Did you know?????

Forums Nothing to do with Greece GOM Did you know?????

This topic contains 129 replies, has 17 voices, and was last updated by  poppy1 5 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #157237

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    In 2001, Goldman’s financial alchemists formulated a scheme to allow the Greek government to hide the extent of its rising debt from the public and the European Community’s budget overseers. Under this diabolical deal, Goldman funneled new capital from super-wealthy investors into the government’s coffers,
    in exchange, Greek officials secretly agreed that the investors would get 20 years’ worth of the annual revenue generated by such public assets as Greece’s airports. For its part, Goldman pocketed $300 million in fees paid by the country’s unwitting taxpayers.
    The financial giant dubbed its airport scheme “Aeolus,” after the ancient Greek god of the wind — and, sure enough, any long-term financial benefit for Greece was soon gone with the wind.
    By hiding the fact that the government’s future revenues had been consigned to secret investors, Goldman bankers made the country’s balance sheet look much rosier than it was, allowing Greek officials to keep spending like there was no tomorrow.
    So, who is getting punished for the finagling of Greek politions and the Goldman profiteers? The PEOPLE of course!!!! Greeks now face deep wage cuts, rising taxes and the elimination of public services just so their government can pay off debts the people didn’t even know it had. Meanwhile, Greece’s financial conflagration is endangering the stability of Europe’s currency and causing financial systems worldwide to wobble again. All of this to enrich a handful of global speculators.

    Thanks, Goldman Sachs. :crybaby: 👿 👿 👿

  • #187615

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    And did you also know that it was while the PASOK Government was in power that this happened….?

  • #187616

    Shazzie
    Participant
    Oracle

    OMG !!

    Seriously, does the general population know all this ? Are they so resigned to corruption, that this is considered de rigeur ?

    I can’t decide whether to laugh or cry – oh well I’ll just do both !

  • #187617

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric
  • #187618

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric
  • #187621

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Due to the economic crisis, hundreds of Greeks and immigrants living in Greece are willing to sell their sperm to earn money, especially during summer or before Christmas holidays. Donors consist primarily of young students, doctors or health officials, who must first undergo examinations to determine whether they are carriers of any diseases and whether their sperm can be used. The necessary tests are completed after 20 days.
    According to the law, a man cannot receive more than 200 euros for the necessary medical expenses and transport, but some sperm banks are willing to pay as much as an additional 30-50 euros for each donation.
    According to an article in the Greek newspaper Eleftherotypia, only one out of ten candidates is approved to become a donor and his sperm cannot be used for the birth of more than 10 children. According to an international regulation, each donor is permitted to give sperm only once a week, so he cannot make a living by selling his sperm.
    Each year in Greece, 1000 sperm donations are purchased, usually by unmarried women over 40 years old (50%), and the rest by reproductively challenged couples, or homosexual couples who wish to have a baby.
    The Greek government has imposed a 13% value added tax so that in Greece, sperm is sold for 150 euros plus the VAT.
    Unfortunately, there are risks involved in the industry. Due to austerity measures, there is no longer an authority to control whether the necessary medical tests have taken place, nor is permission being issued. The Greek state does not even know the exact number of sperm banks that exist, nor whether they follow the necessary rules.
    Also, according to information of health officials, there is a sperm bank in the country which has had the same 56 donors for the past ten years. As a result, it is very possible that many children have been born having the same father and living in the same region. Thus, in the future, many ethical issues may be raised. 😆

  • #187622

    DayGloScooter
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Once a WEEK! ic_shock

  • #187623

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Glowwy, it’s called cutting out the middleman 😆 😆 😆
    But you could always open an Account but no guarantees you will get much Interest though :mozilla_innocent: :mozilla_innocent: :mozilla_tongue:

  • #187624

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    What if you prefer to donate directly rather than through (shady) bank dealings? 😳

    ic_wink

  • #187625

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    Do I understand that donating sperm is still anonymous in Greece ic_shock

  • #187626

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    No-one Knows 😆 😆 😆 😆 Alien

  • #187628

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    did you know that donkey milk is the closest to mother’s milk and also far more healthy than cow milk. Asses milk contains less fat, more proteins and some 60 % more vitamin C. Donkey milk also has no harmful bacteria so you do not have to pasteurize it. So why do we not drink donkey milk?
    The oldest woman in the world lived in Ecuador. She died at the age of 116! After her death her children told the press that the secret of their mother’s great age might have been regular drinking of donkey milk.
    Here in Greece they do not drink donkey milk. The big number of donkeys that Greece used to have were used for transport or to mill grain or olives. For example a donkey could walk forever in circles to get the olive oil out of the olives. Now that machinery and cars have put the donkeys out of work, the number of donkeys in Greece have decreased so much that they could almost be added to the list of endangered animals.

  • #187629

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Donkey Milk Cheese

    You might assume you’d have to pay people to eat cheese made from donkey milk, but doing so would make an ass of u and me. Actually the opposite is true: at $1,350 or €1,000 per kilogram (around $612 per lb.), donkey milk cheese is the most expensive cheese you can buy.
    Dubbed “Pule” and made from the milk of Balkan donkeys, this pale yellow semi-hard cheese is produced at the Zasavica Special Nature Reserve in Serbia. About 100 donkeys roam the reserve’s lush meadows; the sale of donkey products including Pule cheese and donkey milk liqueur (seriously) helping to pay their way. It’s said that Cleopatra owed her legendary beauty to regular baths in donkey milk, so if donkey milk cheese turns you off, you just might be in de Nile.

  • #187627

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Did you know
    Organized Labor
    According to reliable data from Athens municipal authorities, there are approximately 150 large and deteriorating buildings between Patission Avenue and Metaxourgeio Sreet, right in the center of Athens and close to Omonoia Square and Larisa Station, where 100,000 illegal immigrants are being literally stashed away.
    They are paying organized crime leaders from 2-5 euros per day for “rent.” Authorities say that the leaders of these syndicates have actually bought the buildings and can thus shelter in them those who they have trafficked into the country, thus raising considerable income that it is not declared to the tax service. Of course, such conditions are inhumane as well and in case of a fire or earthquake would lead to a tragic loss of life on a large scale.
    A simple calculation shows that the human trafficking networks, mostly run by Greeks but also by Albanians, Syrians, Egyptians and Nigerians, make from 200,000 to 500,000 euros per day as ‘slum lords.’
    This is in addition to other sources of profit deriving from selling narcotics substances to the immigrants, or using them to sell products as illegal street vendors, prostitution or finding them manual labor- while taking from them a hefty daily commission.
    The results for Greek domestic security and the rising levels of criminality in the urban environment is, as can be understood, becoming a heavy burden for the state system. A Hellenic Police officer dealing with the issue for many years said that “at least 75% of the night shifts in the Athenian Police Departments deals with crimes committed by illegal immigrants and the workload is heavy and quite expensive, costing tens of millions of euros per year for the arrests made, bureaucracy, damages done to police vehicles and state property and other expenditures.”
    The scope of the issue becomes even more compelling when one calculates that in 2010 alone, some 150,000 illegal immigrants entered Greece, almost exclusively from the Middle East, North Africa and the Indian sub-continent. Once employed in Greece, each individual is estimated as generating a minimum annual income of 10,000 euros for the organized crime networks (while being allowed to keep precious little for himself). In short, this makes 1.5 billion euros just from the newcomers (let alone those who have been in Athens for years).
    It has become sort of common knowledge that organized crime kingpins in Greece have acquired hefty profits, along with political clout in order to continue their businesses. The Greek National Intelligence Service (NIS) produced a report in early 2011 that was leaked to the daily paper Ethnos, in which it stated that crime syndicates have been able to create pro-immigrant NGO’s, buy real estate and create “zone of influence” within Athens, so as to construct their ghettos and evade possible police surveillance. In addition, the intelligence report noted that organized crime groups have made the necessary “investments” by buying influence in certain sectors of public opinion, so as to neutralize opposition in many cases.
    Athens Police estimated that foreigners are responsible for 42% of homicides in the Greek capital, 43% of sex attacks, 30% of financial crimes, 33% of vehicle theft, 51% of armed robberies, 45% of sexual trafficking cases, 44% of burglaries and 30% of illegal possession of arms and explosives.
    Since then, it is widely assumed that the analogy has risen to at least 30% of foreigners committing crimes in the city, in parallel with the influx of a new wave of illegal immigrants from 2008 up to early 2011.
    Moreover, since criminal behavior within the immigrant community – including crimes occurring between the immigrant populations themselves – is seldom reported, the full extent of it has not been fully calculated in police reports. This means that in statistical terms, it can be safely assumed that foreigners are involved in almost 80% of street crimes in the city of Athens, and similar figures can be assessed for the rest of the country, especially in other major urban centers.
    The center of Athens alone hosts more than 100 money transfer services. Some 30% of these are believed to be owned by Muslim immigrants who have entered the country over the past 15 years. The overall volume of money transfers from Greece to other states due to immigrant remittances is estimated by Greek banks as amounting to over 5 billion euros per annum. This is even without counting amounts generated by use of the popular Hawala system and other informal means of transfer, such as transferring money through long-distance coaches, raising cash and traveling with it to the source country, or simply exchanges in kind that transfer the value to another tradable commodity.
    The narcotics contraband trade in Greece has also been linked to the immigration movement into the country, though that concerns drugs proliferation, and cannot account for the larger issue of narcotics consumption as a historical and sociological phenomenon.

  • #187619

    nimbus
    Participant
    Homeric

    Ye Gods, I think that I am loosing the will to live :roll:

  • #187620

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    😆 😆 😆 I love Grumpy old men they make me laugh 😆 😆 😆 😆 😆 😆

  • #187630

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    😳 I didn’t know ass/asses was a donkey 😳

  • #187631

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Not even going to ask you what you thought an Ass was then Alien ic_shock ic_shock can only imagine the reply 😆

  • #187632

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    It certainly isn’t something I would like cheese from :mrgreen:

  • #187633

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Greece is home to some of the world’s oldest and most beautiful architectural masterpieces, including The Parthenon and The Acropolis. Both of which are located in Athens, one of the safest capital cities in the world. Which means you don’t have to be overly cautious when you’re walking around at night. And while you’re out and about, keep your eyes peeled for one of their 10 to 15,000 prostitutes. Because while Greece penalizes pimps and requires brothels to have permits, prostitutes are pretty well accepted. They even undergo regular health checks and pay social security. In fact, the Greek government recently revealed a plan to force prostitutes 55 and older into retirement, and provide them with medical and social benefits. 😆 😳

  • #187634

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    I thought the governments were trying to make everybody work longer.

    In the Netherlands the prostitutes even pay tax 8)

  • #187635

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Think if the women had to work longer in that trade Alien the men would be very Happy 😆 😆

  • #187636

    DayGloScooter
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Retirement present, a gold cuff-link?

  • #187637

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    @poppy1 wrote:

    Think if the women had to work longer in that trade Alien the men would be very Happy 😆 😆

    Are you sure?

    Have to be carefull we don’t ‘cross the line’ now 😉

  • #187638

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    @DayGloScooter wrote:

    Retirement present, a gold cuff-link?

    ❓ Only one?

    I think you are a little confused here Dayglo: we are talking prostitutes and not gigolo’s
    A prositute with cuff link?
    Or do you mean ic_shock

  • #187639

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    😆 😆 😆 good one Alien

  • #187640

    DayGloScooter
    Participant
    Neophyte

    @Alien wrote:

    @DayGloScooter wrote:
    Retirement present, a gold cuff-link?

    ❓ Only one?

    I think you are a little confused here Dayglo: we are talking prostitutes and not gigolo’s
    A prositute with cuff link?
    Or do you mean ic_shock

    headws.JPG[/attachment:9zrg1imy]

  • #187641

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    That picture is crap glowwy

  • #187642

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    I only see half a picture 😕

    Is he/she missing these:

  • #187643

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    reb_popo Hey, Dayglo changed the pic reb_popo

  • #187644

    DayGloScooter
    Participant
    Neophyte

    yes it was, but I fixed it. Really, the joke was not worth this much explanation.

  • #187645

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    @DayGloScooter wrote:

    yes it was, but I fixed it. Really, the joke was not worth this much explanation.

    It is now ic_confused

  • #187646

    DayGloScooter
    Participant
    Neophyte

    A quite vulgar explanation can be found here 😳

  • #187647

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    October 10, 2011
    According to figures, some 36,000 illegal immigrants have been caught crossing into Greece This compares to a total of just over 47,000 arrests during the whole of last year.
    Greece is in the process of building a 12.5-kilometer fence in Evros, which is one of the main points of entry for illegal migrants.
    In contrast, AMNA reports that according to data made public by the Harbour Corps., illegal immigrants arrested in their effort to enter Greece over the past ten years total 60,170.
    More specifically, from 2001 to August 31 2011, 60,170 illegal immigrants and 1,352 traffickers were arrested for attempted illegal entry into the country in 3,619 cases, while 953 vessels and 44 vehicles were confiscated.
    Their overwhelming majority attempted to enter the country illegally from Turkey, since the arrested illegal immigrants coming from Turkey are 56,440 and the traffickers 999 in 871 cases.Out of those arrested, 24,422 are Afghans, 7,719 Iraqis, 7,385 Palestinians, 7,296 Somalis, 2,407 Egyptians and in smaller number Iranians, Turks and others.

    October 12, 2011
    Greece considers daily visa-free entry for Turkish citizens
    [/color]A member of the Greek parliament announced on Monday that a study is under way regarding allowing Turkish citizens to enter eastern Greece without a visa for one day.
    Eleni Tsiaousi, deputy of the Evros (Meriç in Turkish) prefecture from the ruling Pan-Hellenic Socialist Movement (PASOK), told the Anatolia news agency that there has been a high demand from Turkish citizens to visit the Evros region without the need for a visa.
    Deputies from the region have therefore asked for help from Prime Minister George Papandreou to facilitate visits from the Turkish side, Tsiaousi said.
    Upon Papandreou’s order, Greek Deputy Foreign Minister Dimitris Dollis initiated a study with the intention of making it possible for Turkish citizens to pay for a one-day, non-visa entry to the Evros region, she said.

  • #187648

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Found this sooooo funny
    WHEN short-sighted pensioner Alf Spence tottered down to his local postbox to send a card, he hoped he hadn’t missed the last collection.
    But as he popped the envelope through the little slot a concerned passerby looked at him with a stunned expression.
    The Good Samaritan tapped befuddled Alf, 91, on the shoulder and explained to him that he wasn’t stood in front of a postbox but had in fact posted his great-grandson’s birthday card into a council DOG POO waste bin!
    Partially-blind Alf, of Bedale, North Yorks, is now facing up to the fact he’s been “posting” his letters, cards and competition entries into a box of steaming pooch turd for the past TWO YEARS! The World War II veteran, who was part of the ill-fated Dieppe Raid in 1942, told a Sunday newspaper “I walked down to the postbox, like I do every week, and began placing our Tommy’s third birthday card in the little slot.
    “A woman walking her dog came up to me, tapped me on the shoulder, and asked what I was doing.
    “I thought she was going to cry when I told her. She held my hand and pointed out that the postbox was on the other side of the road.
    “I’ve not got the best eyesight these days but even so, the postbox and the dog dirt box are almost identical. They’re both red, the same shape and stuck on a post.
    “I bet I’m not the only pensioner to get confused. The bloody council should never have put them so close together.”
    Alf has since contacted Royal Mail telling them to cancel their investigation into the hundreds of missing letters and parcels he’s sent over the last two years.
    The widower, who lost his wife Betsie to the sea in 1989, said: “I accused them of losing my post, saying their service was rubbish. I now owe them an apology.”
    Alf ’s daughter Susan May, 59, told Sunday newspaper she was relieved the riddle of the missing letters had finally been solved.
    The mum of four, from Luton, Beds, said: “Every time I asked dad if he’d remembered one of kids’ birthdays, he’d say, ‘Yes, there’s a cheque in the post’.“When they never showed up we thought he was either losing his marbles or was just plain lying. “So it’s nice to know he was at least trying, bless him.”
    She added: “What I’d like to know is why the people who empty the dog poo box have never wondered why Dad’s letters are in there.
    “Surely they could have passed them on to Royal Mail or forwarded them on to the addressees with a letter saying where they were found?”
    A source at North Yorkshire District Council confirmed they had erected the red dog waste bins in June 2009 –– around the time when Alf’s mail started mysteriously ‘disappearing’. 😆 😆

  • #187649

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Wall Street Protests Spread To City Of London
    Protests against the global financial system are set to hit the City of London as demonstrations that started in New York’s Wall Street spread to the UK.
    Part of a “global movement for real democracy” to highlight social and economic injustice , the action will see an occupation of the heart of the capital’s financial centre.
    A number of campaign organisations, including direct action group UK Uncut, say they will support the Occupy London Stock Exchange protests.
    The so-called OccupyLSX group’s Facebook page on the protest has more than 13,000 followers, with more than 5,000 confirmed attendees.
    Laura Taylor, a supporter of the group, said: “Why are we paying for a crisis the banks caused?
    “More than a million people have lost their jobs and tens of thousands of homes have been repossessed, while small businesses are struggling to survive.
    “Yet bankers continue to make billions in profit and pay themselves enormous bonuses, even after we bailed them out with £850bn.”
    Another supporter, Kai Wargalla, said: “We want to stand with the 99% – the overwhelming majority who value people over profit.
    “We want to make our voices heard against greed, corruption and for a democratic, just society.
    “We stand in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street , protesters in Spain, Greece and the Middle East who started this movement.
    “They have inspired people all over the world to step forward and make their voices heard.”
    OccupyLSX issued a statement that said: “The words corporate greed ring through the speeches and banners of protests across the globe.
    “After huge bailouts and in the face of unemployment, privatisation and austerity, we still see profits for the rich on the increase.”

  • #187650

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Papa Ouzo did you know this
    1) Acclimatisation: For those unused to the hot and dry climate in Greece, acclimatisation can be a nightmare. For many people, the blood thickens as the body attempts to cope with the intense heat, and nosebleeds and swollen ankles are common for those unused to the Greek summer. Drinking plenty of water is always good, but a glass or two of Ouzo thins the blood and alleviates some of the worst symptoms.
    2) Insomnia: If you have trouble sleeping, a couple of Ouzos before you go to bed will help even the worst insomniacs. Greeks tend to sleep during the hottest part of the day, and a slug of Ouzo is better than any sleeping pill.
    3) Liniment: Old Greek men and women rub Ouzo into tired muscles and aching joints, claiming that it relieves the worst symptoms of rheumatism.
    4) Relaxation: Ouzo makes you smile. For people feeling a little nervous or suffering from anxiety, an Ouzo will make you relax and forget your worries for a while. Make sure that you drink with company and good conversation.
    5) Toothache: Ouzo is used to relieve the worst symptoms of toothache, and older Greeks swear by it as an anaesthetic. To be fair, most strong alcoholic drinks have the same effect.
    6) Decongestant: Ouzo certainly clears the head, partly because of the alcohol, but also because of the herbs and spices that make up the unique flavour. A hot Tsipouro with cloves is even better, alleviating the worst symptoms of a heavy cold.
    7) Expectorant: For a chesty cough, many older Greeks rub Ouzo into their chest, claiming that it clears the lungs.
    8) Antiseptic: Greece has a hot climate, and untended wounds can quickly turn septic. A little neat Ouzo is as good an antiseptic as anything.
    9) And last but not least if you mix Ouzo with with Cola it neutralises the Aniseed flavour

  • #187651

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @poppy1 wrote:

    OUZO
    9) And last but not least if you mix Ouzo with with Cola it neutralises the Aniseed flavour

    I think I find the taste of Cola far more repulsive… :

  • #187652

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Now you all see what Papa Ouzo and I have been trying to communicate for years! :mrgreen:

  • #187653

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    @KP wrote:

    Now you all see what Papa Ouzo and I have been trying to communicate for years! :mrgreen:

    I understand ‘communicating’ is quite difficult :mrgreen:

  • #187654

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @KP wrote:

    Now you all see what Papa Ouzo and I have been trying to communicate for years! :mrgreen:

    You guys have been trying for years… :roll:

    Along comes Poppy and she all puts it down in nine, easy to understand, points. :))

    You’re not scoring any points in the “male vs female logic” contest, are you? ic_confused :roll: :

    :mrgreen:

  • #187655

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    That’s as maybe on this forum Ian but this is only a small part of the world as we know it. ic_wink

    So Poppy demonstrates some admirable logic – or at least concise communication – and Paps and KP have been demonstrating the logical results of using Ouzo all over the Peloponnese and Rhodes (not to mention other places) for many years to thousands! reb_bravo reb_bravo reb_bravo

    That probably was just for points 2 & 4. :retard: :retard:

    I doubt if they would expectorate in public ??????? 😳

  • #187656

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    RETSINA

    Although there are many stories of how this drink was created, the most popular theory is that in ancient Greece they would store their wine in vessels. These vessels were not sealed, the air would get to the wine, and spoil it, making it no longer drinkable.
    They found that by sealing these vessels with a resin from the pine trees, the air didn’t spoil the wine and it lasted longer. However, with this process, the resin seeped into the wine whilst it was fermenting and flavoured the wine.
    The Greeks became accustomed to this flavour and gradually expected it.
    Once the wine vessels improved and they no longer needed to seal them with the resin, to keep the Greeks happy, they started to flavour the wine intentionally by adding chunks of the amber coloured resin during the wine making stage.
    If you visit any of the many pine forests in Greece, you will see trees that have had a small chunk of the bark cut out. They then hang a container under this cut to collect the resin as it oozes out of the trees.

    Until recently most retsina was very strong, in fact stronger with the resin added, than in the days when it accidentally seeped into the wine.
    Retsina is most popular as a white or rose wine, the most popular grape used for this is the Savatiano grape.
    if its had resin added to it, it will always be labelled Retsina.

    It is an extremely strong wine. You will find it in bottles, or the local Taverna may serve it in carafes from a barrel.
    Peronally to me it tastes like Izal the toilet cleaner ( not that I have tried drinking it as it probably would drive you clean round the bend 😆 ) .
    It is an acquired taste, it just depends how long you want to spend acquiring the taste!

  • #187657

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    St. Nicholas is important in Greece as the patron saint of sailors. According to Greek tradition, his clothes are drenched with brine, his beard drips with seawater, and his face is covered with perspiration because he has been working hard against the waves to reach sinking ships and rescue them from the angry sea.

    For some uncanny reason this sounds like it could be Nimbus :p :p :nod:

  • #187658

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    @poppy1 wrote:

    St. Nicholas is important in Greece as the patron saint of sailors. According to Greek tradition, his clothes are drenched with brine, his beard drips with seawater, and his face is covered with perspiration because he has been working hard against the waves to reach sinking ships and rescue them from the angry sea.

    For some uncanny reason this sounds like it could be Nimbus :p :p :nod:

    I suppose you’re referring to St. Nimbus? :roll:

  • #187659

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    KP wrote
    I suppose you’re referring to St. Nimbus?
    Description
    Halo (religious iconography) –
    A halo (Greek: ἅλως; also known as a Nimbus, aureole, glory, or gloriole) is a ring of … extensively in statues and Thangka paintings of Buddhist
    They have been used in the iconography of many religions to indicate holy or sacred figures,
    So you could be right KP

  • #187660

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric
  • #187661

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Garlic contains a sulphur-bearing compound called allicin – the chemical that gives its pungent taste and smell, and it’s believed to be the magic component of garlic responsible for its health qualities.
    Most of the recent research on garlic has focused on its ability to lower cholesterol and blood pressure as well as offering protection against strokes and heart disease. Regularly eating garlic also help the body fight off infections because of its antibacterial properties.
    Cooking with garlic: You can get the most out of garlic by crushing, blending or finely slicing its cloves. Allow to stand for a while (to allow the full development of allicin) before adding to cooking. Ideally garlic should be added about 5-10 minutes before the end of cooking to avoid the destruction of the valuable components, even though moderate cooking helps to develop allicin further. Eating garlic daily goes a long way to protect and boost health!

  • #187662

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Big Brother is watching!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Check this out …
    This is the photo taken by Port Moody photographer Ronnie Miranda that appeared in Tri-City News, Friday (24-June).
    This is actually scary. You can see – perfectly – the faces of every single individual – and there were thousands!
    Privacy? Just think what the police and the military have at their disposal.
    Play with this system awhile, turn it on and off and you will learn how Cool it is to operate.
    This New Technology is Amazing !!!!
    This is the crowd before the Vancouver riot.
    Put your cursor anywhere in the crowd and double-click a couple of times and then use the roll button in the centre of your mouse.

    http://www.gigapixel.com/image/gigapan-canucks-g7.html

  • #187663

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Amazing! Yes and creepy. Maybe they can find a camera that can show the faces through hoodies. That would be helpful in Greece.

  • #187664

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    The Octopus

    You can’t help being suspicious about the Greeks if you ever see how they treat their octopuses. The scenes of violence you can witness along the 16,000 kilometres of Greek coast are too shocking for people with a humane attitude to the animal world.
    If you see fishermen battering the poor octopuses against the rocks – with all their might, 40 times in a row -there is just one way to forgive them: eat a piece of the victim.
    There is hardly a nation in Europe to cook octopus as barbarically and yet as deliciously as the Greeks. There is a direct connection to the beating exercise. This is done for the meat to soften; otherwise it will be as tough as cow’s hide. It has been said that some modern heretics have exchanged the distressing ritual for tumble-drying or deep-freezing, but both are disagreeable methods of affecting the octopus’s cell structure.

    Octopus is one of the most popular foods in Greece, where they cook it in over 100 ways: from sun-dried and then sprinkled with olive oil, vinegar, and marjoram to the “Christmas octopus” with cinnamon, sultanas, and apples.
    No matter what dish they are planning to turn it into, the Greeks normally clean and boil it first. This is done even when they are about to grill it.
    One of the more important late-autumn recipes is for octopus and white aubergine salad. The vegetables are cut in two, lengthwise, and then baked in an oven until they turn soft. Afterwards the seeds are removed to the advantage of the more fundamental ingredients in the meal.
    The preparations should start a day earlier because the octopus, boiled and chopped into pieces, has to be marinated for 12 hours. Finally, it is mixed with half a cup of finely-cut onions and parsley, a red tomato cut into 2.5-centimetre cubes, and a pinch of the omnipresent Greek oregano. The mixture is then poured into the scooped-out aubergines.
    You’d better dress it with some more olive oil because the rule of thumb in Greek cuisine is “keep everything well-oiled and every glass well-filled.”

  • #187665

    nimbus
    Participant
    Homeric

    I trust Poppy that you are not claiming this piece as all your own work, and that it is merely an oversight that you have not given due credit to the author of Octopus’s Garden…Albena Shkodrova :nod:

  • #187666

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Not at all Nimbi i just read it and thought I would put under Did you know.
    As you put it, it was an oversight, my deepest apologies 😳 😉
    Seems like I have managed to upset you twice in a week 😆 😆
    :mozilla_innocent:

  • #187667

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    If anybody is even vaguely interested in the results of this years’ census there are some (preliminary) statistics to be found here.

    Seems that the population density in our area is about 20 per km².
    That explains why it’s so quiet… 😀

  • #187668

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    @Ian wrote:

    If anybody is even vaguely interested in the results of this years’ census there are some (preliminary) statistics to be found here.

    Seems that the population density in our area is about 20 per km².
    That explains why it’s so quiet… 😀

    :roll: Depends who your neighbours are, maybe your neighbours don’t think it is so queit :mrgreen:

  • #187669

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @Alien wrote:

    @Ian wrote:
    If anybody is even vaguely interested in the results of this years’ census there are some (preliminary) statistics to be found here.

    Seems that the population density in our area is about 20 per km².
    That explains why it’s so quiet… 😀

    :roll: Depends who your neighbours are, maybe your neighbours don’t think it is so queit :mrgreen:

    :angry:

    You know my house so you should know that my next-door neighbour is at least 500m down the road.
    Even I am not that noisy!

    OK, they’ll probably hear me when I take the big bike for a spin. :))

  • #187671

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    She knows your house ian? What should our wicked minds surmise from that?

  • #187670

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @kiwi wrote:

    She knows your house ian? What should our wicked minds surmise from that?

    I’m sure you can come up with something quite sordid without my help! :unibrow:

    ic_wink

  • #187672

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Investment Advice

    If you had purchased £1,000 of shares in Delta Airlines one year ago, you would have £49.00 today.

    If you had purchased £1,000 of shares in AIG one year ago, you would have £33.00 today.

    If you had purchased £1,000 of shares in Lehman Brothers one year ago, you would have £0.00 today.

    But, if you had purchased £1,000 worth of beer one year ago, drank all the beer, then turned in the aluminium cans for recycling refund, you would have received £214.00.

    Thus, based on the above, the best current investment plan is to drink heavily & recycle.

    A recent study found that the average Briton walks about 900 miles a year.
    Another study found that Britons drink, on average, 22 gallons of alcohol a year.
    That means that, on average, Britons get about 41 miles to the gallon!

    Makes you proud to be British, doesn’t it?

  • #187673

    nimbus
    Participant
    Homeric

    Now that Poppy is an interesting post ! so don’t let me see you saying that your posts are not appreciated again, I am sure that they are all well liked by different people in different ways 😆 I am sure that even KP will enjoy that one when he returns from his latest flight of fancy :nod:

  • #187674

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    In the 1400’s a law was set forth in England that a man was allowed to beat his wife with a stick no thicker than his thumb.
    Hence we have ‘the rule of thumb’

    Many years ago in Scotland , a new game was invented.
    It was ruled ‘Gentlemen Only…Ladies Forbidden’.. .
    and thus, the word GOLF entered into the English language.

    The first couple to be shown in bed together on prime time TV was Fred and Wilma Flintstone

    Coca-Cola was originally green.

    It is impossible to lick your elbow.

    The cost of raising a medium-size dog
    to the age of eleven:
    £ 10,120.00

    The first novel ever
    written on a typewriter, Tom Sawyer.

    Each king in a deck of playing cards represents
    a great king from history:

    Spades – King David

    Hearts – Charlemagne

    Clubs -Alexander, the Great

    Diamonds – Julius Caesar

    111,111,111 x
    111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987, 654,321

    If a statue in the park of a person on a horse has both front legs in the air, the person died in battle.
    If the horse has one front leg in the air, the person died because of wounds received in battle.
    If the horse has all four legs on the ground, the person died
    of natural causes


    Q.. If you were to spell out numbers, how far would you have to go until you would find the letter ‘A’?

    A. One thousand



    Q. What do bulletproof vests, fire escapes, windshield wipers and laser printers have in common?

    A. All were invented by women.



    Q. What is the only food that doesn’t spoil?

    A. Honey


    In Shakespeare’s time, mattresses were secured on bed frames by ropes.
    When you pulled on the ropes, the mattress tightened,
    making the bed firmer to sleep on.
    Hence the phrase…’Goodnight , sleep tight’


    It was the accepted practice in Babylon 4,000 years ago that for a month after the wedding, the bride’s father would supply his son-in-law with all the mead he could drink. Mead is a honey beer and because their calendar was lunar based, this period was called the honey month, which we know today as the honeymoon.



    In English pubs, ale is ordered by pints and quarts….
    So in old England , when customers got unruly, the bartender would yell at them ‘Mind your pints and quarts, and settle down. It’s where we get the phrase: ‘mind your P’s and Q’s’


    Many years ago in England , pub frequenters had a whistle baked into the rim, or handle, of their ceramic cups. When they needed a refill, they used the whistle to get some service. ‘Wet your whistle’
    is the phrase inspired by this practice.


    At least 75% of people who read this will try to
    lick their elbow!



    YOU KNOW YOU ARE LIVING IN 2011 when…

    1. You accidentally enter your PIN on the microwave.

    2. You haven’t played solitaire with real cards in years.

    3. You have a list of 15 phone numbers to reach your family
    of three.

    4. You e-mail the person who works at the desk next to you.

    5. Your reason for not staying in touch with friends and family is that they don’t have e-mail addresses.

    6. You pull up in your own driveway and use your mobile phone to see if anyone is home to help you carry in the groceries…

    7. Every commercial on television has a web site at the bottom
    of the screen

    8. Leaving the house without your mobile phone, which you didn’t even have the first 20 or 30 (or 60) years of your life, is now a cause for panic and you turn around to go and get it

    10. You get up in the morning and go on line before getting
    your coffee

    11. You start tilting your head sideways to smile. : )

    12 You’re reading this and nodding and laughing.

    13. Even worse, you know exactly to whom you are going to forward this message.

    14. You are too busy to notice there was no 9 on this list.

    15. You actually scrolled back up to check that there wasn’t
    a 9 on this list

  • #187675

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    IRISH MEDICAL DICTIONARY

    Artery…………………….. The study of paintings.
    Bacteria………………….. Back door to cafeteria.
    Barium……………………. What doctors do when patients die.
    Benign…………………….. What you be, after you be eight..
    Caesarean Section…… A neighbourhood in Rome ..
    Catscan…………………… Searching for Kitty.
    Cauterize………………… Made eye contact with her.
    Colic………………………. A sheep dog.
    Coma……………………… A punctuation mark.
    Dilate…………………….. To live long.
    Enema……………………. Not a friend.
    Fester…………………….. Quicker than someone else.
    Fibula……………………. A small lie.
    Impotent………………… Distinguished, well known.
    Labour Pain…………… Getting hurt at work.
    Medical Staff…………. A Doctor’s cane.
    Morbid………………….. A higher offer.
    Nitrates………………….. Cheaper than day rates.
    Node………………………. I knew it.
    Outpatient……………… A person who has fainted.
    Pelvis…………………….. Second cousin to Elvis.
    Post Operative………. A letter carrier.
    Recovery Room……… Place to do upholstery.
    Rectum………………….. Nearly killed him.
    Secretion……………….. Hiding something.
    Seizure…………………… Roman emperor.
    Tablet……………………. A small table.
    Terminal Illness……… Getting sick at the airport.
    Tumour………………….. One plus one more.
    Urine……………………… Opposite of you’re out.

  • #187676

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    “I’m 76 and I’m Tired” – by Bill Cosby
    I am not a racist and I am not intolerant, but I can understand where this guy is coming from…everyone deserves a second (and maybe a third) chance but you cannot hand out chances each and every time someone abuses the system.

    This should be required reading for every man, woman and child in the UK , USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and SOUTH AFRICA, etc.

    I’m 76 Except for brief period in the 50’s when I was doing my National Service, I’ve worked hard since I was 17. Except for some serious health challenges, I put in 50-hour weeks, and didn’t call in sick in nearly 40 years. I made a reasonable salary, but I didn’t inherit my job or my income, and I worked to get where I am. Given the economy, it looks as though retirement was a bad idea, and I’m tired. Very tired.

    I’m tired of being told that I have to “spread the wealth” to people who don’t have my work ethic. I’m tired of being told the government will take the money I earned, by force if necessary, and give it to people too lazy to earn it.

    I’m tired of being told that Islam is a “Religion of Peace,” when every day I can read dozens of stories of Muslim men killing their sisters, wives and daughters for their family “honour”; of Muslims rioting over some slight offense; of Muslims murdering Christians and Jews because they aren’t “believers”; of Muslims burning schools for girls; of Muslims stoning teenage rape victims to death for “adultery”; of Muslims mutilating the genitals of little girls; all in the name of Allah, because the Qur’an and Shari’a law tells them to.

    I’m tired of being told that out of “tolerance for other cultures” we must let Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries use our oil money to fund mosques and madrassa Islamic schools to preach hate in Australia, New Zealand, UK, America and Canada, while no one from these countries are allowed to fund a church, synagogue or religious school in Saudi Arabia or any other Arab country to teach love and tolerance..

    I’m tired of being told I must lower my living standard to fight global warming, which no one is allowed to debate.

    I’m tired of being told that drug addicts have a disease, and I must help support and treat them, and pay for the damage they do. Did a giant germ rush out of a dark alley, grab them, and stuff white powder up their noses or stick a needle in their arm while they tried to fight it off?

    I’m tired of hearing wealthy athletes, entertainers and politicians of all parties talking about innocent mistakes, stupid mistakes or youthful mistakes, when we all know they think their only mistake was getting caught. I’m tired of people with a sense of entitlement, rich or poor.

    I’m really tired of people who don’t take responsibility for their lives and actions, I’m tired of hearing them blame the government, or discrimination or some big-whatever for their problems.

    I’m also tired and fed up with seeing young men and women in their teens and early 20’s bedeck themselves in tattoos and face studs, thereby making themselves un-employable and then claiming money from the Government

    Yes, I’m damn tired. But I’m also glad to be 76… Because, mostly, I’m not going to have to see the world these people are making.
    I’m just sorry for my granddaughter and her children. Thank God I’m on the way out and not on the way in.

  • #187677

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    How to achieve good vision while driving during a heavy downpour.
    I’m not sure why it is so effective; just try this method when it rains
    heavily. This method was told by a Police friend who had experienced
    and confirmed it. It is useful…even driving at night.

    Most motorists would turn on HIGH or FASTEST SPEED of the wipers
    during heavy downpour, yet the visibility in front of the windshield is
    still bad…….
    In the event you face such a situation, just put on your SUNGLASSES
    (any model will do), and miracles! All of a sudden, your visibility in
    front of your windshield is perfectly clear, as if there is no rain.

    Make sure you always have a pair of SUNGLASSES in your car. You are not
    only helping yourself to drive safely with good vision, but also might
    save your friend’s life by giving him this idea.. Try it yourself and
    share it with your friends!!!!
    Amazingly, you still see the drops on the windshield, but not the sheet
    of rain falling. You can see where the rain bounces off the road. It
    works to eliminate the “blindness” from passing cars. Or the “kickup”
    if you are following a car in the rain.

  • #187678

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    The British Government provides the following financial assistance:-

    BRITISH OLD AGED PENSIONER (bearing in mind they worked hard and paid their Income Tax and National Insurance contributions to the British government all their working life) Weekly allowance: £106.00
    IMMIGRANTS/REFUGEES LIVING IN BRITAIN (No Income Tax and National Insurance contribution whatsoever) Weekly allowance: £250.00
    BRITISH OLD AGED PENSIONER Weekly Spouse allowance: £25.00
    ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS/REFUGEES LIVING IN BRITAIN Weekly Spouse allowance: £225.00
    BRITISH OLD AGED PENSIONER Additional weekly hardship allowance £0.00
    ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS/REFUGEES LIVING IN BRITAIN Additional weekly hardship allowance £100.00
    A British old age pensioner is no less hard up than an illegal immigrant/refugee yet receives nothing

    BRITISH OLD AGED PENSIONER TOTAL YEARLY BENEFIT £6,000
    ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS/REFUGEES LIVING IN BRITAIN TOTAL YEARLY BENEFIT: £29,900

  • #187679

    nimbus
    Participant
    Homeric

    You know Poppy, I just don’t want to believe that your last posting is factual….. but I have a horrible suspicion that it is. :

  • #187680

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    😯 UK also pays illegals? How illegal is it then to be illegal 😕

  • #187681

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric
  • #187682

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    While I am here, what would I come under that would be worth my while to stay… :))

  • #187683

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    You would be classed as The Fairy Grandmother Kiwi

  • #187684

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    But that’s not on the list!

  • #187685

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Well it should be reb_bravo

  • #187686

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Most Haunted Places in Greece unless you know different

    Athens – Maroussi Cemetery – Lot of people seen as they pass with their cars a crying girl outside of the cemetery at Maroussi .When they trying to see that little girl again with car’s mirror little girl it’s not their. Just disappear. Many people say that her name was Anna.

    Athens – Penteli – Daveli’s Cave – This cave holds history of paranormal activity, which was first recorded by many Ancient Greece residents and, at that time, considered as “acts of the Gods”. Many reports of UFOs, strange creatures, and paranormal activity, probably due to electromagnetic fields in the area. Phenomena are not as frequent now, however it is a great site for novice ghost hunters

    Sparti – Riviotisa – “Ioanis Koukoutsis” Walks on cemetery grounds after twelve. Legend has it that he went crazy after he had finished work at his butcher shop, once he arrived home he brought with him a razor sharp butcher knife and decapitated his wife as she slept peacefully in there room on the left side of the bed, unfortunately no one had heard neither of there screams or moans. Once finished his execution he committed. After school his daughter Vaso and her friend who has asked for her name to not be revealed, had just arived at the house to witness the bloody massacre. Till this day Ioanis’s ghost walks the cemetery grounds.

  • #187687

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Mastic Gum comes from the resin that seeps like teardrops from the bark of the mastic tree (Pistacia lentiscus).
    It is an exclusively Greek product, because although the mastic tree grows in many places it only sheds its tears, thus producing its valuable crystals, in the Aegean island of Chios.

    Since then numerous endeavours to grow the mastic tree in other Greek regions and countries have been reported, but always without successful results.
    According to scientific evidence, this phenomenon is related to the temperate climate of the island and the underwater volcanic zone of the area and Chios’ ground which is rich in limestone.
    Though they may live to be more than 100 years old, mastic trees don’t begin to ooze resin until after their fifth year and remain productive until after they reach 70. The resin usually takes 10 to 20 days to crystallize and the first harvest in the second half of August yields bigger tears. The second harvest lasts from mid-September until mid-October or the first rain storm, while cleaning the crystals for processing may last until pruning time.

    In cooking, mastic flavours Greek cakes and breads, myriad confections an ouzo-like liqueur, and a chewing gum. It is also used in making varnishes and adhesives. But the most important thing about mastic today is that scientists are confirming what earlier savants had observed and Hippocrates had pointed out: mastic is good for myriad ailments. For example, a research team from the UK’s Nottingham University has found that even small amounts of mastic can destroy the helicobakter pylori bacteria, which only a decade ago was recognised as the prime cause of peptic ulcers and stomach cancer.

    Furthermore, mastic adhesive bandages heal rather than hurt your skin, as do mastic-based surgical sutures; mastic appears to be able to lower cholesterol levels, it has an anti-inflammatory properties, acts as an antioxidant (smoothing wrinkles inside and out) and may even offer protection against arteriosclerosis. Yesterday’s panacea is looking increasingly like tomorrow’s wonder drug. It may even raise gum-chewing out of the gutter and back into polite society. And to think that it’s completely natural.
    According to European Union Law (123/1997), the Chios Mastic Gum has been accepted and established as a Greek product, and so Greece is the only country that has the right to produce it.

  • #187688

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    I’m not a bit worried about my inside wrinkles, just the outside ones. So what does one do? MAstic is like stones, do you crush it and apply to the face or eat it.

  • #187689

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    @kiwi wrote:

    I’m not a bit worried about my inside wrinkles, just the outside ones. So what does one do? MAstic is like stones, do you crush it and apply to the face or eat it.

    Never been to the specialised mastic shop in Greece?

    There is one at Athens airport 😉

  • #187690

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    SOMETHING I DID NOT KNOW BUT IS VERY USEFUL…….

    ATM PIN Number Reversal – Good to Know !! If you should ever be forced by a robber to withdraw money from an ATM machine, you can notify the police by entering your PIN in reverse.

    For example, if your pin number is 1234, then you would put in 4321. The ATM system recognizes that your PIN number is backwards from the ATM card you placed in the machine. The machine will still give you the money you requested, but unknown to the robber, the police will be immediately dispatched to the location.
    All ATM�s carry this emergency sequencer by law.

    This information was recently broadcast on Crime Stoppers however it is seldom used because people just don’t know about it.

    Not available in Greece :roll:

  • #187691

    The Grocer
    Participant
    Oracle

    Poppy, I think you will find this is not correct…..

    have a look at :-
    http://www.snopes.com/business/bank/pinalert.asp

  • #187692

    nimbus
    Participant
    Homeric

    @poppy1 wrote:

    SOMETHING I DID NOT KNOW BUT IS VERY USEFUL…….
    Not available in Greece :roll:

    Oh yes really useful here then. I dont thinks so :roll:

  • #187693

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Thanks Grocer I was under the same impression as you before you edited your post,
    but now stand corrected, apologies, I got it wrong and you are right 😳

  • #187694

    nimbus
    Participant
    Homeric

    @poppy1 wrote:

    Thanks Grocer I was under the same impression as you before you edited your post,
    but now stand corrected, apologies, I got it wrong and you are right 😳

    So would it not be a good idea to delete the original post ?

  • #187695

    The Grocer
    Participant
    Oracle

    I can understand how this is misinterpreted though…

    Many professional business alarm DO HAVE a “police call out” PIN number facility. (speaking from experience as a former key holder of a large national retail business). Most of these are monitored by a central alarm company and when the PIN number is preceded with a pre-arranged number the monitoring company will alert the police that the key holder is under duress prompting a silent police response.

    On top of that many companies have a pre-determined code (that can be easily phased into conversation) for use on the telephone as well. In many cases a phone call has to me made to the alarm monitoring company prior to entering a building outside certain hours. Senior employees often will carry a card that if they have the opportunity they can show to any abductor stating this fact (the card normally also states they can not alone gain access to money / safe etc depending on the companies policy if it holds a two keyholders present policy).

    Responsible companies also operate a “Tiger kidnap” policy. This is where money can be acquired a speed in the event of the keyholders family being held hostage in their home etc.

    It would be unwise for me to detail this…………..

  • #187696

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    wow!

  • #187697

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    The History of the Middle Finger

    Before the Battle of Agincourt in 1415, the French, anticipating victory over the English, proposed to cut off the middle finger of all captured English soldiers. Without the middle finger it would be impossible to draw the renowned English longbow and therefore they would be incapable of fighting in the future.This famous English longbow was made of the native English Yew tree, and the act of drawing the longbow was known as ‘plucking the yew’ (or ‘pluck yew’).
    Much to the bewilderment of the French, the English won a major upset and began mocking the French by waving their middle fingers at the defeated French, saying, See, we can still pluck yew! Since ‘pluck yew’ is rather difficult to say, the difficult consonant cluster at the beginning has gradually changed to a labiodentals fricative F’, and thus the words often used in conjunction with the one-finger-salute! It is also because of the pheasant feathers on the arrows used with the longbow that the symbolic gesture is known as ‘giving the bird.’ IT IS STILL AN APPROPRIATE SALUTE TO THE FRENCH TODAY! And yew thought yew knew every plucking thing

  • #187698

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    …. As a follow up & being a keen Toxofile, this is my preferred explanation –

    Archers at the butts – from the Luttrell Psalter, c1320-40

    Throughout history, events have been interpreted and spun to suit a variety of agendas, often a patriotic or nationalistic one. This is why a good scholar, if in doubt, always goes back to the sources. It’s hard enough to tackle speculative interpretation and outright falsehood in print, but when a myth reaches the public consciousness, either via oral tradition or by today’s mass media, it’s well on its way to becoming an established “fact”. One of my favourite myths is that of the origin for the famous British two-fingered salute – the V-sign. The origin myth, as given here, goes like this:

    This salute dates back to the English Longbowman who fought the French during the Hundred Years War (1337 – 1453). The French hated the English archers who used the Longbow with such devastating effect. Any English archers who were caught by the French had their Index and middle fingers chopped off from their right hand- a terrible penalty for an archer. This led to the practice of the English archers, especially in siege situations, taunting their French enemy with their continued presence by raising their two fingers in the ‘Two-Fingered Salute’ meaning “You haven’t cut off my fingers !”

    Even the BBC give this etymology. Huzzah! It’s all very affirming if you have even the slightest romantic or patriotic leanings (and happen to be an Anglophile!). The story even makes superficial sense; archers were skilled and professional warriors, and able en masse to seriously disrupt enemy formations. We’ve all heard of their fearsome reputation, and seen how modern-day archers will indeed draw their bows with those first two fingers. We also think of medieval warfare as particularly brutal. Add a dash of casual jingoism and we can easily imagine the old enemy having an informal policy of cutting off those fingers. With this in mind, it seems perfectly logical that the English archers might make the famous gesture to show that they still had their bow-fingers, and would shortly be putting them to use. The story of this “archer’s salute” is oft-told by modern-day proponents, especially within the re-enactment/living history community. They will even sell you “archer’s pendants” inspired by it! Readers may also be familiar with an email version (originating in the USA) involving the rather more obviously fake phrase “pluck yew”. As Snopes points out, this permutation is palpable nonsense (and probably intended as a mildly xenophobic “cheese-eating surrender monkeys”-style joke). But is there any truth at all to the story?

    It was that very Snopes entry that started me thinking critically about this tale. It points out several criticisms, including the unlikely prospect of low-status archers being captured for ransom (a common medieval practice where individuals were known to have the means to pay). The nail in the coffin for me was the realisation that medieval longbows would have required the use of all three main fingers on the strong hand to draw them. As I became more familiar with the retrospective way that origin myths for common memes are constructed (in a similar way to urban myths), I consigned this story to the same mental bin as the fuller on a sword being a “blood-groove“. This was further reinforced when I attended a lecture by the medieval historian Professor Anne Curry, who mentioned the story in passing, saying that she had been unable to find any reference to such a gesture in the primary sources usually suggested (e.g. Froissart).

    Whilst reading the fascinating “Blood Red Roses” on the subject of medieval battlefield archaeology, I became aware (as Prof. Curry and many others no doubt already are) of a genuine inspiration for this myth, in the shape of contemporary Burgundian chronicler Jean de Wavrin (or Jehan de Waurin), as referenced in Prestwich’s “Armies and Warfare in the Middle Ages” (1996). I was pleased to discover a PDF version of Wavrin’s chronicle, hosted by the quite wonderful people at La Bibliothèque nationale de France. The quote that seems to have started this whole myth; appears in the English translation (found in the Fifth Volume of Book One – page 203 of this PDF document) as follows:

    “…And further he told them and explained how the French were boasting that they would cut off three fingers of the right hand of all the archers that should be taken prisoners to the end that neither man nor horse should ever again be killed with their arrows. Such exhortations and many others, which cannot all be written, the King of England addressed to his men”.

    Whilst the Middle French original reads like this:

    “En oultre leur disoit et remoustrait comment les Francois se vantoient que tous les archiers Anglois qui seroient prins feroient copper trois doitz de la main dextre adfin que de leur trait jamais homme ne cheval ne tuassent. Teles admonitions et pluiseurs autres que toutes ne puis escripe fist lors le roy d’Angleterre a ses gens.”

    ..and carries a rather amusing modern French footnote, amounting to “this is really anti-French, but hey, all’s fair in love and war!”.

    As you can see, the quote gives us the probable origin of the V-sign tale as a contemporary suggestion by the English that captured archers would be mutilated by the enemy. At the same time it strikes a fatal blow to the myth as it makes clear that the number of fingers said to be at risk is clearly three, not the two famously used in the modern gesture. The war-bows of the time, with a draw weight of around 100lb, would certainly have required all three. Interesting that this medieval myth, probably intended to spur on the archers by the demonising of the enemy, should give rise to the modern myth of a nationalistic origin for the two-fingered insult. To me this shows the real value of going back to the source material. Wavrin was actually at the battle, although we should remember that he was present on the French side, and so is unlikely to have heard Henry’s speech first-hand. He was also writing more than twenty years after the fact. But on the plus side, he’s about as impartial as medieval chroniclers get, having ties to both sides in the conflict (his father and brother fought and died on the French side, whilst he fought for England later on).

    Neither Wavrin nor any other contemporary source mentions any manual sign of defiance associated with this, and the Agincourt archery story didn’t become popular until the 1990s. It can be seen as both innocent post-hoc rationalisation, and as a conscious attempt to ascribe great antiquity to a culturally distinctive gesture. Either way it’s pretty unhelpful in our understanding either of medieval history, or of the genuine origin of the “V-sign”. Any positive evidence for the latter seems to have been lost, and this myth has been constructed to fill the gap. As this article points out, there is no reference for the gesture before the 1970s. It could be a punk-rock subversion of Winston Churchill‘s “V for Victory” photographs – who knows? [It isn’t – see the comment below]. However it really came about, we can be pretty sure that it’s bugger all to do with medieval archers.

  • #187699

    Pappa Ouzo
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Am I bovvered :roll: :roll:

  • #187700

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Come now Paps. We wouldn’t want to be accused of making truth out of a falsehood just ‘cos it would seem convenient and of the dislike of the French perpetuated by some of us British past and present? ic_shock ic_shock

    If there is no truth in the tall tail, do not bury your head in the Rodos sand, seek out improvement so you can enlighten your fellow Taverna goers………….They are sure to be fascinated :)

    (What? Don’t tell us you live in a little expats enclave ❓ reb_popo ic_shock ic_shock )

  • #187701

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Wieliczka Salt Cathedral – Poland’s Underground Wonder

    Amazing Photo’s and all made from salt !!!!!WOW
    http://www.kopalnia.pl/gallery.php?id_language=2&id_site=860&id_location=1&

    The Wieliczka Salt Mines in Poland have been used for several centuries to extract salt, but are now in the news for a different reason. Through their excavations and adventures, Polish miners have left behind something unique in these underground spaces, little known to the world until recently.
    It has been over ten years since any salt has been extracted from the Wieliczka Mines, and yet, people still pay a visit. Though an ordinary-looking mine from the outside, just 200 meters down below, lies an astonishing spectacle to behold. The salt mine has actually been converted into a cathedral, art gallery and it also contains a lake.
    What’s all the more beautiful and intriguing about this place is that it has been built over the years by miners themselves. During the course of a few centuries, generations of miners left behind pieces of art, religious and historical figures, and even built their own cathedral down under there, to be able to pray. The huge cathedral is perhaps the most astonishing of the wonders that lie below the ground. Remarkable religious carvings can be found, of scenes such as the Last Supper and Jesus appearing to the apostles after crucifixion.

  • #187702

    Ian
    Participant
    Homeric

    @poppy1 wrote:

    Wieliczka Salt Cathedral – Poland’s Underground Wonder

    …scenes such as the Last Supper …

    What was on the menu?
    Salted fish?

    :mrgreen:

  • #187703

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    ….. little known to the world until recently

    How short ago is ‘recently’?
    I was there about 15 years ago, not that ‘recently’ :unibrow:

  • #187704

    nimbus
    Participant
    Homeric

    @Alien wrote:

    ….. little known to the world until recently

    How short ago is ‘recently’?
    I was there about 15 years ago, not that ‘recently’ :unibrow:

    Now that is something to ponder upon Alien, what “yard stick” should be applied when such statements as “recently” are stated, if one considers that our home planet Earth is some 96 million years old then fifteen years are a mere flicker of evolution.
    Don’t you agree :nod:

  • #187705

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    HMS/M PERSEUS; A SUBMARINE, IS FOUND



    John Capes` story of his deep escape and survival in enemy occupied Greece was not believed by many until Greek divers in 1996 discovered the wreck of the Perseus; 170 feet down and sitting almost upright on the sea bed………and they found his rum bottle.

    Another very interesting commission was a memorial to the crew of HMS Perseus which sank with 60 men aboard and their was only one survivor John Capes. The memorial to the crew who perished is in the grounds of the Collegiate Church of St Mary, Stafford. The fascinating story of John Capes’ escape is as follows:
    On the night of 6 December, 1941, H.M.S. PERSEUS was patrolling the surface of the Ionian Sea between the Greek islands of Kefalonia and Zante. On board the ship apart from its permanent crew, were the British Sailor (stoker) John Capes and the Greek Lieutenant Nicolaos Merlin. It was a dark and windy night. Suddenly a tremendous explosion shattered the submarine from stem to stern. The submarine had hit something, probably a mine. From the crack that was caused by the collision οn the port fore side and the opened hatch of the conning tower tons of water surged into the vessel. . A few seconds later the submarine is going down in a nosedive along with sixty officers and sailors that are drifted in the cold waters of the Ionian Sea. .
    From the sixty men that were drifted along with the submarine on the seabed of the Ionian Sea, an English rating managed to do something unique in the Navy History. The stoker John Capes was resting at the aft compartment just before the explosion occurred. He was going through some letters, drinking rum. When H.M.S PERSEUS began to sink, the aft compartment did not flood until the submarine touched the bottom of the Ionian Sea.
    Although injured, Capes started to search for other survivors and found three other badly injured stokers, alive in the debris. Without wasting any time, Capes found the Davis Submerged Escape Apparatus and helped his wounded companions to put them on. Then he had to find a way to open the hatch of the aft compartment and that could only be done by balancing the pressure in the compartment with that in the sea. First he lowered the collapsible canvas escape trunk and secured it by lashings to the deck.
    Unfortunately when he found the valve he had to use in order to flood the compartment he saw that its spindle was bent and immovable. So he had to find another way to do it otherwise they would be trapped. And he did. He flooded the compartment using the underwater gun, which is under normal circumstances used for sending smoke signals to the surface. Immediately he helped his shipmates to duck down under the water, come up inside the trunk and get out to the sea through the escape hatch. Then he followed the same procedure and began his own ascent from 52 meters depth. Straining through his painful ascent he managed to surface and started looking around for his companions, in vain. No one else had survived the sinking of H.M.S. PERSEUS that became an underwater grave for fifty-nine men.
    Despite being badly worn out, Capes summoned up all the energy he had left and started swimming towards the dark mass he could discern in the horizon. After a struggle of many hours with the cold sea he reached to a rocky beach. With great effort he crawled over the rocks to finally get to one of the impressive beaches of Kefalonia Island. Exhausted as he was he lapsed into unconsciousness.
    There he was found by the island inhabitants (Miltiades Xareras and Xaralabos Valianos, two fishermen from the nearest area, Mavrata village, found him) who medically treated and took him into shelter. Having been in good hands for more than 18 months he was helped to escape to safety in Smyrna. John Capes extraordinary survival adventure was difficult to be taken seriously. No one believed his stories as they seemed too far fetched. As such no one ever understood what this man had really gone through, this was more like a journey from hell to paradise. It had never happened before, for someone to escape from such a depth. The story of his dramatic escape included that just before he left the hatch he took a swig of rum for courage and sure enough when the wreck was found in 1996 not only was the open hatch found but there also nearby was the rum bottle which confirmed the amazing story of his escape.

    http://memorials.emerys.co.uk/perseus.html

  • #187706

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Unbelievable!!!!!I bet this will make you feel all warm and fuzzy inside!
    Can you imagine working for a company that only has a little more than 635 employees, but, has the following employee
    statistics…


    29 have been accused of spouse abuse
    7 have been arrested for fraud
    9 have been accused of writing bad cheques
    17 have directly or indirectly bankrupted at least 2 businesses
    3 have done time for assault
    71 cannot get a credit card due to bad credit
    14 have been arrested on drug-related charges
    8 have been arrested for shoplifting
    21 are currently defendants in lawsuits
    84 have been arrested for drink driving in the last year


    and collectively, this year alone, they have cost the British tax payer £92,993,748 in
    expenses!!!
    Which organisation is this?

    It’s the 635 members of the House of Commons.
    The same group that cranks out hundreds of new laws each year designed to keep the rest of us in line.
    What a bunch of b ***** ds we have running our country
    – it says it all…

    And just to top all that they probably have the best ‘corporate’ pension scheme in the country!!

  • #187707

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Ancient Greek Terracotta Statue Looks Like Mr. Bean 😀

  • #187708

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Recently a lipstick brand called ‘Red Earth’
    Decreased their prices from
    $67 to $9.90.
    It contained lead.
    Lead is a chemical which causes cancer.
    The lipstick brands that contain lead are:
    CHRISTIAN DIOR
    LANCÔME
    CLINIQUE
    Y.S..L
    ESTEE LAUDER
    SHISEIDO
    RED EARTH (Lip Gloss)
    CHANEL (Lip Conditioner)
    MARKET AMERICA-MOTNES LIPSTICK.
    The higher the lead content,
    The greater the chance of causing cancer.
    After doing a test on lipsticks,
    It was found that the Y.S.L. Lipstick
    Contained the most amount of lead.
    Watch out for those lipsticks
    Which are supposed to stay longer..
    If your lipstick stays longer, it is
    Because of the higher content of lead.
    Here is the test you can do yourself:
    1. Put some lipstick on your hand..
    2. Use a Gold ring to scratch on the lipstick.
    3. If the lipstick colour changes to black,
    Then you know the lipstick contains lead.
    Please send this information to all your girlfriends, Wives and female family members, or males!

  • #187709

    colind
    Participant
    Neophyte

    @poppy1 wrote:

    SOMETHING I DID NOT KNOW BUT IS VERY USEFUL…….

    If you should ever be forced by a robber to withdraw money from an ATM machine, you can notify the police by entering your PIN in reverse.

    For example, if your pin number is 1234, then you would put in 4321…

    Not available in Greece :roll:

    No reason to be available in Greece, ATM’S are empty :unibrow:

  • #187710

    geckophile397
    Participant
    Neophyte

    The lipstick brands that contain lead are:
    CHRISTIAN DIOR
    LANCÔME
    CLINIQUE
    Y.S..L
    ESTEE LAUDER
    SHISEIDO
    RED EARTH (Lip Gloss)
    CHANEL (Lip Conditioner)
    MARKET AMERICA-MOTNES LIPSTICK.
    The higher the lead content,
    The greater the chance of causing cancer.
    After doing a test on lipsticks,
    It was found that the Y.S.L. Lipstick
    Contained the most amount of lead.
    Watch out for those lipsticks
    Which are supposed to stay longer..
    If your lipstick stays longer, it is
    Because of the higher content of lead.
    Here is the test you can do yourself:
    1. Put some lipstick on your hand..
    2. Use a Gold ring to scratch on the lipstick.
    3. If the lipstick colour changes to black,
    Then you know the lipstick contains lead.
    Please send this information to all your girlfriends, Wives and female family members, or males!

    It’s not true, Poppy. Sorry. Here’s a good place to check these urban myths out:

    http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/lipstick.asp

  • #187711

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    http://www.ecoevaluator.com/lifestyle/beauty/lead-in-lipstick.html
    Jan 17, 2012

    How Can There Be Lead in Lipstick?
    Rate this item
    12345(20 votes)What is one essential that most women carry in their purse, no matter how small: lipstick. This little dab of color can enhance a woman’s complexion, brighten her face and just make her feel more beautiful. But, what’s the price of beauty? Would we trade our health for it? There has been a growing concern about the ingredients in cosmetics. One popular question is if there is lead in lipstick, and if it really poses a threat to health.

    Lead and Its Effects

    Lead is a dangerous substance that builds up in the body. It has been known to cause health problems that are often irreversible. It is considered a neurotoxin, one that causes problems in the brain. Some of the effects of exposure to lead are behavioral, learning, and language problems. Effects of lead on children can include a lowered IQ and reduced school performance. Children and pregnant women have greater risks to lead exposure. In fact, the fetus is prone to the effects of lead exposure because the substance can easily pass the placenta and enter the brain.

    The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention said that there is no safe level of lead exposure and has suggested avoiding lead exposure coming from all sources, including cosmetics. Everyday exposure to lead in cosmetics could result in a lead buildup in the body.

    Lead in Lipstick
    In October of 2007, the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, a nonprofit coalition that is dedicated to eliminate chemicals in cosmetics that are linked to health problems, tested 33 lipstick brands and found that 61% of the lipsticks tested contained lead. In these tests, there were lead levels of 0.65 parts per million (ppm).
    Two years later, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conducted a follow-up test and came up with staggering results. Some lipsticks were found to have 3.06 ppm. The highest levels of lead were found in large industrial cosmetic manufacturers namely: Procter & Gamble’s Cover Girl, L’Oreal, and Revlon.

    FDA’s Role in Cosmetic Regulation
    The FDA is the agency that regulates cosmetics sold in the US. Their role, derived from the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, however, does not give them the authority to require companies to conduct safety tests on cosmetic products before releasing them in the marketplace. Since the FDA may not regulate them beforehand, the product and its ingredients are not reviewed nor approved prior to release. In fact, the FDA’s regulations focus on the approval of color additives and labeling standards. However, the FDA has not yet given a concrete regulation with regards to the ingredients of safe cosmetics. This has allowed traces of heavy metals to be included in cosmetics with no health effect responsibilities.

    Recalls are generated by a voluntary action of the cosmetic industry. If the FDA wants to remove a product from the shelves, it has to prove in court that the product may cause injury to the user or is improperly labeled.
    Measures for Personal Safety

    Since there seem to be loopholes in the current regulations of the $50 billion cosmetic industry, why gamble with those unknown quantities of potentially harmful chemicals? Since cosmetics are one of the least-regulated products in the US, why not opt for safer choices with all natural ingredients. It’s not always easy to switch our beauty regimen, but when it comes to safety, isn’t it better to know than not know?

  • #187712

    geckophile397
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Good god! That is very scarey!! We put so much trust in products we buy and use, assuming them to be safe…Whilst on that site I read about Johnsons Baby products containing formaldehyde! 😯 No wonder I’ve always had an allergic reaction to their stuff!!

    But I’m not dead yet (I just look it sometimes) and have worn lippy for over 40 years (in an effort to make myself look less dead) so maybe the lipsticks I bought only contained lard, gunpowder and caustic soda….. :roll: :unibrow:

  • #187713

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Gecko I tried to find the baby products piece but no luck, can I have the link please.

  • #187714

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric
  • #187715

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Thaks poppy

  • #187716

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Ancient Greek Aphrodisiacs
    This article is dedicated to our gracious Greek goddess of love and beauty Aphrodite, from whose name the word aphrodisiac is derived.

    Artichokes
    Artichokes were believed to be aphrodisiacs that also ensured the birth of sons.

    Garlic
    One of the most venerable substances in medicine and cuisine, garlic was thought to have magical and healing properties and the ability to stir the passions. 😆 😆 😆

    Grapes
    Grapes figured prominently in the sensual rites of Greek Dionysian cults, during which copious amounts of wine was imbibed, loosening inhibitions and enhancing attraction.

    Leeks
    Leeks were considered to have aphrodisiac properties in ancient Greece, possibly because their phallic shape was thought to have sympathetic qualities. 😆 😆 😆 😉

    Legumes
    Hippocrates is said to have prescribed lentils for male virility, which Artistotle cooked with saffron. Plutarch recommended fassolatha, the national bean soup of Greece, for strengthening the libido.Mint
    Mint was considered such a potent aphrodisiac that Aristotle supposedly advised Alexander the Great to order his soldiers not to drink mint tea during campaigns.

    Mushrooms
    Truffles have been a rare and expensive delicacy since the Babylonians, but they were not thought to enhance sexual desire until the ancient Greeks placed them very high on their list of potent aphrodisiacs. The effect is in the nose, so to speak. The musky “male underarm sweat” aroma of truffles is a replication of the male pheromone Androstenone. :mozilla_yell: :mozilla_yell:

    Satirio
    Satirio is a wild orchid believed to be a powerful aphrodisiac by Dioscorides, (40-90 A. D.), the founder of pharmacology. Plutarch also mentions Satirio in his Precepts of Health.

    Stafylinos
    Stafylinos was a wild plant used in sex potions to enhance sexual desire. :roll:

    Footnote

    1.Hippocrates, however, believed that ingesting mint on a regular basis would lower energy, dilute sperm and hinder erections and other bodily functions. 😆 :roll:

    2.There is also a Greek god named Satyros who has short horns and hooves and dwells in forests, and a haunting tale about Orchis, the beautiful, swaggering son of a satyr and a nymph who tries to seduce a priestess of the god Bacchus. Her fellow Bacchantes are so incensed by his audacity, they tear him limb from limb. Horrified by what they have done to Orchis’ lovely form, they take pity on the young godling and grant him eternal life in the form of a wild orchid flower.

    Source

    Πολύτιμες Αρχαίες Αφροδισιακές Συνταγές (Prized Ancient Recipes for Aphrodisiacs) by Lena Terkesithou.

  • #187717

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Well then, dinner tomorrow is leeks in grape juice with a confit of mushrooms, and I will be wearing my fish bra.

  • #187718

    DayGloScooter
    Participant
    Neophyte

    This is not the first time that Greece has broken the rules and scuppered monetary union?

    From 1868 to 1908, Greece was part of the “Latin Monetary Union” , but got thrown out after successive governments reduced the amount of gold in the coins. Sound familiar?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17140379

  • #187719

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    http://www.usatoday.com/money/perfi/stocks/story/2012-02-26/stock-market-bears-doomsayers/53259742/1 Just to cheer you all up this morning. I like the ‘buy gold’ bit, Have they seen the prices?

  • #187720

    Sancho the Fat
    Participant
    Neophyte
  • #187721

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric
  • #187722

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Capital punishment in Greece
    In Greece the last execution took place on the 25th of August 1972. The 27 year old Vassilis Lymberis was shot by firing squad for the murder of his wife, mother-in-law and two children on the island of Crete.
    Lymberis didn’t so much deny torching the place as he did go for the insanity-esque defense of being off his rocker from the mother-in-law.
    He also insisted that he didn’t know his children were in the house when he set it ablaze. “If you don’t believe me,” he insisted, “execute me this very moment!”
    That Lymberis would obtain his milestone status was hardly predictable at the time; the country was still under the military junta; two years later, the regime collapsed and its former principals were themselves sentenced to death. (Those sentences were later commuted.)

    Capital punishment was abolished for peacetime crimes other than treason during wartime by the Constitution of 1975
    In 1997 Greece ratified the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, aiming at the abolition of the death penalty; however, a reservation was made allowing for death penalty use for the most serious crimes of a military nature committed during wartime. Protocol No. 6 to the European Convention on Human Rights, providing for the abolition of the death penalty in peacetime, was ratified in 1998.
    Greece abolished the death penalty for all crimes in 2004; in 2005, Greece ratified the Protocol No. 13 to the ECHR, concerning the abolition of the death penalty under all circumstances.

  • #187723

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Was very sad to see this morning 77 year old man shot himself in Syntagma and left a note to the rulers…

    It angers me to know that common folk are being crippled while the 300 rulemakers past and present remain untouched and their lives continue as before.

    http://www.athensnews.gr/portal/1/54580

    PS; I note that this article does not mention the contents of the note which I am told read

    “I am a pensioner, I cannot live under these conditions anymore, I cannot rummage daily through rubbish to feed myself, and so I have decided to put an end to my life.” RIP

    Edited again…I have to mention that the story is starting to change to – shot himself because didn’t want to leave debts to his children…

    Many papers are saying that no note was found according to police. Who can know the truth. I don’t think that reporting of suicides is encouraged at the moment in Greece.

  • #187724

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    And here is a translation… Finally he put in his life today 77chronos a man in the middle of Syntagma Square!

    Around 9 this morning 77chronos man stood on the steps Joined square and then shot himself in the head in front of passersby.

    The note was left in his pocket saying: “The occupation government Tsolakoglou me truncate all traces of survival. I can not find another way to react other than dignified end before I start looking in the garbage to survive and become a burden to my child” said the suicide note left.

    Witnesses reported that the old man shouted: “I do not want to leave debts to my children” and then drew his pistol and shot himself.

    At this point the police and rushed to the ambulance, while the corpse of the man was transferred to the Annunciation.

    The 77chronos was old chemist and member of the club until 1994.

    Περισσότερα: «Φεύγω, για να μην ψάχνω φαγητό στα σκουπίδια»

  • #187725

    colind
    Participant
    Neophyte

    That’s so sad. Freedom or death was the motto of the Greek revolution and when you have to search in garbage for food, when you can do nothing to change that system, you don’t feel that you’re free. RIP old man we’re not going to let you down.. and that 300 traitors who declare theirselves to be our saviors, must think that the next citizen in a situation like this could prefer not to suicide but send one of them to hell.

  • #187726

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    So many have committed suicide in Greece, we are top in Europe now – but this one hit a nerve…even I sensed it. It reminds me of the Tunisian uprising when that young man burnt himself and sparked off the Tunis Spring. Certainly it will have a huge impact because now too many people are at breaking point with the harsh measures and cuts, especially because while they suffer, no perpetrator of any financial crime has been punished. There is anger which if it spills no one will be able to contain. The man was originally from Karditsa.

  • #187727

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Death Valley

    The power plants of Kardia and Agios Dimitrios are the two biggest in Greece. Together, they produce 70 percent of Greece’s electricity. According to WWF (formerly the World Wildlife Fund), the two plants are the top two most polluting in all of the European Union. They are located in the near the city of Kozani, about 300 miles north of Athens. Greece’s Public Power Coroporation bought the neighboring towns of Charavgi and Kleitos and have relocated residents. The only person still living in Kleitos is Jangdip Pal, an Indian immigrant who works as a security guard at the nearby lignite mine. A shepherd and his family continue to live in Charavgi.
    Ptolemaida is a town and a former municipality in Kozani regional unit, West Macedonia, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Eordaia, of which it is the seat and a municipal unit. It is known for its coal (lignite) mines and its power stations which cover an area of 170,000 square meters. In Ptolemaida area is based the most pollutive power station of Europe. Kozani prefecture, west Macedonia, northern Greece. Dust and coal, ingredients that make up a very unhealthy environment. In the last twenty years, many villages were led to forced relocation because they were found at the heart of the mine which is growing and swallows many streets and fields.

  • #187728

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    …..and with the wind blowing in a certain direction….That explains Kiwi’s mysterious rosemary deaths…. ic_shock

  • #187729

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Keep this in mind the next time you either hear or are about
    to repeat a rumor!

    In ancient Greece (469 – 399 BC), Socrates was well known
    for his wisdom. One day the great philosopher came upon an
    acquaintance who said excitedly, “Socrates, do you know what
    I just heard about one of our students?”

    Wait a moment,” Socrates replied. “Before telling me anything
    I’d like you to pass a little test. It’s called the Triple
    Filter Test.”

    “Triple filter?”

    “That’s right,” Socrates continued “Before you talk to me
    about my student, it might be a good idea to take a moment
    and filter what you’re going to say.. The first filter is
    Truth. Have you made absolutely sure that what you are about
    to tell me is true?”

    “No,” the man said, “actually I just heard about it and …”

    “All right,” said Socrates. “So you don’t really know if it’s
    true or not. Now let’s try the second filter, the filter of
    Goodness. Is what you are about to tell me about my student
    something good?”

    “No, on the contrary ….”

    “So,” Socrates continued, “you want to tell me something bad
    about him, but you’re not certain it’s true. You may still
    pass the test though, because there’s one filter left: the
    filter of Usefulness. Is what you want to tell me about my
    student going to be useful to me?”

    “No, not really.”

    “Well,” concluded Socrates, “if what you want to tell me is
    neither true nor good nor even useful, why tell it to me at
    all?”.

    This is the reason Socrates was a great philosopher and held
    in such high esteem.

    It also explains why he never found out that Plato was
    banging his wife.

  • #187730

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric
  • #187731

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    @poppy1 wrote:

    Behold the world’s first computer
    http://www.sciencespin.com/magazine/archive/2009/07/behold-the-worlds-first-computer-/

    And not surprisingly…………… it was Greek! :mrgreen:

  • #187732

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    WORRIED YOUR PENSION WILL RUN SHORT?
    So you’re a sick senior citizen and the Government says there is no nursing home for you – what do you do?
    Senior Health Care Solution!!!!
    Our plan gives anyone 65 years or older a gun and 4 bullets. You are allowed to shoot 2 MPs and 2 illegal immigrants!!!!
    Of course, this means you will be sent to prison where you will get 3 meals a day, a roof over your head, central heating, air conditioning and all the health care you need!New teeth? – No problem.Need glasses? – Great.
    New hip, knees, kidney, lungs, heart? All covered.(And your kids can come and visit you as often as they do now).And who will be paying for all of this?The same government that just told you that you they cannot afford for you to go into a home. Plus, because you are a prisoner, you don’t have to pay income tax any more. IS THIS A GREAT COUNTRY OR WHAT? No wonder the rest of the world’s population can’t get here fast enough!

  • #187733

    Angela
    Participant
    Neophyte

    I prefer the pension system of the country just to the north, where they have an indentical system, except that you’re allowed to shoot two MPs and two people with whom you have idealogical differences…

    such as people who think illegal immigrants deserve to be shot

  • #187734

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    Only so few bullets? I sometimes feel I could shoot a lot more than that 😉 [ Mainly politicians, terrorists, bigots, hardliners, softies, the opposite sex, journalists, public employees, rich people, hypocritical philanthropists, celebrities, man in the street, academics, sycophants, advisers, experts, leaders, followers, all the arrogant, idiots…………….have I left any group out? what not enough bullets?] I would have to shoot myself last 😳

  • #187735

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    A post-communist Greek village in Hungary

    A Greek village in Hungary appears to have followed the same financial policies as our country over the past years. The the village of Belloiannisz in Fejér county was founded by Communist Greek refugees who left Greece after the Civil War, and was named after Nikos Beloyannis.
    Greek immigrants have been living in the village since 1950. Belloiannisz has become famous all over the Hungarian press, as there is frequent coverage regarding the dramatic economic state of the village’s administration. A recent Hungarian article ironically reports the Greeks have probably brought their traditional Greek “habits” with them, since the municipality is heavily indebted. The debt amounts to approximately 200,000 euros (or 61 million Hungarian forints).
    The villagers seem to have followed Greece’s steps in regard to financial administration. No one can deny, however, their cultural contribution combined with the fact that their presence in Hungary has always been discreet and respectful.
    The two Greek mayors of the village have been tossing responsibility over the debt to one another.
    http://www.oswego.edu/~baloglou/misc/hungary.html

  • #187736

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    GREEK BANDIT ACCLIMATED

    Published in The New York Times, December 28, 1898
    5,000 FRANCS, DEAD OR ALIVE
    Price Placed in His Head by Greek Government –

    Arrested Here for Robbing Sailor. 😆 😆 😆 😆 😆

    Michael Ferrando, who is charged with having decoyed a Greek sailor, Nicholas Zoutzouble, of 382 Water Street, to his room, at 139 East Thirteenth Street, last Thursday and there beaten him into insensibility and robbed him, was identified yesterday in Yorkville Police Court as the ferocious Greek brigand Soteros de Sarantos, for whom the Greek Government has offered 5,000f., dead or alive. He was recognized by George Zegouras, a collector of ferns and wild flowers, 😆 who lives at 111 West Sixteenth Street.

    Ferrando, or Sarantos, is over six feet high, of herculean proportions and tremendous strength. He is known to all his friends as “The Big Greek.” He has been in this country for many months, and has, it is said been recognized by many Greeks, but they stood so much in awe of his fierce prowess that they were afraid to disclose his identity to the authorities.
    Detectives Jackson and O’Connor of the East Fifth Street Station arrested the Greek for the robbery of the sailor. When Zoutzouble recovered consciousness after having been knocked senseless by a revolver in the hands of Ferrando, he found that his diamond ring, $5 in money, and his watch were gone. He complained to the police, and intimated that Ferrando was a brigand. The detectives went prepared for a hard fight, but Sarantos submitted to arrest without much trouble.
    Just before the breaking out of the Graeco-Turkish war, according to the witnesses in the police court, a band of desperate brigands under the leadership of Sarantos infested the southern portion of Greece. The outlaws imprisoned wealthy residents of the country and travelers, and held them for ransom. Many English and other tourists suffered at the hands of the outlaws. The bandits became so bold that the Greek Government sent a detail of soldiers to aid the police in suppressing them. The outlaws and the authorities came into conflict, and a Captain of police and five soldiers were killed by the outlaws. The Greek Government then offered a reward for the capture of Sarantos, dead or alive.
    Ferrando denies emphatically that he is Sarantos, and declares that the identification is a plot on the part of his enemies to get rid of him.
    Nicolas Zoutzouble, the sailor, with his head swathed in bandages, told the Magistrate of the assault and robbery. After having gone over the incident, he pointed to Ferrando and said:
    “That man is a counterfeiter, and I can prove it. Send a couple of officers with me to Jersey City, and I will show them where the counterfeit money is being made.”
    Zegouras was the next witness. He said that Ferrando was, like himself, a fern collector. He was positive that Ferrando was Sarantos, the Greek brigand, and said he was known as such to all the Greeks in the city. They were afraid to testify against him. Zegouras said that some time ago he and a companion were in the woods near Canaan, Conn., gathering ferns, when they came across Ferrando, similarly engaged. Ferrando drew a revolver and fired several shots at them. Zegouras said that he had received a letter from his father, in Naupaktos, Greece, stating that Ferrando was Sarantos and giving an accurate description of Ferrando. He said, furthermore, that he knew personally that Ferrando was Sarrantos. He said he would communicate further with his father and get more details. The testimony of Zegouras made quite an impression on the Court.
    Demos Cancollis, a lawyer’s clerk, also stated positively that Ferrando was Sarantos. Cancollis said that some time ago Ferrando was in a restaurant at 23 Roosevelt Steet, and began to smash some things. He expostulated and Ferrando chased him five blocks with a stiletto. At this point Ferrando declared that Cancollis had served two years in Sing Sing for forgery. When Magistrate Kudlich asking if this was true, Cancollis said: “I decline to answer.” Magistrate Kudlich dismissed Cancollis from the stand.
    A number of other witnesses identified Ferrando as Sarantos, the brigand, both by descriptions from home and by personal acquaintance. Ferrando denied emphatically all the allegations, including the charges made by the sailor.
    Magistrate Kudlich held Ferrando for trial in $1,000 bail for the assault on the sailor, and instructed Detectives O’Connor and Jackson to lay the matter before the Greek consul, Demetrius N. Botassi.
    When Ferrando was arrested he wrote a letter in Greek to Adjy Neivo, at 50 West Fourteenth Street. He asked Detectives Jackson and O’Connor to deliver the letter. Believing that they might obtain some useful information from the communication, the detectives held it, and had it translated yesterday. In the letter Ferrando says, among other things:

    They have got me at last, and I am in one of the most desperate scrapes that I ever got into. I want you to come to court and testify that you were there. Swear, and lie, lie, lie. Tell the Court that this man attempted an assault upon me. That, I think, will get me out of it.
    The detectives could not find Neivo at the address given. They visited the Greek Consul, at 35 South William Street, yesterday afternoon, and asked him if he knew that the bandit on whose head his Government and set a price was in this country. The Consul said that he had known the fact for several months, but could take no action, as his Government had given him no instructions in the matter. He said there was a treaty between Greece and the United States under which Ferrando could be extradited, but that it would be useless to take advantage of it, because the prisoner would have to be sent to Greece via France and Italy, and would be a free man as soon as he set foot in either of those countries. He congratulated the detectives on their capture, saying: “You have captured a dangerous man.”

    The detectives visit the Greek quarter and talked with many of the Greeks there concerning Ferrando. They nearly all declared that he was the noted bandit.
    It is believed by the police that Ferrando had an accomplice in crime in this city, and that his name is Demetri. They are looking for him.
    Was this your Great Grandfather Bandit ❓ ❓ ❓ ❓ :roll: 😆 😆 😆 😆 😆

  • #187737

    Bandit
    Participant
    Neophyte

    Ha Ha Well it very easily might have been, and he also had a friend Demitri (Mitsos)
    So do you think I may have inherited some of his Genes.

    Regards,
    Bandit. 😈

  • #187738

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    depend which brand you are on about Bandi Levi’s, Wrangler or Lee’s 😆 :unibrow:

  • #187739

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Did you know that a Banana tree is a herb, and the bloody goats in Greece love it Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr cos they have ate mine 👿

  • #187740

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    kiwi spreading some banana herb on her lamb chops…?

  • #187741

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Did you know that the one of the rarest honey’s in Greece comes from the Strawberry Tree it’s considered a very rare honey due to difficulty in production as it only blossoms in the autumn months.
    The Strawberry Tree ( Koumari in Greek) starts off as a shrub however in the right conditions it can grow to a tree exceeding 12 m in height. The fruit smells like anise but doesn’t taste like that, It’s more like a cross between guava and nectarine
    Koumaria Honey is dark, with a bitter taste and distinctive aroma. and goes great with cheese.

  • #187742

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    And this was in 2003

    Thirty Facts You Should Know About The EU (taken from the book ‘England Our England’ by Vernon Coleman)
    http://www.vernoncoleman.com/EU123.htm

  • #187743

    poppy1
    Participant
    Homeric

    Fungus that feeds on plastic discovered in Ecuador Energy Ecology Environment:

    Plastics are the largest problem in waste management worldwide since broken after many years.
    But a new discovery by researchers at Yale University may speed the process, eliminating the plastic very quickly.
    More specifically, in the expedition to the Ecuadorian rainforest, students of the Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry Yale discovered a fungus that is hungry for polyurethane (plastic) and hitherto unknown.
    This is the first fungus determined to survive only with polyurethane and even in an anaerobic environment (without oxygen), which means they could be grown on the bottom of landfills.
    Polyurethane is one of the polymers used in a wide range of products and materials, from hard plastic and synthetic fabrics.
    The main reason why plastics such as polyurethane, are considered “immortal” is that the microorganisms do not recognize as food thus burdening the environment for centuries until they break.
    However, the discovery of the fungus Pestalotiopsis microspora may change the management of plastic waste. Indeed, researchers have been studying and isolating the enzyme gives miraculous ability to mold the plastic to break down.
    Reducing the use of plastic is definitely the first and most important step in protecting the environment, but if the fungus from Ecuador is willing to help you even better.

    econews

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