Balsamico

This topic contains 9 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  sundodger 2 years, 11 months ago.

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  • #158694

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    A few years ago I read something about Greek balsamico. Had to read it twice, after visiting quite a few Greek islands I couldn’t remember ever tasting balsamico. Planned to keep an eye out on my next visit but forgot.
    We now have a good Greek restaurant on ‘bicycle distance’ in NL and I happened to order a salad and wow that balsamico was delicious! Ofcourse I asked if I could see the bottle, so I knew what to look for in Greece. It was from the Meteora. Jammie, very nice.

    During my visit in May we were in Crete, but I couldn’t find the Meteora balsamico. Never mind I took 2 different Crete variaties and tasted one yesterday. Much redder: does that mean ‘younger’?

    In what dishes do the Greeks use balsamico, because I do try many dishes on different islands. Or is it a typical Mainland dish?

  • #194948

    kolofarthos
    Participant
    Homeric

    According to this website this is about the No 1 in Greece (aren’t they always the best!)?
    http://www.papadim.com/en/frequently-asked-questions/

    Not certain about your question but I think you are correct.
    We have never had it in Greece so must be missing something on our salads but have had Italian (which must be inferior reb_popo 😉 ) Last visit to York we found a great wee shop called the Hairy Fig which had a really huge selection of balsamic vingars. We bought the 25 year old as we could not justify the 100 year old variety (it was Italian anyway :) ) From memory (and that’s non too good these days…what was I writing?,,,,,) the older stuff was darker as well as stronger tasting and thicker.

    Must try it on our next ‘Greek’ salad! and any other dishes you find out from your thread!

  • #194949

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Try this chicken with honey and balsamic recipe. Use a translator.

    http://mageirikikaisintages.blogspot.gr/2010/11/blog-post_13.html :)

  • #194946

    altohb
    Participant
    Hoplite

    That sounds yummy – will certainly give it a try.

    Balsamic – just lately I’ve been able to buy “light” coloured balsamic (in Xalkiadakis & Ariadne supermarkets) Ideal for use in making onion marmalade, as it doesn’t add colour.

  • #194947

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    I think I will finish my Italian 30 year old balsamic in stew or soup and quick get a start on the other bottle of Cretan balsamic I bought.
    Hopefully I will find the (dark) Meteora one in September in Greece.

    Strange the Greeks don’t really seem to use it themselves though.
    As long as they keep on making it, I am happy :))

  • #194953

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Best use for it is to cut aubergines and zucchini into thin strips and either fry or char grill them, then lay them on a plate and sprinkle with balsamic vinegar…delicious. Also, the other thing I use it for is roasted green peppers whole, then cut in half or quarters and put into a jar covered with balsamic…nirvana.

  • #194954

    sundodger
    Participant
    Homeric

    Use it how you like & where you like to “lift” the flavour of most foods, good in stir fries & veggie dishes. As a salad dressing mix oil, balsamico & honey together, for a delicious flavour. Locally produced balsamico widely available in the Peloponnese & used a lot in the restaurants on the coast, especially in the Navarino area

  • #194950

    KP
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    Those are the typical uses for Balsamic, but you really should try it on fresh fruit!
    Slices of apple or pear, etc with a trickle of the dark Balsamic…. or even better, trickle a bit of honey over the fruit first, then add the Balsamic and the sweet and sour mix is amazing!

    The older the Balsamic the better it tastes, with a really good one being at least 30 years old!
    They can start with a 50 gallon wooden cask of Balsamic and each year or so move it into a new barrel and as it evaporates, they can end up with a gallon at the most of the 50 gallons after many decades, which is why a litre bottle of really top Balsamic can cost hundreds of pounds.

  • #194951

    kiwi
    Participant
    Aristotelic

    So we could speed up the process cheaper by boiling it down… :))

  • #194952

    Alien
    Participant
    Oracle

    I gather only a posh restaurant in Greece would use it, now I know why I have never tasted it in Greece before.

    KP don’t forget to try it on strawberries :nod:

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