reminded of kp and his loss. ….

    Cheer up kiwi…. it all worked out well for us as we recieved quite a large amount of compensation AND they got our luggage back as well – after quite a time! :mrgreen: Look on the bright side of the situation! :roll:

  • #196425

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    @The Grocer wrote:

    When travelling ALWAYS but your name and address (destination address) INSIDE the suitcase on a large sheet of paper, also (if possible write the home address in marker pen on the interior of the lid (not ways possible with some cases)

    Excellent advice. I will do that!

    Sorry you and your family have to deal with that kind of crap, kiwi.

  • #196426

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    The bub is attached to my side at all times so that’s a compensation. I dolled her up as play dress up in granny’s cardigan with sleeves rolled up ten times and it’s down to the floor, since the other clothes were covered in chocolate from the plane. Duh daughter didn’t have the number for the insurance. Litany of mess ups.
    Bub woke at 4 am and came to our bed and chatted till 7am when she decided it was time for breakfast since she had refused dinner. Another month of this should just about finish us off 😆

    Us wise oldies have all the answers for traveling…ever tried to tell the know it all offspring? Unfortunately they have to suffer to learn. :roll:

  • #196427

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Bags found, and then lost again. No one knows where they are now. Argh! Airline are paying for some emergency clothes, but it’s the hassle of running around finding stuff to buy while jet lagged and worse…favourite sleep toy was put in the case for safe keeping.

  • #196428

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Not the toy lion gone again?…or was it a camel/cat/dog/tiger/elephant……my memory fails me….I think….. :(

    Can your daughter not remember the name of her insurer? Easy to find the telephone number then…

  • #196429

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Baggage sent to Auckland, we live in Wellington. Baggage now in Wellington. No one knows about it again. Litany of stupidity. Found insurers online. Airline in Australia offered cash payment for a few days of necessities. Try buying clothes for a cranky jet lagged four year old, whose latest ploy to get out of whatever it doesn’t like is the announcement ‘I need a poo.’ It works like a charm. Now did you really need to know all this? Meanwhile the weather is for rain, constantly.

  • #196430

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    Glad the bub arrived and not only the dirty washing :nod:

  • #196431

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    Crikey, Kiwi !

    Sounds like you’re going to need an extended holiday after the visits over !!

    Hope your weather picks up soon.

  • #196432

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Luggage here. Lots of pressies. Bub keeps asking to go to the beach because she sees the water. She thinks we are in Greece. Fat chance in a howling Southerly.

  • #196433

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    So glad the luggage has arrived, kiwi. That was much faster than I would have expected…although I’m sure it didn’t seem fast to all of you. ic_smile

  • #196434

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Since I am Down Under in NZ at the moment, I wish I could share how beautiful the night sky is in the Southern Hemisphere. The stars are so bright and many. I found this video which doesn’t do it justice but it’s a start. Milky Way
    http://twanight.org/newTWAN/photos.asp?ID=3003568

  • #196435

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    And this from the North Island mountain encapsulates it better. Where I live looking out on to the ocean means that side of the house is dark at night and so the stars are even prettier and brighter to watch.
    http://twanight.org/newTWAN/photos.asp?ID=3002797&Sort=Region

  • #196436

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    reb_popo pretty spectacular those, no wonder you stay up all night, Kiwi!

  • #196437

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    It is spectacular Kolly and a photo really does not do it justice. Even my four year old granddaughter was awed and commented. Of course she normally lives in England where they hardly ever see the sky :))

  • #196438

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Obviously summer has arrived and no time for GIH…unlike here where it’s winter and boring.

    Nothing worse than opening GIh and nothing to read. Here’s some fodder to chew on.http://en.enikos.gr/politics/

    Wonder what the Brits think of the election result. The Guardian showed how different the results would have been with another electoral system like proportional representation.

    How’s it going shazzie?

    Brenda are you going to Greece this summer?

  • #196439

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    Yup…my flight’s booked. Arriving in Athens on Aug. 8 and leaving Aug.30.

  • #196440

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    The Guardian showed how different the results would have been with another electoral system like proportional representation.

    Strange how two parties can get roughly the same number of votes and then one ends up with one seat and the other one with fifty-six seats in parliament… :roll:

  • #196441

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I agree Ian. You can bet the powers that were, reorganised the electoral system so that they would benefit.

  • #196442

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Help. I need ideas. We have a garage which is open to drive into. We don’t want doors. The problem lately is that the birds come in and sit in the rafters and plop all over the cars. mr kiwis roof has been damaged by the poo acid. Mine is the newer one and I don’t want it to suffer the same fate. Also I don’t want to have to keep washing it off. God how it sticks! Even hosing hard doesn’t remove it and it needs a brush.

    Please bombard me with bird repellant ideas. I don’t want to hurt them, just want them not to come inside anymore. This is a relatively new habit they have gotten into. I don’t want a cat because we can’t travel then.

  • #196443

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    Fishingline?
    The sort of nylon stuff and make sure that birds don’t have anywhere to sit/rest.

  • #196444

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    That’s a good one alien. They already have the rafters to sit on unfortunately.

  • #196445

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Netting?

  • #196446

    jodevizes
    Participant
    Oracle

    In the UK there are strips with little spikey things on them so the birds cannot roost. Youll probably find them on Amazon or Ebay. Or you could give them a supply of toilet paper :)

  • #196447

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    And there’s more……
    How about one of those plastic covers for the car? or Shazzie’s cat….. 😛

  • #196448

    The Grocer
    Participant
    Oracle

    The Morgan Sports car factory in Malvern has a “stuffed owl” in finishing area high in the rafters, I bought a plastic owl for my garage in UK and yes, the same effect!

    Most birds are afraid of owls as they are predators…..no birds in my garage!

  • #196449

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Netting sounds good but I fear they could get trapped on there and I would die to see one flapping while stick by broken feet caught in the net.

    I lie, the bird idea. I have never ever seen an owl here in NZ. Wonder where I could get something like that here. Any sort of biggish bird should scare them.

    Thought of the cover but can’t be biffed doing this very time I want to use the car, plus we have gale force winds that would likely blow it off.

    Thanks and keep em coming. reb_bravo

  • #196450

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    I was going to suggest a hawk or something, but the Grocer obviously gets up earlier than me ! :nod:

    How about some vertically hanging strips of plastic like they use in warehouses to enable the fork lift trucks ingress and egress. Not as rigid obviously as you don’t want to mark the cars.

    8)

  • #196451

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I like that one reiver. By the time I finish the place will look like a gypsys castle. The plastic strips would certainly blow around up here and scare them. Another job for mr kiwi. still wondering where to get a hawk or large bird. We have huge seagulls around here, I wonder if they would be scary to sparrows.
    Get a roadkill one :mrgreen:

  • #196452

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    With fishing line I meant you fasten it from one end to the other so the birds don’t have anywhere to sit i.e. rest anymore.

    The idea of a plastic bird is probably much better. Although when you don’t have owls around, maybe the birds don’t know they should be scared of an owl??

    Anyhow, these plastic birds are in all types of birds.

    http://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/Rotating-head-garden-owl-decoy-protects_1866518083.html

  • #196453

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    @Alien wrote:

    Anyhow, these plastic birds are in all types of birds.

    Only problem is the number you have to buy !! ic_shock

    8)

  • #196454

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I have my grandsons instead! They’re guaranteed to chase away any birds, squirrels, people, etc. :mrgreen:
    Nothing stands a chance of settling in my garden with those 2 around!

  • #196455

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    Don’t you have snakes either? I figure birds wouldn’t be overly keen on having a snake for a roommate?

  • #196456

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    ic_shock I don’t think I would like to get in the car anymore ic_shock

  • #196457

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    No snakes here Ian unless one escapes from a ship. Actually we don’t have predators in the bush. There are wild pigs and goats, but you need to go deep into the bush and mountains to ever see them. We have sharks, but I don’t think the sparrows would give a toss.

  • #196458

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I was so mad seeing my car covered in poop this morning that I had visions of one hundred sparrows roasting on a spit in the garage. I need to find a fake large bird. God knows what the neighbors will think of all the new decorating. I will be getting very strange looks. ic_geek

  • #196459

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    Maybe (untill you find your very big bird) a kite will help out for a while?

    The kite is light and will move in a little breeze???

  • #196460

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Please picture in your minds eye all these wonderful ideas hanging at the front of our garage. :)) some sort of little kite seems feasible. Did I mention that the winds up here are gale force most of the time and have ripped off the building paper that was under the garage roof. We get gusts that reach over 100km quite often.
    The two dollar shop sells angel wings made of feathers for kids. Now if I can just figure how to make a birds body to attach the wings to.
    The idea came from Wellington Airport. director Peter Jacksons of Lord of the Rings fame, and Middle Earth company Weka studios designed it.
    https://www.wellingtonairport.co.nz/about/middle-of-middle-earth-airport/
    [/url]

    And check out this video which shows what a feat it was actually putting it up. I plan to have Mr kiwi study it to get himself ready for my building of a miniature model. http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/9463779/The-eagles-have-landed-in-Wellington

    Seriously though, walking through our airport with all the flying beasts parked everywhere is amazing.
    The question now remains do I want poo damage on the cars or dents from falling fake birds :))

  • #196461

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Apart from the water going down the plug hole in the opposite direction down here in the antipodes. I just realized that we see the moon differently in North and South hemispheres. When you see a C, we see a D
    http://resources.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/time/moon/hemispheres.html
    Hmph, even children are smarter than me.

  • #196462

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    When you see a C, we see a D.

    No comment…

    :mrgreen:

  • #196463

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Where are you Ian? On land or sea.

  • #196464

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    Where are you Ian? On land or sea.

    Still home. :roll:

    They keep pushing the mobilisation date back because, due to eddie currents, the pre-work cannot be completed. :(

    I don’t mind having four months off but since you’re constantly thinking you may be asked to fly the next week you cannot realy make any plans for the extended leave period. 😐

    (Plus, no income for months while you’re waiting… 👿 )

  • #196465

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    That’s a bit poor to have you on standby and not pay you. Murphy’s law it will be the day you plan a BBQ with friends and have bought a ton of meat, they will call for you.

    Weather is funny world wide now. Here our ferries stopped today because of swells over six meters. I was watching from the window, it was rather beautiful to see the height of the waves crashing on the island.

    Hey at least you can swim daily.

  • #196466

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    @Ian wrote:

    @kiwi wrote:
    Where are you Ian? On land or sea.

    Still home. :roll:

    They keep pushing the mobilisation date back because, due to eddie currents,…

    If this Eddie Currents is that inefficient, why don’t they sack him? :roll:

  • #196467

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @KP wrote:

    If this Eddie Currents is that inefficient, why don’t they sack him? :roll:

    I would, but it’s not my call. 😐

    I think the boss’ wife is soft on him and I’m just a lowly free-lancer so what can I do? :

  • #196468

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Did I saw swells of six meters. Just heard they were nine meters, and I had to go past an area calle Lyall Bay which has huge waves and the water actually washed over the road including the car. It was quite scary. This is such a wild place!

  • #196469

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Just read this in the Independent re carry on baggage. Grr, I love my carry on which I have had for years and always squashed into those bag measure thingies at airports.

    The largest airline association in the world has announced plans to reduce the maximum size of airlines’ hand luggage.

    The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has announced it has recommended reducing the maximum size of carry on luggage.

    The IATA represents 260 major scheduled carriers, currently accounting for 83 per cent of air traffic.

    So far eight major airlines, including Emirates, Lufthansa and Qatar, have announced they will be implementing the new “best size” dimensions of of 55 x 35 x 20 cm. This is 21 per cent smaller than the average dimensions of major American airliners, American Airlines, Delta Air Lines and United Airlines, according to the Washington Post.

  • #196470

    jodevizes
    Participant
    Oracle

    So everybody will have to buy new luggage, great:{ It also says that each piece will have a unique bar code to help with luggage retrieval but it could be another method for your government to keep tabs on you. Paranoid, Moi ?

  • #196471

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-06-11/iceland-imprisoned-its-bankers-and-let-banks-go-bust-what-happened-next-3-charts

    Pity other countries don’t follow suit. The thieves in suits that strip countries should be given cake and then led to the guillotine.

  • #196472

    jodevizes
    Participant
    Oracle

    Amen to that.

  • #196473

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-06-11/iceland-imprisoned-its-bankers-and-let-banks-go-bust-what-happened-next-3-charts

    Pity other countries don’t follow suit. The thieves in suits that strip countries should be given cake and then led to the guillotine.

    Although the guillotine sounds appealing my favourite form of punishment would be for them to be released and the forced to live their lives with just the local minimum income. 😈

  • #196474

    Sancho the Fat
    Participant
    Neophyte

    http://mic.com/articles/80827/iceland-may-soon-see-a-2-unemployment-rate-here-s-how-they-re-doing-it

    As I remember, the government in London wanted to use anti-terror laws (!) to freeze Icelandic bank assets in London and use the money to compensate British local councils that had mis-invested millions with the Icelandic banks. Co-ordinated, vindictive lack of support by the west sent the krona into free fall. The PM of Iceland said that if no-one in the west would help they would ask Russia.

  • #196475

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Scrolling down on that mic website also a great story about an Australian man with rare blood.

    Yes it would be great if Greece followed Icelands example.

  • #196476

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Maybe Sundodge can answer this burning question regarding bacon. We get this wonderful bacon that looks dry and never shrinks and is also quite sticky when it’s cooked, and I wonder why other brands of bacon are sloppy and shrink and juice pours out as if they are being stewed. What is the difference in their making I wonder. Just cooking mine now.

  • #196477

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    He’ll no doubt come in with the expert opinion shortly but I suggest it’s the difference between proper cured bacon and adulterated stuff! ic_wink

  • #196478

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    Bacon – Commercially produced stuff is usually injected with brine & cure mix. This bulks out the volume & you pay for the liquid content on top of the meat. When cooked the bacon looses most of the liquid, shrinks & you get that nasty white scum in the pan. Dry curing is the way to get good bacon – This entails rubbing in the cure mix of sea salt, sugar & a very precise amount of sodium nitrite. The bacon is then vacuum sealed & set in refrigeration for up to three weeks. It is then opened, washed & put back in fridge for 4-5 days to mature, before slicing for use. A total time scale for this bacon is between 3-4 weeks whereas the injected stuff can be turned around in two days. Two different products in quality & taste.

  • #196479

    Sancho the Fat
    Participant
    Neophyte

    How about pre-packaged Greek supermarket sausages, especially those four-packs of revolting ‘xoriatika loukanika’? is there any relation ?

  • #196480

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Yes ,Sancho, they are all brothers 8)

  • #196481

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Well clearly then I have posh taste. Now that I have found the dry cure one I will never go back to the cheaper ones. Actually it’s more economical too because one big rasher is enough for one person, where the cheap one you could cook four and they would shrink to nothing, apart from that revolting burnt scum. Thanks Sundodge.

  • #196482

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    Should look like this ?

  • #196483

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    There you go then, proper bacon!
    Och sunny boy back with your bad habits of showing us tempting food, can’t wait till breakfast… :(

    Mrs K used to work in food microbiology and said nearly all the cheaper production (and often the low fat processed foods) are also not much cop as they have water (in the bacon case above, brine) and binder (plus flavour enhacers, msg, salt, sugar etc. to make up the flavour taken out with the fat) added so you pay a lot for not much more than water. So you buy and eat rubbish or water stuffed food that just shrinks when cooked.
    [It is all a CIA plot to make you poor and buy ready cooked deep fried chicken 😆 ]

  • #196484

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Well I don’t think it’s a CIA plot kolly, just greedy manufacturers. When I was in Sweden, there was a big article in the papers about Arla milk, and urging people to buy full cream 3% milk and just add half water. That way you got 1.5% low fat milk. Same with the cream. Add milk to it and you get light cream. Note that the light products are also more expensive by a few cents. I always eat full fat everything and am of average body weight.

    Sunny I can tell that’s your own production of bacon. reb_bravo I marvel at your abilities and wish I had the courage to try it, but am always scared that instead of bacon I will be serving up massive doses of botulism with eggs and tomatoes.

  • #196485

    Sancho the Fat
    Participant
    Neophyte

    I wonder if the bacon these people make is good – http://allantikastremmenou.blogspot.gr

    (The page is old, but they seem to be still going – click on the Facebook link for more up-to-date news etc. Also here – http://www.bestgreekfood.com/web/stremmenos)

  • #196486

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Looks like a small company and the photo of the Kassler looked pretty good. It mentions smoked bacon. Can’t say I ever saw their stuff in the supermarkets. Maybe they are sold in places like Athinas Street in Athens where the meat markets are.

  • #196487

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Probably true about greedy manufacturers Kiwi – or maybe someone in the supply chain – but low fat milk leaves everything in except the fat that is taken out and is therefore much higher in percentage of calcium! Better for teeth and bones.
    I agree with eat most things too. Little and often and a little bit of what you fancy does you good! Have you seen latest research that a bit of chocolate everyday does you good too? Now I’m all for that! :)) Along with lots of fat, red wine, roasted veg, lots of beans, fresh home grown tomatoes, etc. etc. I should live till. …….I drop!

  • #196488

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    That’s just the point kolly, the fat is not taken out. It gets halved by the percentage of water added to the full fat milk. That’s what the Swedes were on about.

    As for wine…when I get a minute I will upset the entire forum with a link to research that has just come out of NZ that alcohol causes cancer because of the ethanol in it. It was big news here in the last few days and a medical seminar was held on the subject. Makes me wonder because I used to eat very healthy, not smoke, but swilled down local retsina at every meal, and look what happened to me.

  • #196489

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=10620860. A Google search brings up lots more. Pretty soon there won’t be a dammed thing we can enjoy.

    I believe the aftermath of sex also causes life long stress and anxiety…even when the aftermath becomes an adult. :))

  • #196490

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Ha! Really like your last conclusion! So true…..

  • #196491

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    ….I Think that a lot more “On the job” research is needed with that one ! :mrgreen:

  • #196492

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Just for the hell of it I was looking up what fares are to Greece. Cheapest on Expedia was 2300 NZ dollars, mostly going up to almost 3k, so halve it roughly for euros. Then out of curiosity I looked up Malaysian airlines website 1340 dollars return! I notice Expedia did not include it.

    Was toying with the idea…do I want to live to get old (maybe) and die dribbling in some old peoples home, or do I become mourned by the world by going down in a plane crash. The answer was easy 😀

    Quest on BBC was interviewing the new director of Malaysian, a Brit. It has to be good now.

    Oops, fare was to London, with a cunning plan to use the charter airlines to get over to Greece from there.

  • #196493

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Give skyscanner and kayak websites a try, Kiwi. Most of these screen scraper sites have different advantages and results combinations. I like skyscanner best for it’s wide range of searching and cost presentation plus, if you have no fixed date, it can give you a graphical result of best prices during a month, for example. I nearly forgot travelsupermarket too.

  • #196494

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    For somebody with insomnia it must be great to hear that the cheapest bargains are to be found on the sites of the airlines after midnight.

    Also from day to day the prices can differ, even for the same departure date when searching today it can be cheaper in 2 days time.

    Also Thursdays seems to be a good day to search for great airline bargains. Why Thursday? No idea.

    Are you sure Malaysia is still running i.e. flying?
    Thought they were in quite some financial trouble after ‘losing’ (up till date still not found it) a plane last year and the other shot out of the air…

  • #196495

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Skyscanner was good while I was in Europe, here in NZ it sucks. It doesn’t give many choices at all. No idea why. I used to love it. Down this end of the world everything is so different to when in Europe. I guess we are a small population and no one bothers as much. Imagine that Malaysian airlines and many others were not even on the list. Just watching the Greek debate live. Let’s see what will happen in the next week. I find it interesting that The independent hardly mentions it, the Guardian very little but zerohedge is packed, with pages of what’s happening. Wondering if mainstream are scared of starting chaos in financial markets…it’s strange.

  • #196496

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    My next hospital visit is now in six months. Am toying whether to get on a plane and get some Greek sun for the next few months. Am now even more determined to buy a place, but as always timing is everything. I have been away for only seven months now but my mind and heart are still in Greece. Its like a narcotic.

  • #196497

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    Am toying whether to get on a plane and get some Greek sun for the next few months

    .
    Well Kiwi if you decide to make the flight and think a bit of Pelopennese scenery might appeal, our house is vacant and ready for visitors !

    Judging by my visit to the hospital yesterday and the wait I’ve got (for scan / ultrasound / biopsy then back to the consultant, then probable op ), it’s gonna be months before we’ll be there.
    If you’re interested PM me anytime.

  • #196498

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    Hi everyone.
    Back in the land of the internet after a couple of weeks at Luddite Central ( my Mums !).

    How are you all doing especially those of you resident in Greece ?

    The news is full of closed pharmacies and empty shelves in the supermarket and no petrol at the pumps.
    Is this everywhere or are some areas worse than others ?

    I hope you are all ok and still sane ?!

    Looks like I’m going to be in the UK a while longer.
    Hope all gets resolved soon.

  • #196499

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Very sweet of you shazz and appreciated. I will certainly consider it if we go. Still toying with the idea. My timing in everything is always an issue. With my luck I would arrive on the precise day that civil war begins. (That’s tongue in cheek I better add quickly).

    Hope all is going smoothly for you. Remind yourself that this too will end…and it will. I was convinced that I would never be able to do the things I used to again, especially as the months went by and no improvement. Silly little things like waking up and stretching were impossible, and this morning I had the biggest cat stretch when I woke and felt so greatful for that small thing. The other thing that I realised was that no matter how many people you have around you, it’s a lonely road that you have to travel alone. Keep your mind occupied with everything other than yourself. Annoy everyone on GIH like I did 😆

    Warm wishes :nod:

  • #196500

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    I feel annoyed already! Imagine suggesting anyone on GIH is sane….. 😆

    Keep your chin up Shazzie, very frustrating I know but better to take a bit of time and get things right!

  • #196501

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150630135258.htm

    Blame your naughty little habit on your genes.

  • #196502

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    @Shazzie wrote:

    The news is full of closed pharmacies and empty shelves in the supermarket and no petrol at the pumps.
    Is this everywhere or are some areas worse than others ?

    Let you know tonight Shazzie. We are off to the big K later so will find out how AB &Lidl are coping.

    Down here in the sticks, our supermarket shelves are full and the pharmacy didn’t seem short of stuff.

    8)

  • #196503

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Now this is really something to worry about. Ever wonder how healthy eating fish is now with all the nuclear waste leaking from Fukushima and now this. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jul/03/runit-dome-pacific-radioactive-waste

  • #196504

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    @kiwi wrote:

    Now this is really something to worry about. Ever wonder how healthy eating fish is now with all the nuclear waste leaking from Fukushima and now this. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jul/03/runit-dome-pacific-radioactive-waste

    What I want to know is why the USA didn’t carry out their nuclear tests in a less important place where all this contamination wouldn’t matter, like Los Angeles, or Las Vegas, or even New York or Washington? An 18 inch concrete slab over those and the occasional leaching of contaminates wouldn’t have mattered at all! And more importantly, nobody would have noticed the lowering of intelligence! :retard:

  • #196505

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    @the reiver wrote:

    Let you know tonight Shazzie

    OK, the downside. Cafes in the big square were quite quiet, smallish queues at certain ATMs.

    Upside. AB & Lidl no problems with stock levels. Seen it worse after the Easter break when it looks like WW3.

    No money at Praktiker ATM’s but not surprised as these are the nearest for residents on the Thouria side of Kalamata.

    8)

  • #196506

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    Thanks for that Reiver.

    It’s good to know our fellow Kalamatians are ok so far.

  • #196507

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I hope People do realise that banking by internet is still working. I

    I just heard some tourists being interviewed and they sounded ok, they said money from cash machines worked and many had come with cash anyway. Some Norwegians even said,’don’t be scared, come to Greece.’ Nice of them.

  • #196508

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    My pleasure Shazzie. Get well soon ! :))

    Went to an ATM Saturday and there was a Greek guy punching the buttons. When he finished I asked him if all ok, he smiled ruefully and showed me his 3×20 notes.

    My UK card coughed up crisp 50’s so I was happy. ic_wink

    Sunday, who knows, although a Greek friend suggested 60% “oxi” and 40% “nai”

    8)

  • #196509

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    He was lucky to get 3 x 20 most machines apparently have run out of twentys and spit out fifty.

    Now, should we be saying that any publicity is good publicity? Greece is very much on the map now! Thousands of reporters have converged.

    As long as this situation doesn’t trigger a civil war, which could soon ignite if matters don’t improve very soon after the vote. People are so weary of poverty and hopelessness and the most dangerous people are those with nothing to lose. Surely Europe is not going to risk a war right at the doorway to the Middle East. Will Greece become a Sarajevo?

  • #196510

    jodevizes
    Participant
    Oracle

    Well, as it’s Sunday, no one will take any notice if the Army is out polishing their tanks :)

  • #196511

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    From what I can see on TV things are quiet. Watching the results, am amazed that in some places up to 92% voted No. Well at least they were not divided so no chance of war in those places :))

  • #211092

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Not that anyone needs to care…but I had to go to the dentist yesterday. Get this. The Hygeinist decided I needed four appointments to clean my teeth…one hour each.

    She charged me $185 to do the first 8 teeth. Mental note…cancel the other three appointments on the basis that paying almost $800 for teeth to be cleaned is EXCESSIVE!

    Dentist..gave me six injections for one filling…is your lip numb yet he asks. Nope. Oh Dear…10% of the population have this problem I am informed.   Eventually a semi desired result happens and he fills the tooth.

    cost $350  and I have one more filling to go.

    Conclusion, it is cheaper to get on a plane and go to Greece to my darling dentist in Thess and tip him generously on top of his fee.

    Did I mention that the results of the injections are a rather ugly red rash over most of my face and which refuses to budge. :-(

     

  • #211093

    The Grocer
    Participant
    Oracle

    Kiwi..

    I have found Greece is far, far cheaper for dentistry and we are lucky as we have a tremendous dentist in Kalamata. I have some work done on my teeth that resulted in 4 visits, a full tooth rebuild at a cost of 150 euro…

    In fact better treatment, far more up to date than the dentist I had in the U.K.

    Save your money, holiday in Greece and have the work there!

  • #211170

    the reiver
    Participant
    Oracle

    Right on Grocer. My wife had a clean last week for 40 euros  :good:

     

    😎

  • #211172

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    Any good dentist on Evia? I don’t like my new Dutch dentist  😳  I don’t think he likes me anymore since my last visit I refused a treatment of 9000 euros and decided to have the tooth be taken out. Rather a big gap between my teeth than a big gap in my budget  😀

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 10 months ago by  Alien.
  • #211204

    altohb
    Participant
    Hoplite

    We have a wonderful dentist here in Crete – prices lower than the UK, and the best treatment either of us has ever had.

    I spotted the other day that a dentist at the “other” end of Crete is advertising dental holidays – as suggested above!

  • #211208

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    I use a guy in Istiaia for years now. He did me a real good three-element bridge (front teeth got knocked out when I was a kid and the old work was definitely due for replacement) for €600.- total. I’m more than pleased with the guy, both for his prices, the quality of his work and his reluctance to do any work he deems not to be necessary (he’ll do it if you want to but he does not push it on you)

    Edit: One thing I forgot to mention: he speaks only Greek. If that’s a problem you’ll need some to translate for you.

  • #211539

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Quite right grocer. I have decided to cancel all my other appointments on the basis that I still have this hellish rash and don’t need an encore.  What I love about Greek Dentists is that they don’t charge per visit, but per job, no matter how many times you go.

    Alien, get a bridge made in Greece. It’s worth it and now the gap where the tooth has been pulled will be settled down.

    My guy in Thess would do it within a week, but Ian’s sounds good and is where you are going to be. He will only have to take a moulding and get the tooth made and stick it in.

    I remember starting a Dentist thread a while back, maybe everyone could post the details of their dentists there for future reference.

  • #211540

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    Only Greek cann’t be a problem: I always find it very difficult when the dentist starts a conversation with his hands in my mouth I cannot answer  :scratch:

  • #211541

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    I would be very happy with details of the dentist: do I have to make an appointment well in advance?

    My neighbour in Rovies is a dentist, must admit I don’t realy understand much of him because he only speeks Greek too. Only he works in Athens and I don’t feel like going there for a treatment.

    Usualy speeking little Greek isn’t such a problem as they can write the amount on a piece of paper and during the treatment not much can be said  😛

  • #211908

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    OK, sorry it took awhile. I’m in the Netherlands because of some family stuff.

    I don’t have the guys’ last name here but his first name is Niko.

    If you go from the platia in Istiaia towards Voutas via 25 Martiou, then on your right hand, about 100 metres from the platia, there’s a pharmacion with next to it an open hallway.

    The signs in the hallway will show you there are all kinds of doctors in the building.
    Niko is on the first floor.

    His phonenumber is 2226 054650

  • #211916

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    Don’t say sorry! Family stuff doesn’t sound good, hope all is well!

    Thanks for the info, always better to hear from somebody who has experience with a doctor or dentist before I go.

     

  • #212572

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Daughter just got back from a wedding in Chicago. Along with a lost suitcase ( yes luggage loss runs in the family) she arrived to find her account overdrawn and 8 k  missing. Seems that when she was in LA airport she took money out of a cash machine and the card was skimmed. They had ten days to spend up large. How do you protect yourself when they have put an extra part in the cash machines to skim.

     

  • #212574

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    Oh Kiwi, so sorry to hear that how awful for your daughter.

    Hopefully the bank will reimburse her as it wasn’t her fault.

  • #215055

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I was reminded of Robin Williams in the film where he plays the doctor. The books could be interesting.

    http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/aug/30/oliver-sacks-clinician-of-compassion-unique-literary-gift

  • #215058

    jodevizes
    Participant
    Oracle

    His autobiography was just read on the BBC. He was quite a druggie in his early years. I loved that film.

  • #215063

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Argh!  SJS  please do something to fix this problem. I clicked on this post to see the reply, and I had to scroll/swipe for ages to get to the end so I could see the above response. It’s too hard.

    We need pages with numbers so we can just click on the last page to get to the response.

  • #215066

    jodevizes
    Participant
    Oracle

    Amen to that.  reb_bravo

  • #215067

    Stella
    Participant
    Hoplite

    Agree whole heartedly!  Anything done for pleasure like joining in with a chat is just too difficult.  Is there any way I can see unread posts or do I have to start at the beginning every time?  I cope Ok with other fora but this defeats and irritates me.

    Rant over!

  • #215068

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    Especially this post is very very very slow.

    Not only opening, but also to reply.

    First time I opened it, indeed I had to scroll through, but now I tried to click on the last post (Stella in this case) and wow in one go I was at the last reply.

    Had to scroll up a few posts, but it was much quicker than scrolling through at this slow. Even typing is too much for this new forum when a post has become quite long.

  • #215069

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I just figured out an easy way to get to the last post…I click on reply, and then work upwards to the last posts.

    Sjs typing this is cumbersome with the iPad, as alien says it’s slow and lags.

    Another trick is to use the red bell to answer your posts, clicking on them takes you to the latest answer to you post, and then if you click reply, it will take you to the bottom of the last post so you can work up. Argh…there has to be a better way. Put page numbers Sjs or the word last page that we can click on to get to the end.

  • #215093

    Stella
    Participant
    Hoplite

    What red bell?  Kiwi, you are seeing something I am not.  I have black and grey symbols on the left and I do not know what they mean.  Is there some sort of index to them, please?

  • #215094

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    When someone answers one of your posts a red bell appears on the bottom right which you click on and it will say something like…kiwi has answered your post. You can click on it and it will take you to that thread. Then the easiest way to get to the bottom of the page click on reply, then scroll up.

    Start a new post yourself Stella and when someone answers hopefully you will see the bell

  • #215095

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    image

    Here is a screen shot Stella. After I clicked on the bell.

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
  • #215100

    Stella
    Participant
    Hoplite

    Ah, I see now what you mean.  Thank you, Kiwi.

  • #215101

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Dont forget to use the ‘reply’ button to take you closer to the last post so you don’t need to swipe or scroll for hours to get there. It’s a clumsy answer to the problem but it’s a workaround.

    So Brenda how did you find Greece?

     

     

  • #215102

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    On the surface, everything seemed the same as always. At my family’s kafenion in the village, the same guys are there every day playing cards and tavli. But, they’re quieter. The children still come in every day for their treats. The thing I noticed most in the village was the absence of the “visitors”…people who moved to other countries years ago who normally come back to the village for the summer.Most said they were staying away this year because of a fear of the unknown…possible airport disruptions, for example. I have to admit that thought was in the back of my mind as well. I do my shopping in the city of Tripoli and it was just as busy and bustling as always. There were always a lot of people in the supermarket and restaurants, cafes, etc. But, I noticed more stores had closed since last year.  Many, many buildings had “for rent” signs. But, on the road from Tripoli to our village, a giant new toy store has opened. Of course, the influx of immigrants is front and centre in the news and the videos on TV are upsetting to everyone. They’re expecting Tsipras to be re-elected, and the feeling is “after that, who knows?” So, they’re just going along, living their lives as close to normally as they can…and the phrase most heard is “Τι να κάνουμε.”

  • #215149

    jodevizes
    Participant
    Oracle

    I just came back from Athens and I saw quite a few empty shops. A bit like Margate. Very sad.

  • #215159

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Update from a small island (Kefellini). My ‘landlady’ Kiria Happy tells me that they are trying to branch out and keep customers or get new ones. Many tourists here are Greek and locals out for the day or a few days but numbers are down significantly. New contract with a UK tour operator but not great especially when it come to income level and communications. I realise it is now no longer considered Greek summer but place is good, studios fine and tavernas not expensive especially by UK standards with tasty food. Studios just 2 of 8 occupied. Several UK run villas seem well occupied and seriously more expensive such as thousand plus per week neat and tidy but lack any charm!

  • #215162

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Great news .kolly glad you are hav g such a good time with no rain this time. . I am typing this and no letters are showing up as I type, but I will still submit it to see what’s going on. It’s weird!

  • #215163

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I swear, I was typing above and could not see the letters being typed! Strangest thing. Could just see the curser position, but as you can see the post showed up when I submitted!

    Take note sjs. Now in this post it works fine.

    I hope you have all noticed that now once you open one of the posts you don’t have to scroll pages to the end to read what was written…it now shows the name of the last poster at the beginning of the thread, and you just need to click on the name to get to the last post…then scroll back. Hope everyone finds this because it’s a great improvement.

    Keep up the updates kolly. Nice that you are in a place that is off the track.

     

  • #215285

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Worth reading. If you get bored with the beginning, at least read from the italics about half way down that describes your contract with a bank.

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-09-05/concept-money-and-money-illusion

    Moral of the story, eggs can’t be trusted in their basket.

     

    SJS…if you see this post please can you check and tell me why in this thread it is impossible to backspace and typing takes ages. There is a lag. Tr Lully with your iPad and see what I mean. Make a mistake and try to back space and re type . Needs to be fixed as its irritatingly difficult and makes me not want to post.

     

  • #215368

    altohb
    Participant
    Hoplite

    I’m glad to report that the tourist situation in this neck of the woods is pretty good this year – they are not all Athenians on holiday, either, but a good multinational mix with not too many Brits (always a good thing imo). We are quite a long way from Heraklion, so none of the UK tour companies come here. The only Brits are independent travellers. Sad to think that one’s own countrymen/women are a blight on so many areas.

  • #215405

    jodevizes
    Participant
    Oracle

    That is why I’m coming to Greece and not France or Spain.

  • #215583

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    :scratch: Just sitting here deciding if I should wait up another half hour for the tsunami to hit, or go to bed and dream about the 1 meter wave expected. Frankly, the swells we get are bigger than this warning. I’ve seen six meter ones from the window on a good day!

  • #215621

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Don’t worry kiwi… as long as you wear your waterwings to bed, you’ll be okay…. just don’t forget to inflate them before you fall asleep though! 😀

     

  • #215623

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    Well, some realy clever person just figured out that it’s a good idea for us to go work 90 Km offshore north-west Ireland next week. :scratch:
    The open Atlantic in late September may show us some real Rock ‘n Roll… :unsure:

  • #215624

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    A lot more than the tsunami we saw her Ian. 80 centimeter waves :yahoo: Civil Defence even kept the warning on for no sightseeing and keep away from the shores until tomorrow! Duh. We were eating fish and chips next to the beach watching the piddly waves breaking. Not even the surfers were out and it’s the most surfey beach here.

     

    I don’t envy you around that coast Ian. It’s rough at the best of times. Be safe.

     

     

  • #220575

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    sjs please fix this thread. When I type it’s fine, if I make a mistake and try to back space erase, each letter erased takes one second, I kid you not. It only happens in long threads.  Not only this. I actually count, one potatoe, two potatoe, etc as the letters are erased. It’s maddening.

  • #223471

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Everyone very busy these days and GIH is devoid of writers. Here Down Under, we have wind, almost daily. I am sick of it. Mr kiwi keeps talking of going to Greece this summer. Holding my breath that I will be well enough. The biggest issue will be health insurance. I am uninsurable now I guess.

    I’m not sure how nice it will be by summer though if the place is inundated with refugees. Seeing the hardship all around may be an upsetting experience. I’d be collecting up all the children to take home with me.

    So, where’s kolly?

     

     

     

  • #223472

    brenda
    Participant
    Hoplite

    You go up to the north, don’t you, kiwi? Thessaloniki? Have you heard anything about how the refugee situation is in that area?

  • #223477

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Thousands there too, they travel there to get to the other borders.

     

    Meanwhile does anyone know of a cheap way to get excess baggage or box from Heathrow to Downunder. Daughter is asking.

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